Aug 22, 2017

RhoDeo 1734 Roots

Hello, The US got shrowded in darkness today, no reason to mourn, but many felt reason to moan “Oh my God!” whilst watching in awe the spectacle that unfolded before their eyes. As quickly as it came, the eclipse receded, as the umbra – the location of the total shadow – bolted across the continent at an average speed of 1,700 miles per hour. Time to get back to US' biggest attraction...Trump



Today's artist  was the second Argentine musician to make a significant impact upon modern jazz -- the first being Lalo Schifrin, in whose band he played. His story is that of an elongated zigzag odyssey between his homeland and North America. He started out playing to traditional Latin rhythms in his early years, turning his back on his heritage to explore the jazz avant-garde in the '60s, reverting to South American influences in the early '70s, playing pop and fusion in the late '70s, only to go back and forth again in the '80s. North American audiences first heard Barbieri when he was a wild bull, sporting a coarse, wailing John Coltrane/Pharoah Sanders-influenced tone. Yet by the mid-'70s, his approach and tone began to mellow somewhat. Still, regardless of the idiom in which he worked, the warm-blooded artist was always one of the most overtly emotional tenor sax soloists on record, occasionally driving the voltage ever higher with impulsive vocal cheerleading. His nickname, Gato, is Spanish for "cat".. ...N'Joy

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Gato Barbieri was the second Argentine musician to make a significant impact upon modern jazz -- the first being Lalo Schifrin, in whose band Barbieri played. His story is that of an elongated zigzag odyssey between his homeland and North America. He started out playing to traditional Latin rhythms in his early years, turning his back on his heritage to explore the jazz avant-garde in the '60s, reverting to South American influences in the early '70s, playing pop and fusion in the late '70s, only to go back and forth again in the '80s. North American audiences first heard Barbieri when he was a wild bull, sporting a coarse, wailing John Coltrane/Pharoah Sanders-influenced tone. Yet by the mid-'70s, his approach and tone began to mellow somewhat in accordance with ballads like "What a Diff'rence a Day Makes" (which he always knew as the vintage bolero "Cuando Vuelva a Tu Lado") and Carlos Santana's "Europa." Still, regardless of the idiom in which he worked, the warm-blooded Barbieri was always one of the most overtly emotional tenor sax soloists on record, occasionally driving the voltage ever higher with impulsive vocal cheerleading.

Though Barbieri's family included several musicians, he did not take up an instrument until the age of 12 when a hearing of Charlie Parker's "Now's the Time" encouraged him to study the clarinet. Upon moving to Buenos Aires in 1947, he continued private music lessons, picked up the alto sax, and by 1953 had become a prominent national musician through exposure in the Schifrin orchestra. Later in the '50s, Barbieri started leading his own groups, switching to tenor sax. After moving to Rome in 1962 with his Italian-born wife, he met Don Cherry in Paris the following year and, upon joining his group, became heavily absorbed in the jazz avant-garde. Barbieri also played with Mike Mantler's Jazz Composer's Orchestra in the late '60s; you can hear his fierce tone unleashed in the "Hotel Overture" of Carla Bley's epic work Escalator Over the Hill.

Yet after the turn of the next decade, Barbieri experienced a slow change of heart and began to reincorporate and introduce South American melodies, instruments, harmonies, textures, and rhythm patterns into his music. Albums such as the live El Pampero on Flying Dutchman and the four-part Chapter series on Impulse! -- the latter of which explored Brazilian and Afro-Cuban rhythms and textures, as well as Argentine -- brought Barbieri plenty of acclaim in the jazz world and gained him a following on American college campuses.

However, it was a commercial accident, his sensuous theme and score for the controversial film Last Tango in Paris in 1972, that made Barbieri an international star and a draw at festivals in Montreux, Newport, Bologna, and other locales. A contract with A&M in the U.S. led to a series of softer pop/jazz albums in the late '70s, including the brisk-selling Caliente! He returned to a more intense, rock-influenced, South American-grounded sound in 1981 with the live Gato...Para los Amigos under the aegis of producer Teo Macero, before doubling back to pop/jazz on Apasionado. Yet his profile in the U.S. was diminished later in the decade in the wake of the buttoned-down neo-bop movement.

He continued to record and perform well into the 1980s, including composing the scores to films such as Firepower (1979) and Strangers Kiss (1983). Beset by triple-bypass surgery and bereavement over the death of his wife, Michelle, who was his closest musical confidant, Barbieri was inactive through much of the 1990s. But he returned to action in 1997, playing with most of his impassioned intensity, if limited in ideas, at the Playboy Jazz Festival in Los Angeles and recording a somewhat bland album, Que Pasa, for Columbia. Che Corazon followed in 1999.

As the 21st century opened, Barbieri saw a steady stream of collections and reissues of his work appear. A new album, Shadow of the Cat, appeared from Peak Records in 2002.   Barbieri was the inspiration for the character Zoot in the fictional Muppet band Dr. Teeth and The Electric Mayhem. On April 2, 2016, Barbieri died of pneumonia in New York City at the age of 83.

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After his successes of the mid-'70s, Barbieri, on the heels of his hit "Last Tango in Paris," went the commercial route for awhile. Apasionado was one of his better recordings of the '80s, a spirited workout with a large Latin rhythm section during which he interprets six lesser-known tunes (four written by Gato) plus a remake of "Last Tango."



Gato Barbieri - Apasionado (flac  296mb)

01 Latin Lovers 6:35
02 Que Pasa 6:59
03 Last Tango In Paris 6:28
04 Terra Me Siente 4:30
05 Angel 6:39
06 Tiempo Buono 4:02
07 Habanera 5:17

Gato Barbieri - Apasionado (ogg  105mb)

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Making love with candlelight, a good merlot, viagra and music by Gato Barbieri........, he tantilizes, taunts, teases, fills, drives explodes in a shower of sound that is the musical definition of sensuality. Gato invades all of the listeners space in a way that leaves you totally satisfied but willing to kill yourself for just one more little "taste". with this album, you will own 2 of his best songs, She is Michelle and Europa. Barbieri's smooth key changes and wonderful melodies are true works of art. Barbieri's slow and soft sound consoles your hurt of mind very efficiently too. Gato is not just the whipped cream on the dessert he is a complete meal with exquisite wine..........yummy!



Gato Barbieri - Passion and Fire   (flac  237mb)

01 I Want You 5:57
02 Fiesta 4:00
03 Europa (Earth's Cry Heaven's Smile) 4:12
04 Poinciana (Song Of The Tree) 3:41
05 Theme From Firepower 3:17
06 She Is Michelle 6:12
07 Ruby 3:57
08 Speak Low 6:33

Gato Barbieri - Passion and Fire   (ogg  90mb )

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Gato Barbieri's first recording in a decade finds his distinctive (and always passionate) tenor tone still mostly intact. However, he does little other than state the 11 melodies (which range from catchy to completely forgettable), and the backing is quite anonymous, over-produced and obviously geared for potential radio airplay. In fact, if Gato's tenor were replaced by a vocalist, this would be a pop record. It is nice to have Barbieri back on the scene again, but he is capable of much better than this run-of-the-mill effort.



Gato Barbieri - Qui Pasa (flac  413mb)

01 Straight Into The Sunrise 5:36
02 Blue Gala 5:57
03 Mystica 5:18
04 Dancing With Dolphins 6:24
05 Círculos 5:54
06 Guadeloupe 5:13
07 Cause We've Ended As Lovers 5:01
08 Indonesia 4:48
09 The Woman I Remember 5:10
10 Granada 5:49
11 Adentro 4:25

Gato Barbieri - Qui Pasa (ogg  144mb)

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An improvement on tenor saxophonist Gato Barbieri's previous Columbia debut, this outing mostly features his romantic and passionate horn in the spotlight. One song is primarily a vocal feature for Gato. His backup band (which usually includes bassist Mark Egan and guitarist Chuck Loeb) is generally quite spirited, but it is the tenor who stars throughout. Even when sticking to the melody (Gato and Loeb wrote most of the material), there is so much feeling in Barbieri's playing that he largely possesses each song, even an oddly memorable rendition of "Auld Lang Syne." And, although the performances are a bit commercial in spots, Barbieri's sincere emotionalism consistently uplifts this recording.



Gato Barbieri - Che Corazon   (flac  392mb)

01 Introduction 0:36
02 Cristiano 5:01
03 I Want You 5:03
04 Seven Servants 4:01
05 Blue Eyes 5:22
06 Eclipse 5:34
07 1812 4:30
08 The Woman On The Lake 4:41
09 Rosa 5:49
10 Sweet Glenda 3:48
11 Encounter 4:59
12 Auld Land Syne 4:14
13 Finale 3:10

Gato Barbieri - Che Corazon (ogg  142mb)

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2 comments:

Anonymous said...

While Que Pasa, admittedly, leans pretty strong to the "smooth" end of things, it's still Gato, man. His version of "Cause We've Ended As Lovers" absolutely smokes (or maybe smolders is a better word choice.)

Guitarradeplastico your favorite musician said...

Many thanks,I have only
Gato Barbieri - Apasionado