Dec 31, 2018

RhoDeo 1852 Re-Up 170

Hello,

6 correct requests for this week, 3 cloudy re ups too early whatever another batch of 22 re-ups (7.5 gig)


These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a smaller number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here remember to request from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned), and please check the previous update request if it's less then a year old i won't re-up either.

Looka here , requests fulfilled up to December 30th... N'Joy

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4x Aetix Back in Flac (Elvis Costello - This Year's Model, Elvis Costello & - Almost Blue, Elvis Costello & the Attractions - Trust, Elvis Costello - Trust bonus)


4x Sundaze Back In Flac (Space Night Vol. 03 alpha, Space Night Vol. 03 beta, Space Night Vol. 04  alpha, Space Night Vol. 04 beta)


4x Sundaze Back in Flac (Orchid Star - Birth, Orchid Star - Re-Birth , Orchid-Star - Faster, Brother Culture - Isis )


4x Sundaze Back In Flac (The Irresistible Force - Flying High, The Irresistible Force - Global Chillage, The Irresistible Force - It's Tommorrow, The Irresistible Force - FiSH dances)


3x Roots Back in Flac (Boubacar Traoré - Mariama, Boubacar Traore - Sa Golo, Boubacar Traoré - Maciré )





cloudy files re-ups

1x Grooves NOW In Flac (The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol. 7) )


1x Grooves NOW in Flac (Sly & The Family Stone - Life)

1x Sundaze NOW in Flac (Virginia Astley - Had I The Heavens)


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Dec 30, 2018

Sundaze 1852

Hello, .


Today's Artist  is better known by his stage name μ-Ziq (pronounced "mu-sic" or mew-zeek), an English electronic musician from Wimbledon, London. He is one of the pioneering IDM electronic music acts during the 90's, alongside Aphex Twin, Autechre, and The Orb. He is also the founder of the record label Planet Mu. .......N'Joy

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One of the premier names in the field of electronic home-listening music, Mike Paradinas' recordings retain the abrasive flavor of early techno pioneers and explore the periphery of experimental electronica even while coddling to his unusual ear for melody, the occasional piece of vintage synthesizer gear, and distorted beatbox rhythms. While his side projects -- including Diesel M, Jake Slazenger, Gary Moscheles, Kid Spatula, and Tusken Raiders -- have often emphasized (or satirized) his debts to jazz, funk, and electro, Paradinas reserves his most original and exciting work for major album releases as µ-Ziq. Early µ-Ziq LPs were based around the most ear-splitting buzz-saw percussion ever heard (in a musical environment or otherwise), with fast-moving though deceptively fragile synthesizer melodies running over the top. As Paradinas began weaving his various influences into a convincing whole, his work became more fully developed, a fluid blend of breakbeat hip-hop and drum'n'bass with industrial effects and the same brittle melodies from his earlier work. Later works have reflected his interest in other forward-thinking electronic styles such Chicago's juke/footwork scene, while also looking back to his formative influences such as the British rave scene and Detroit techno.

Born in Wimbledon (though he grew up in several other spots around London), Paradinas began playing keyboards during the early '80s and listened to new wave bands like Human League and New Order. He joined a few bands in the mid-'80s, then spent eight years on keyboards for the group Blue Innocence. During that time, however, Paradinas had been recording on his own as well with synthesizers and a four-track recorder. When Blue Innocence disintegrated in 1992, he and bass player Francis Naughton bought sequencing software and re-recorded some of Paradinas' old material. After the material was played for Mark Pritchard and Tom Middleton -- the duo behind Global Communication and Reload as well as being the heads of Evolution Records -- they wanted to release it; recording commitments later forced Pritchard and Middleton to withdraw their agreement, though by that time Richard D. James (aka Aphex Twin) had also heard the tracks and agreed to release a double album for his label, Rephlex Records.

The debut album for µ-Ziq (paraphrased from the side of a blank tape and pronounced "mew-zeek") was 1993's Tango n' Vectif. The LP set the template for most of Paradinas' later work, with at times shattering metal-cage percussion underpinning a collection of rather beautiful melodies. The Rephlex label was just beginning to flourish, with added journalistic attention paid to Aphex Twin's recent Selected Ambient Works 85-92, and though James began to feature less in label doings than co-founder Grant Wilson Claridge, later Rephlex work by Cylob, Luke Vibert (aka Wagon Christ), Seefeel, and Squarepusher made it among the cream of electronic home-listening labels.

When Naughton began taking college more seriously (something Paradinas had attempted briefly, from 1990 through 1992), he officially bowed out of µ-Ziq. Second album Bluff Limbo was scheduled to be released in mid-1994, though only 1,000 copies made it out of the gate. (It was officially issued by Rephlex in 1996 after Paradinas served papers on the label.) Paradinas' first major-label release came later in 1994, after he undertook a remix project for Virgin Records. The EP µ-Ziq vs. the Auteurs was one of the most high-profile examples of the remix-by-obliteration movement, a burgeoning hobby for many electronica producers in which the reworking of a pop song would bear no resemblance to -- or trace of -- the original.

Though the EP was hardly a prime mover in the sales category, Virgin signed Paradinas to a hefty contract and gave him his own Planet Mu sublabel to release his own work as well as develop similar-minded artists. Written into his own contract was a provision for unlimited recording under different names, and during 1995 Paradinas definitely took it to task: he unveiled three aliases and released as many albums in less than a year's time. The nu-skool electro label Clear released his debut single as Tusken Raiders early in the year; it mined the fascination with Star Wars and electro music shared by producers like Global Communication, Aphex Twin, and James Lavelle, head of Mo' Wax Records. Clear also released the first Paradinas alias full-length, Jake Slazenger's MakesARacket, later in 1995. Although they were still audible, the LP downplayed his electro influences in favor of some rather cheesy synthesizer figures and a previously unheard debt to jazz-funk.

The distortion reappeared on Paradinas' second LP of the year, Spatula Freak by Kid Spatula. The first American-only release of a Paradinas album (it appeared on Jonah Sharp's San Francisco-based Reflective Records), its sound had the metallic feel of the first two µ-Ziq LPs but with a less-dense production job. Just one month after Spatula Freak, Paradinas released his first proper µ-Ziq LP for a major label, In Pine Effect. The album included tracks recorded from 1993 to 1995, and though it was quite a varied album, the distance appeared to give it quite a disjointed feel.

Paradinas spent 1996 releasing a second Jake Slazenger album (Das Ist Groovy Beat Ja? for Warp) and his first as Gary Moscheles (Shaped to Make Your Life Easier for Belgium's SSR/Crammed Discs). Both LPs journeyed further down the queasy-listening route of the first Slazenger record, with departures into '80s-style party funk and surprisingly straight-ahead soul-jazz. He also owned a half-share in the Rephlex-released Expert Knob Twiddlers (credited as Mike & Rich), the fruit of Paradinas' 1994 recordings with the Aphex Twin.

Paradinas entered 1997 ready to undertake the most ambitious style makeover in his career: the fusion of his home-listening techno with the hypertensive rhythms of street-level drum'n'bass. One year earlier, Aphex Twin had released a single of schizophrenic jungle noodlings ("Hangable Auto Bulb"), and Tom Jenkinson's Squarepusher project had provided the first convincing headphone drum'n'bass act. Paradinas waded into the pool with Urmur Bile Trax, Vols. 1-2, a double EP also released as one full-length compact disc. Though the changeover wasn't completely convincing, the next µ-Ziq full-length more than made up for expectations. Lunatic Harness presented a complete synthesis of the many elements in Paradinas' career, from synth-jazz-funk and beatbox electro through to ambient techno and jungle.

Paradinas and µ-Ziq were introduced to many rock fans after he toured America as the support act for Björk. This tour influenced 1999's Royal Astronomy, which focused on acid techno and hip-hop influences. Issued in 2003, Bilious Paths became the first µ-Ziq release to arrive on Paradinas' own Planet Mu label. The dissolution of his relationship inspired his unrelentingly dark 2007 album Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique. Paradinas' Planet Mu duties and his Heterotic project with wife Lara Rix-Martin -- whose debut album, Love & Devotion, arrived in early 2013 -- were among the reasons µ-Ziq took a break until the release of the juke-influenced XTEP and rave-inspired full-length Chewed Corners, both of which arrived in 2013. That year's Somerset Avenue Tracks (1992-1995) compilation celebrated µ-Ziq's 20 years of recording, and collected unreleased tracks from the beginning of his career. Rediffusion appeared in 2014, and XTLP, compiling both XTEP and Rediffusion, followed in 2015. Two digital collections of rare or unreleased recordings, RY30 Trax and Aberystwyth Marine, both appeared in 2016. Following in this vein, Challenge Me Foolish, a collection of tracks dating from the late '90s, was released in 2018, this time on CD and vinyl.


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A surprisingly varied collection of new-school electro-funk. Paradinas' Slazenger sound is sparser, with funky machine breaks and goofy synth melodies dominating. Material splits pretty cleanly between dancefloor fare and more armchair-oriented tunes, and its the latter direction, not surprisingly, that proves most interesting. Makesaracket feels like Paradinas having some fun with making music and letting the bouncy ideas flow like fine wine. There is some truly playful tunes on here that remind me of the Mike & Rich collaboration, Expert Knob Twiddlers. Get Up A for instance. Stupid Wanker is an extremely class track and I was expecting something menacing and loud like Mr. Angry but instead got a sweet track with awesome driving percussion against more emotional synth lines and electronic blurbs that turned out excellently. Megaphonk sounds like an extended intro for a children's TV show in the 90's. Definitely a great addition to any µ-Ziq fan's list.



 Jake Slazenger - Makesaracket  (flac 430mb)

01 Megaphonk 7:00
02 Get Up R 5:57
03 Stupid Wanker 5:32
04 Gary's Birthday 6:04
05 Daytime Kiss 7:55
06 Erp 5:35
07 Wyatt 5:31
08 Flod 7:24
09 Bolus 5:31
10 Feet 6:46
11 Five Alive 5:43
12 Lux 7:44

 Jake Slazenger - Makesaracket   (ogg  118mb)

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Michael Paradinas' second album under the Jake Slazenger alias is much more subdued than the usual techno-racket µ-Ziq is known for. Most of the first Slazenger album explored early-'80s electro -- that's all here as well (and it sounds just as dated) -- but several of the tracks go much farther back in time as a springboard for some mad keyboard vamps. "Supafunk" could have been lifted from a Jimmy Smith album of the '60s and "Hot Fumes" keys off blaxploitation funk. It makes one wonder whether an artist can be experimental and enjoyable when using all this cringe-worthy synth, but in the end, Paradinas pulls it off.



Jake Slazenger - Das Ist Ein Groovybeat, Ja (flac  432mb)

01 Hung Like A Bull 6:50
02 Supafunk 5:19
03 The Big Easy 5:25
04 Lumpback Raider 5:46
05 Nautilus 6:20
06 King Of The Beats 6:09
07 Gratuit 7:27
08 Choin 7:16
09 Sabbaf 5:20
10 Hot Fumes 3:13
11 Come On You Slaz 6:19
12 Slowdance 7:49

Jake Slazenger - Das Ist Ein Groovybeat, Ja     (ogg  161mb)

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Mike Paradinas was wise to release Nautilus under his Jake Slazenger alias, as three of the four songs are in the vein of the funky work he featured on the Jake Slazenger Makesaracket album. The title track is one of the standout tracks from the second Slazenger album Das Ist Ein Groovybeat, Ja?. While The track follows the light, airy style of the Gary Moscheles one-off Shaped to Make Your Life Easier, it benefits from a stronger arrangement and fuller production. Clear, chirping sounds and wobbly bass pour out of the song with great energy. Where the Moscheles album settled on lo-fi, albeit fun, repetition, "Nautilus" rockets out of the gate. "Slaz Thing" is more controlled brilliance, as clanging robotic sounds and throbbing, distorted bass mingle with fuzzy synthesized organ sounds and a comical, whiny fake saxophone. If it gets a bit grating, that's part of the Slazenger attack. "The Penultimate" introduces an entertaining rap sample of "this is the ultimate/I can't go for it." The song's down-tempo grooves, laid back tone, and wacky wah-wah style suggest a hip-hop score to an old Atari 2600 game. "Marks Made in China" is rather uncharacteristic of a Slazenger creation. The song's dark sonic sludge and ominous pounding crunch would seem better fitted to Bluff Limbo or the first Kid Spatula album, Spatula Freak. Nautilus certainly doesn't represent Paradinas' best work, but it's wild exuberance and eclectic charms make it a worthwhile EP.



Jake Slazenger - Megaphonk, Nautilus (flac  302mb)

01 Megaphonk (Alternate Version) 5:20
02 Hyperjunk 8:59
03 Muddy Tractor 5:15

04 Nautilus 6:17
05 Slaz Thing 6:07
06 The Penultimate 4:34
07 Marks Made In China 9:05

08 Pewter Dragon 4:26
09 On The Street 3:55

Jake Slazenger - Megaphonk, Nautilus  (ogg 114mb)

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First things first, there is no Gary Moscheles. Gary Moscheles is actually Mike Paradinas operating under a pseudonym, but isn't Paradinas always operating under a pseudonym, as µ-ziq, Kid Spatula, Jake Slazenger, or a variety of other alter egos? Gary Moscheles presents an extremely funky side to Paradinas' electronic trickery. Sounding like warped, comic jazz pieces and full of goofy samples, Gary Moscheles' music suggests he's wearing a leisure suit while he's manning his analog gadgets. Xylophones and piano feature on "Mamborama," suggesting a '70s tropical paradise. Other songs focus on grooves that approach disco, swing, and bossa nova. Some of the tracks never really get going, but that's probably Paradinas's intention. "Mamblues" is one such song; it implodes whenever the energy gets too high, acting out power loss effects. The overall feel of the album is quite witty. One gets the impression these songs were meant to be played as the score to some sort of cantina scene in an extremely low-budget, sci-fi movie. Most of the tracks utilize a great deal of repetition in their samples and sounds; on µ-ziq albums, Paradinas uses repetition toward later emotional epiphanies. Here, the repetition might seem grating, unless a listener is expecting wacky, dance music. "Gary's Groove" displays this repetition with nearly two minutes of a drum sample play repeatedly with little variation in the surrounding music. The track that really explains Paradinas' motive as Gary Moscheles is "Good Bye Jazz People." The song has Paradinas talk-singing via heavy voice processing, as he thanks his friends, family, and God in strange, hilarious style over funky electronic grooves. It takes an astute, patient listener to find the joy in such vibe-heavy electronica. Even then, it takes a sense of humor to completely enjoy Paradinas's cool cacophony. Shaped to Make Your Life Easier is a funny, jazzy pleasure; the repetitive nature of the music simply means most listeners won't give the album frequent enough spins.



Gary Moscheles - Shaped to Make Your Life Easier (flac  274mb)

01 Mamborama 6:40
02 Play It Again, Sonny 4:11
03 Mamblues 2:33
04 Plot Thickener 4:36
05 Surprise Horn Pt.2 3:37
06 Funk Yo Ass 6:24
07 Walk It Like This 4:51
08 Gary's Groove 1:51
09 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 3:30
10 Johnny Hates Jazz 3:30
11 Good Bye Jazz People 2:37
12 Gary's House 5:45

Gary Moscheles - Shaped to Make Your Life Easier (ogg  103mb)

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Dec 28, 2018

RhoDeo 1851 Grooves

Hello,


Founded in 1957 by a white brother and sister, Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton (hence St-Ax), it had turned its McLemore Avenue studios, carved from a converted cinema, into an oasis of racial harmony in a city still riven by segregation. The label's mixed house band, Booker T and the MGs, was emblematic. "Colour never came through the doors," said the MGs' white guitarist Steve Cropper, whose terse, stinging licks helped define the Stax sound, and who would co-write some of its biggest hits.

"Racism has long been the grit that produces musical pearls in Memphis," observes Gordon, who frames Stax's tale within the wider narrative of the civil rights struggle. The 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King on the balcony of Memphis's Lorraine motel, a musicians' hangout, soured the atmosphere inside an organisation still reeling from the death of its star turn, Otis Redding, a few months previously.

Redding was one of many talents to benefit from the open-door policy of Stewart, a banker by profession, and Axton, who ran a record shop in the cinema's former snack bar, and who became the label's antennae and mother hen. Otis had arrived as driver for guitarist Johnny Jenkins, but stunned the studio with his audition piece, These Arms of Mine. They cut the song then and there. Redding's aching vocals, straight from the pews of a southern congregation, came with winning charisma and ferocious onstage presence. After Otis, everyone (including the Beatles) wanted a piece of the Stax sound.

The international success of Redding, Sam and Dave and the MGs themselves – 1962's Green Onions was an early triumph – brought acclaim and problems. A rapturously received 1967 European package tour opened the musicians' eyes to the scale of their achievements and the corresponding shortfall in their earnings. Worse was to follow. Atlantic Records had been Stax's partner since Carla Thomas's 1961 breakout, Gee Whiz, had brought the New York label calling, eager for distribution rights. Atlantic's sale to Warners in 1967 activated an unnoticed contractual clause that awarded Stax's entire back catalogue to Atlantic in what Gordon terms "an act of corporate homicide".
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The devastation continued with King's assassination. The ensuing riots and arson left the Stax studios unscathed, but, as singer Rufus Thomas put it, "the complexion of everything changed". Determined to rebuild, Stewart entrusted operations to vice president Al Bell, a former radio DJ turned civil rights activist described by Gordon as "the Otis Redding of business". Bell envisioned Stax as a model of black advancement through economic empowerment, and created an instant catalogue with the simultaneous release of 27 albums by almost as many new acts. For capital, a controlling interest was sold to Paramount Pictures, the first of several complex deals he and Stewart engineered.

Stax's open door promptly slammed shut. Harassment of musicians by local thugs ensured that. Bell's solution was Johnny Baylor, an ex-special ops ranger who fixed problems with gun and fist. The harassment stopped but Baylor became a toxic presence, on one occasion hospitalising a musician for ordering too much room service.

"The family feeling was suddenly gone," said sax player Wayne Jackson. "There were people with guns in the house. They put up a big fence with a guard: Fort Stax."

The new regime made exiles of stalwarts like Axton and Cropper but Stax prospered, with massive hits from Johnny Taylor, the Staple Singers and Ike Hayes, the last promoted from backroom songwriter to unlikely superstar. Bell celebrated with 1972's Wattstax, an all-day festival at LA's giant Coliseum. Compered by the Rev Jessie Jackson (an old Bell buddy), Wattstax was part label showcase, part black pride rally, and spawned a celebrated documentary film.

Behind Stax's hip, happening facade lay a bloated organisation of 200 employees, where excess flourished and rumours of gangsterism and payola flew, especially after the FBI picked up Baylor with $129,000 cash and a cheque from Stax for $500,000. The IRS opened investigations. Owed $10m, the Union Planters Bank pressed for bankruptcy and the closure that arrived early in 1976. Ike Hayes, on whom "money had rained" lost his back catalogue and was soon also declared bankrupt.

When Stax Records had renewed the contract of its biggest star, Isaac Hayes, in 1972, it sugar-coated the deal with a custom-built, gold-plated Cadillac Eldorado. Thirty-year-old Hayes had recently become the first black musician to win an Oscar for his Theme from Shaft. His albums of "symphonic soul" sold by the millions – the most recent, Black Moses, had come in a lavish cover that unfolded into a cross, framing the former meat-packer as an Old Testament prophet, clad in biblical robes and wraparound shades. Hubris? Hayes's gilded Caddy marked the pinnacle of Stax's fortunes, from which the company soon fell into bankruptcy and ruin, dragged down by corruption and financial excess. For a label that had created some of the greatest pop of the 20th century, making the careers of Otis Redding, Sam and Dave, Wilson Pickett, the Staple Singers and scores more, it was a shocking fall from grace.

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At nine discs and 244 tracks, The Complete Stax-Volt Singles: 1968-1971 is far too exhaustive for casual fans, but that's not who the set is designed for -- it's made for the collector. Featuring every A-side the label released during those nine years, as well as several B-sides, the set is a definitive portrait of gritty, deep Southern soul. Many of the genre's major names plus many terrific one-shot wonders are showcased in terrific sound and augmented with an in-depth booklet. For any serious soul or rock collector, it's an essential set, since Stax-Volt was not only a musically revolutionary label, its roster was deep with talent, which means much of the music on this collection is first-rate. .



VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 5 (flac   465mb)

501 Ollie & The Nightingales - Bracing Myself For The Fall 2:53
502 William Bell & Carla Thomas - All I Have To Do Is Dream 3:12
503 Jeanne And The Darlings - Singing About Love 2:20
504 Chris And Shack - Goodies 2:40
505 Barbara Lewis - Just The Way You Are Today 3:31
506 Little Sonny - The Creeper Returns 4:12
507 Carla Thomas - Guide Me Well 3:51
508 The Staple Singers - Give A Damn 3:06
509 Johnnie Taylor - Steal Away 3:25
510 Margie Joseph - Your Sweet Lovin' 3:36
511 Jones & Blumenberg - I Forgot To Remember 3:40
512 David Porter - Can't See You When I Want To 4:30
513 Carla Thomas - Never Be True 4:16
514 Albert King - Can't You See What You're Doing To Me 3:38
515 Rufus Thomas - Sixty Minute Man (Part 2) 3:30
516 Rufus Thomas - The Preacher And The Bear 3:51
517 Booker T. & The MGs - Something 3:31
518 The Mad Lads - Seeing Is Believin' 4:10
519 Roz Ryan - You're My Only Temptation 2:35
520 Paul Thompson - What I Don't Know Won't Hurt Me 2:55
521 Branding Iron - Right, Tight And Out Of Sight 2:59
522 John KaSandra - (What's Under) The Natural Do 3:00

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol. 2 5 (ogg   183mb)

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VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 6 (flac   465mb)

601 Eddie Floyd - My Girl 3:19
602 Mavis Staples - I Have Learned To Do Without You 4:09
603 The T.S.U. Toronadoes - Play The Music Toronadoes 2:33
604 William Bell - Lovely Soldier 3:58
605 The Emotions - Heart Association 3:01
606 Isaac Hayes - I Stand Accused 4:02
607 The Staple Singers - Brand New Day 3:42
608 Margie Joseph -Sweeter Tomorrow 3:12
609 Bernie Hayes - Cool Strut 2:54
610 The Newcomers - You Put The Sunshine Back In My World 3:03
611 The Bar-Kays -  Montego Bay 2:32
612 Rudy Robinson & The Hungry Five - Got It Together (Parts 1 & 2) 5:27
613 Little Sonny - Wade In The Water 3:14
614 The Nightingales - You're Movin' Much Too Fast 2:50
615 Eddie Floyd - The Best Years Of My Life 3:03
616 Johnnie Taylor - I Am Somebody (Part 2) 3:18
617 Carla Thomas - I Loved You Like I Love My Very Life 2:45
618 Reggie Milner - Soul Machine 2:25
619 The Temprees - (Follow Her) Rules And Regulations 2:52
620 Rufus Thomas - (Do The) Push And Pull (Part 1) 3:14
621 Charlene And The Soul Serenaders - Love Changes 3:50
622 The Soul Children - Put Your World In My World (Best Of Two Worlds) 2:54
623 The Staple Singers - Love Plentiful 2:30

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 6 (ogg   173mb)

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VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 7 (flac   452mb)

701 The Staple Singers - Heavy Make Too Happy (Sha-Na-Boom Boom) 2:58
702 The Staple Singers - Who Took The Merry Out Of Christmas 2:29
703 Shack - Too Many Lovers 2:43
704 The Emotions - Black Christmas 2:46
705 Isaac Hayes - The Mistletnoe And Me 3:56
706 Barbara Lewis - Ask The Lonely 3:11
707 Johnnie Taylor - Judy's Got Your Girl And Gone 3:00
708 The Soul Children - Finish Me Off 3:35
709 Eddie Floyd - Oh, How It Rained 3:10
710 Isaac Hayes - The Look Of Love 3:18
711 Ernie Hines - Electrified Love 3:06
712 Booker T. & The MGs - Melting Pot 3:50
713 Barbara Lewis - That's The Way I Like It (I Like It That Way) 3:04
714 Jean Knight - Mr. Big Stuff 2:27
715 The Emotions - You Make Me Want To Love You 3:12
716 Margie Joseph - Stop! In The Name Of Love 4:40
717 Johnnie Taylor - I Don't Wanna Lose You 3:55
718 The Temprees - (Girl) I Love You 3:12
719 Rufus Thomas - The World Is Round 3:12
720 William Bell - A Penny For Your Thoughts 3:00
721 Isaac Hayes - Never Can Say Goodbye 3:32
722 The Nightingales - I Don't Want To Be Like My Daddy 3:20

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 7 (ogg   169mb)

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VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 8 (flac   453mb)

801 The Staple Singers - You've Got To Earn It 3:28
802 The Limitations - Hold On To It 2:33
803 The Dramatics - Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get 3:30
804 Branding Iron - Born Too Late 2:33
805 Jimmy Hughes - Just Ain't Strong As I Used To Be (You Done Fed Me Sumpin') 3:00
806 Margie Joseph - That Other Woman Got My Man And Gone 3:31
807 The Emotions - If You Think It (You May As Well Do It) 3:00
808 Calvin Scott - Shame On The Family Name 2:45
809 Eddie Floyd - Blood Is Thicker Than Water 2:40
810 Johnnie Taylor - Hijackin' Love 3:17
811 Melvin Van Peebles - Sweetback's Theme 3:25
812 Rufus Thomas - The Breakdown (Part 1) 3:11
813 The Newcomers - Pin The Tail On The Donkey 2:59
814 Lee Sain - Them Hot Pants 3:05
815 Little Milton - If That Ain't A Reason (For Your Woman To Leave You) 3:22
816 Shack - It's Good To Be Careful (But It's Better To Be Loved) 2:50
817 Ilana - Where Would You Be Today 3:15
818 Albert King - Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven 3:45
819 The Soul Children - Got To Get Away From It All 3:20
820 United Image - Love's Creeping Up On Me 2:24
821 The Emotions - Show Me How 3:04
822 David Porter - If I Give It Up, I Want It Back 2:28
823 Little Sonny - A Woman Named Trouble 4:25

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 8 (ogg   173mb)

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VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 9 (flac   439mb)

901 Eddie Giles - Losing Boy 3:04
902 The Staple Singers - Respect Yourself 3:30
903 Hot Sauce - I'll Kill A Brick (About My Man) 2:45
904 Jean Knight - You Think You're Hot Stuff 2:25
905 William Bell - All For The Love Of A Woman 3:12
906 Isaac Hayes - Theme From Shaft 3:15
907 The MGs - Jamaica, This Morning 3:06
908 The Mad Lads - Gone! The Promises Of Yesterday 3:41
909 Major Lance - Girl, Come On Home 2:38
910 Joni Wilson - (Let Hurt Put You In The) Loser's Seat 3:15
911 The Temprees - My Baby Love 2:54
912 The Leaders - How Do You Move A Mountain 2:20
913 Black Nasty - Black Nasty Boogie (Part 6) 2:37
914 Rufus Thomas - Do The Funky Penguin (Part 1) 3:08
915 Carla Thomas - You've Got A Cushion To Fall On 3:36
916 The Dramatics - Get Up And Get Down 3:10
917 The Bar-Kays - Son Of Shaft 3:13
918 L.V. Johnson - Don't Cha Mess With My Money, My Honey, Or My Woman 3:38
919 Eric Mercury - I Can Smell That Funky Music 3:00
920 Calvin Scott - A Sadness For Things 3:15
921 Little Milton - That's What Love Will Make You Do 3:53
922 Johnnie Taylor - Standing In For Judy 3:42

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 9 (ogg   167mb)

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Dec 27, 2018

RhoDeo 1851 Roots

Hello, .

Today's artist is a seemingly ageless Cuban percussionist/bandleader could energize packed behemoth arenas such as the Hollywood Bowl. A master conguero, who at his best creates an incantatory spell rooted in Cuban religious rituals, quietly seating himself before his congas and soloing with total command over the rhythmic spaces between the beats while his band pumps out an endless vamp. He has been hugely influential as a leader, running durable bands that combine the traditional charanga with jazz-oriented brass, wind, and piano solos, featuring such future notables as Chick Corea and Hubert Laws. He also reached out into R&B, rock, and electric jazz at times in his long career. .......N'Joy

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Ramón "Mongo" Santamaría Rodríguez (April 7, 1917 – February 1, 2003) was a rumba quinto master and an Afro-Cuban Latin jazz percussionist. He is most famous for being the composer of the jazz standard "Afro Blue", recorded by John Coltrane among others. In 1950 he moved to New York City where he played with Perez Prado, Tito Puente, Cal Tjader, Fania All Stars, etc. He was an integral figure in the fusion of Afro-Cuban rhythms with R&B and soul, paving the way for the boogaloo era of the late 1960s. His 1963 hit rendition of Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man" (recorded on December 17, 1962) was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998.

Santamaría learned rumba as a kid in the streets of Havana's Jesús María barrio. He reminisced: "In the neighborhood where I came from we had all kinds of music, mostly from Africa. We did not leave it alone; we changed it our way. The music we made dealt with religion and conversation. The drum was our tool and we used it for everything" (1979: 19). Gerard points out: "Santamaría, like other drummers of his generation, learned music in the streets by observing different drummers. When he started playing professionally, he learned on the job. His approach was utilitarian, not theoretical". Santamaría was mentored on bongos and rumba quinto by Clemente "Chicho" Piquero, who played in Beny Moré's band. He recalled: "I would go with Chicho and play the tumbadora and also the quinto. I would play everything because I learned a lot from Chicho—because he could play everything"

When Santamaría soloed in jazz, you heard brilliant phrasing with roots firmly in the folkloric rumba, the authentic rumba of the street where he grew up. In addressing that authenticity, he once told Downbeat Magazine: "You can't learn to play things like guaguancó here.... You have to have been where it came from.... You can't listen to records and get those feelings". Santamaría recorded some of the very first recorded folkloric rumbas. Because he recorded for mainstream jazz labels, his folkloric records were consistently available to the public. Santamaría's albums tended to list the personnel and their instruments; so record buyers came to know other Cuban rumberos, such as Armando Peraza, Francisco Aguabella, Julito Collazo, Carlos Vidal Bolado, Modeto Duran and Pablo Mozo. The 10 inch 33 1/3 rpm phonorecord Afro-Cuban Drums by Santamaría was recorded in SMC's New York City studios on November 3, 1952. Santamaría's next recordings with folkloric rumba were on Changó (re-issued as Drums and Chants) recorded in New York (1954). Yambú (1958), Mongo (1959), and Bembé (1960) followed.

Santamaría's quinto phrasing was dynamic and creative; he had an unmistakable sound, that was uniquely his own. He did not analyze his personal style: "When I play I don't know how I do it, or what I do ... I just play" (2001: 29).[5] The following example is an excerpt from a quinto performance by Santamaría on his composition "Mi guaguancó" (1959). The excerpt shows variations on two main motifs, marked as A and B. Santamaría's repetition of what is typically a secondary phrase (B), makes it the primary motif here.

Santamaría began playing bongos with Septeto Beloña in 1937. In the 1940s he worked in the house band of the prestigious Tropicana nightclub. When Chicho could not join a tour in Mexico in the late 1940s, he recommended Santamaría for the job. Mexico opened Santamaría up to the wider world beyond his island home. After returning from Mexico in 1950, Santamaría moved to New York City, where he became Tito Puente's conga player. In 1957 Mongo Santamaría joined Cal Tjader's Latin jazz combo.

In 1959 Santamaría recorded "Afro Blue," the first jazz standard built upon a typical African 3:2 cross-rhythm, or hemiola. The song begins with the bass repeatedly playing 6 cross-beats per each measure of 12/8, or 6 cross-beats per 4 main beats—6:4 (two cells of 3:2). The following example shows the original ostinato "Afro Blue" bass line. The slashed noteheads indicate the main beats (not bass notes), where you would normally tap your foot to "keep time."

In 1960 Mongo went to Havana, Cuba with Willie Bobo to record two albums "Mongo In Havana" and "Bembe y Nuestro Hombre En La Habana." After recording, he returned to New York City to form the charanga orquestra La Sabrosa.

In late 1962 Chick Corea had given notice and Santamaría needed a pianist to fill in for the upcoming weekend gigs. Herbie Hancock got the temporary job. Hancock recalls what happened the night that Santamaría discovered "Watermelon Man" the only tune of Santamaría's to reach the top of the pop charts:

The sudden success of the song (which Mongo Santamaria recorded on December 17, 1962) propelled Santamaría into his niche of blending Afro-Cuban and African American musics. Santamaría went on to record Cuban-flavored versions of popular R&B and Motown songs.

Santamaria died in Miami, Florida, after suffering a stroke, at the age of 85. He is buried in Woodlawn Park Cemetery and Mausoleum (now Caballero Rivero Woodlawn Park North Cemetery and Mausoleum) in Miami, Florida.



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At the time that Sabroso was recorded, Mongo Santamaria's group was essentially a charanga band with two trumpets added, a combination that works quite well. The group has superior playing by Jose "Chombo" Silva on both violin and tenor (helping "Para Ti" to become a classic), two little-known but talented trumpeters (Louis Valizan and Marcus Cabuto), the great flutist Rolando Lozano, pianist Rene Hernandez, bassist Victor Venegas, and Willie Bobo on drums. Pete Escovedo is one of the background singers as Rudi Calzado takes the lead on a few numbers but does not dominate. There are many fine individual moments on this joyous and infectious set.



Mongo Santamaria - Sabroso! (flac  403mb)

01 Que Meravilloso (Pachanga) 2:43
02 En La Felicidad (Charanga) 2:04
03 Pachanga Pá Ti (Pachanga) 2:21
04 Tulibamba (Charanga) 3:58
05 Mambo De Cuco (Pachanga) 3:50
06 El Bote (Descarga) 3:56
07 Pito Pito (Mambo) 2:43
08 Guaguanco Mania (Guaguanco) 2:30
09 Ja, Ja-Ja (Charanga) 3:00
10 Tula Hula (Pachanga) 2:36
11 Dimelo (Charanga) 2:32
12 A La Luna Me Voy (Charanga) 3:05
13 Para Ti (Descarga) 6:02
Bonus
14 Afro Blue 3:57
15 Yambú 4:04
16 Imaribayo 2:04
17 YeYe 3:00
18 Ayenye 2:39
19 Timbales Y Bongo 7:13
20 Columbia 4:44

 Mongo Santamaria - Sabroso!  (ogg  177mb)

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Applying their famous two-fer philosophy to the digital era, Fantasy combines Mighty Mongo and Viva Mongo! on a single CD, showcasing two somewhat different slants on Mongo Santamaria's music during a period of exploration. Mighty Mongo leans more to Mongo's jazz side without sacrificing his Afro-Cuban rhythmic base, while Viva Mongo has a more distinctly ethnic Cuban sound with Rudy Calzado's solo vocals and the band's group chanting, Rolando Lozano's wooden flute riding playfully above the ensemble, and the traditional Cuban use of string counterlines. On Mighty Mongo, "Descarga at the Black Hawk" sets an especially tasty groove, with some timbales/congas/cymbals action on an extended vamp. Lozano shines in an extended flute solo on "Bacoso" before a scorcher of a percussion battle develops, while composer/pianist Joao Donato also doubles on trombone on "Sabor." Viva Mongo's highlights include "Las Guajiras," a relaxed spellbinder at a guajira tempo; "Merengue Changa," a stupefying merger of two different rhythmic feelings; and the appropriately titled "Mambo Terrifico." Jose "Chombo" Silva, the Cuban Stan Getz worshipper who also evokes Coleman Hawkins on occasion, careens pleasingly on both albums. Of the two, Viva Mongo is perhaps the more vital record, but it's a close call; both are vibrant expressions of Mongo's art. Recorded in 1962 at the Black Hawk in San Francisco.



Mongo Santamaria - At the Black Hawk (flac  461mb)

Mighty Mongo
01 Bluchanga 7:56
02 Tenderly 4:00
03 Descarga At The Black Hawk 7:28
04 Bacoso 8:51
05 Sabor 4:03
06 All The Things You Are 4:53

¡Viva Mongo!
07 Pachanga Twist 3:20
08 Las Guajiras 7:43
09 Para Ti 3:01
10 Body And Soul 5:35
11 Merengue Changa 3:40
12 Dulce Sueño 2:35
13 Mambo Terrifico 2:50
14 Close Your Eyes 5:44

 Mongo Santamaria - At the Black Hawk  (ogg  199mb)

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The two records that make up Our Man in Havana (the other date was originally called Bembe) were recorded in 1960 during a visit to Cuba by Mongo Santamaria and Willie Bobo. The first set is superb, featuring an unusual mixture of instruments for a Cuban band: two trumpets, flute, piano, tres (Nino Rivera), bass, timbales, bongos, guiro, conga, and two vocalists. The playing by the local musicians is of high quality, and the ten selections are quite enjoyable. Unfortunately though, that project is combined with the cuts from Bembe, which are in a very different style. The latter project has the music performed entirely by vocalists, other than the percussion of Santamaria and Bobo. Consisting of folk melodies and religious songs, with the emphasis totally on the chanting and singing, the music is intriguing from a historical standpoint but the jazz content is nil on this emotional date (which has Merceditas Valdes taking the vocal on four numbers). So, overall, this is definitely a mixed bag.



  Mongo Santamaria - Our Man In Havana ( flac  443mb)

01 Jamaicuba 3:27
02 Manila 4:42
03 He Guapacha 4:08
04 Cha Cha Rock 3:47
05 Vengan Pollos 4:59
06 Barandanga :16
07 Linda Guajira 3:06
08 Vamos A Gozar 2:34
09 Miss Patti Cha Cha 4:15
10 Viva La Felicidad 2:31
11 Tele Mina For Chango 3:00
12 Olla De For Olla 3:48
13 Yemaya Olodo For Ollo 3:38
14 Yeye-O For Ochun 4:10
15 Wolenche For Chango 2:47
16 Aqua Limpia 3:40
17 Ochun Mene 4:10
18 Mexico 3:20
19 Manana Son Manana 4:06
20 Compliaciones 3:47

  Mongo Santamaria - Our Man In Havana (ogg    199mb)

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Mongo at the Village Gate finds Mongo Santamaria entering the boogaloo era with a variety of funky pieces that show the influence of R&B and soul-jazz without losing the group's roots in Cuban music. The infectious live set teams the conguero with trumpeter Marty Sheller, the reeds of Pat Patrick and Bobby Capers, pianist Rodgers Grant, bassist Victor Venegas, drummer Frank Hernandez, and the percussion of Chihuahua Martinez and Julian Cabrera. Such tunes as "Fatback," "Mongo's Groove," and "Creole" have happy, soulful, and simple melodies. This is one of Marty Sheller's best dates on trumpet, while Santamaria takes "My Sound" as a colorful unaccompanied solo. A remake of "Para Ti" is a welcome addition.



Mongo Santamaria - Mongo at the Village    (flac  291mb)

01 Introduction By "Symphony Sid" 0:40
02 El Toro 6:13
03 Fatback 5:59
04 Mongo's Groove 3:07
05 Creole 2:29
06 The Jungle Bit 7:13
07 My Sound 2:57
08 The Morning After 6:40
09 Nothing For Nothing 7:13
Bonus
10 Para Ti 5:14

Mongo Santamaria - Mongo at the Village (ogg  130mb)

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Hey! Let's Party represents one of percussionist Mongo Santamaria's first and most engaging plunges into the world of contemporary pop, galvanizing well-known chart smashes with the energy and abandon of Latin soul. It's a simple formula that proved remarkably successful and flexible across a series of likeminded LPs -- Santamaria approaches texts like "Walk on By" and "I Got You (I Feel Good)" with deep respect and understanding, creating soulful, righteous rhythms that snake in and out of the original melodies with brilliant precision. Even battered warhorses like Glenn Miller's "In the Mood" breathe new life, proving Santamaria's uncanny capacity for making the familiar funky.



Mongo Santamaria - Hey! Let's Party    (flac  218mb)

01 Walk On By 2:58
02 I Got You (I Feel Good) 2:48
03 In The Mood 3:24
04 Baila Dance 3:58
05 Louie, Louie 2:16
06 (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction 3:45
07 Hey! 2:50
08 Call Me 2:45
09 El Bikini 2:27
10 Shotgun 3:27

Mongo Santamaria - Hey! Let's Party (ogg  88mb)

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Dec 26, 2018

RhoDeo 1851 Aetix

Hello,  ah yes Xmas daze...


Today's artists unwittingly or not, personified the ugly side of rave culture. They were thugs, purely and simply -- they brought out the latent violence that lay beneath the surface of any drug culture, even one as seemingly beatific as England's late-'80s/early-'90s rave scene. Under the leadership of vocalist Shaun Ryder, the group sounded and acted like thugs. Ryder's lyrics were twisted and surrealistic, loaded with bizarre pop culture references, drug slang, and menacing sexuality.Their music relied heavily on the sound and rhythm of house music, spiked with '70s soul licks and swirling '60s psychedelia. It was bright, colorful music that had fractured melodies that never quite gelled into cohesive songs. ......N'Joy

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The band were signed to Factory Records after passing a demo tape to Phil Saxe, a trader at Manchester Arndale who was on friendly terms with Mike Pickering, a DJ at the Haçienda nightclub. Saxe became the band's manager.

Their first release was the "Forty Five EP", often called the "Delightful EP" after its first track. It was released on Factory Records in September 1985. Their first album, Squirrel and G-Man Twenty Four Hour Party People Plastic Face Carnt Smile (White Out), was released in 1987 and was produced by John Cale. This was followed by two further albums: Bummed, in 1988, produced by Martin Hannett, and Pills 'n' Thrills and Bellyaches, in 1990, produced by Paul Oakenfold and Steve Osborne. The latter, recorded at Capitol Studios in Los Angeles, went platinum in the UK, selling more than 350,000 copies. Singles "Step On" and "Kinky Afro" from this album both reached number 5 in the UK singles chart.

By the late 1980s, the Happy Mondays were an important part of the Manchester music scene and personified rave culture. Numerous world tours meant the band had international success as well as massive success in their home country. The line-up of the band during this first and most important ten year phase never changed, and the six original members Shaun Ryder, Paul Ryder, Gary Whelan, Paul Davis, Mark Day and Mark "Bez" Berry remained a tight unit until the first incarnation came to an end in 1994.The band appeared on the bill at the 1990 Glastonbury Festival. In November of that year, Paul McCartney commented in NME: "I saw the Happy Mondays on TV, and they reminded me of the Beatles in their 'Strawberry Fields' phase."

Musically, the band fused indie pop guitars with a rhythmic style that owed much to house music, Krautrock, funk and northern soul. Much of their music was remixed by popular DJs, emphasizing the dance influences even further. In terms of style and dress, they crossed hippy fashion and ideals with 1970s glamour. Sartorially and musically, the band helped to encourage the psychedelic revival associated with acid house.[citation needed] One of their most popular songs was "Lazyitis (One Armed Boxer)", featuring a surreal duet between Ryder and Karl Denver. In February 1991, Happy Mondays played at the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,[8] and famously went to meet Ronnie Biggs in Brazil with Piers Morgan, who at the time was a writer for The Sun newspaper. The Mondays also influenced many bands around the Northwest and beyond, including the Stone Roses, Oasis and the Charlatans. A multi-city US tour followed with the group returning home early in May 1991. By July that year they revealed details of a fourteen track 'official bootleg' live album, Baby Big Head, recorded in Leeds. The official record label release, Live followed later in the year.

Yes Please! followed in 1992, produced by Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth, recorded at Eddy Grant's studio in Barbados. The album was a commercial failure that bankrupted Factory Records.

What happened next

Happy Mondays disbanded in 1993, and Shaun Ryder and Bez formed Black Grape with ex-Paris Angels guitarist "Wags" (who would later go on to serve in the 1999–2000 reincarnation of the Mondays) and ex-Ruthless Rap Assassins star Kermit. Seven years passed, but in 1999 Happy Mondays re-formed,[14] with founding members Shaun Ryder, Paul Ryder, Gary Whelan and Mark "Bez" Berry minus Paul Davis and Mark Day. In the place of Day and Davis were Wags and a number of other session musicians including Ben Leach who had once been a member of The Farm, percussionist Lea Mullen and rapper "Nuts". Also joining the new line-up was soul diva Rowetta Satchell (who sang back-up on Pills, Thrills, and Bellyaches, and who would go on to have solo success). The band toured extensively in the UK and internationally, selling out the 20,000 capacity Manchester Arena and two nights at Brixton Academy and released of a new single, a cover version of the Thin Lizzy hit "The Boys Are Back in Town". The single reached number 24 in the UK Singles Chart. They provided support for Oasis on their "Standing on the Shoulder of Giants" arena tour, played at the Fuji Rock Festival in Japan, numerous European festivals including T in the Park and also toured Australia the same year. Although critically acclaimed and playing to sell-out crowds, the band once more ceased their activity in 2001 following the departure of bass player and founding member Paul Ryder.

A fictionalised depiction of the band is featured in the 2002 film 24 Hour Party People, with Danny Cunningham as Shaun Ryder and Paul Popplewell as Paul Ryder. Paul Ryder himself had a cameo role in the film as a gangster and Rowetta (who sang for the band on Pills 'n' Thrills and Bellyaches and Yes Please!) appeared in the film as herself.

What would follow is a number ' reunions' whenever the money ran out usually around original members Bez, Whelan and Shaun Ryder Latest news the band return to Australia in March 2019 for a series of dates across the country to perform their seminal 1990 album 'Pills 'N' Thrills And Bellyaches' musicians.

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Happy Mondays' debut album was in retrospect a false start, but not as much of one as has been claimed. Production by John Cale was an odd choice -- certainly fewer bands were out there who had less of an open connection to the Welsh legend's musical approach -- but the end results capture the cluttering mess of the band's approach well enough. The wild card is the presence of original member Paul Davis on keyboards, who adds some subtle touches throughout that make the band sound a touch more relaxed than they really were, as on "Oasis." (Bez wasn't around at this point -- but then again, was he ever around even when he was in the band?) Shaun Ryder certainly is well on his own way, though, his attitude-laden delivery already finding the perfect balance between random incomprehensibility, sharp images, and inspired nonsense. The album's standout track and more or less title cut "24 Hour Party People" -- ironically only included after the fact when the song "Desmond" had to be pulled for its blatant Beatles borrowing -- is a blast, a partying call to arms that is all about fun and chaos at once. If the remainder of the album can mostly be called a fusion of disco-tinged funk and Ryder's vocal insanity, though, it's still a great fusion, not quite the heights of the near future, but by no means a washout. The combination of slick and rough on songs like the well-groovy "Tart Tart" is offset by the quiet prettiness of the band at points. "Olive Oil" sounds a bit like a queasy Smiths song and both "Cob 20" and "Kuff Dam" almost sound a bit like the Cure. CD copies of the album include a variant of "Little Matchstick Owen" called "Little Matchstick Owen's Rap," which originally appeared as the B-side to "Tart Tart."



 Happy Mondays - Squirrel And G-Man Twenty Four Hour Party People (flac  215mb)

01 Kuff Dam 3:06
02 Tart Tart 4:25
03 'Enery 2:23
04 Russell 4:53
05 Olive Oil 2:37
06 Weekend S 2:23
07 Little Matchstick Owen 3:43
08 Oasis 3:46
09 24 Hr Party People 4:40
10 Cob 20 4:21

Happy Mondays - Squirrel And G-Man Twenty Four Hour Party People  (ogg   83mb)

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Only a year after the intermittently thrilling Squirrel and G-Man, Happy Mondays snapped into focus on its sophomore album, 1988's Bummed. "Focus" is an odd word for the persistently addled, violently hedonistic Mondays, yet Bummed has its own peculiar drug logic, loping into view with the two-stepping "Country Song," a cut so twisted it goes far beyond irony, then settling into the dense groove of "Moving In With," its hook buzzing and circling, causing a cacophony. Such vivid, concrete textures are a hallmark of producer Martin Hannett, the Mancunian legend who has been brought on board to give the Happy Mondays direction by doing the opposite of what he did with Joy Division. His production for Unknown Pleasures was stark, austere, but Bummed is all smeared colors and harsh edges, a fistful of razors and menace cutting viciously into the subconscious. This is nasty, nightmarish music delivered with a lascivious leer by Shaun Ryder, a hallucinatory accidental poet portrayed on the album's garish cover as some kind of harlot put out to pasture. Decadence has rarely sounded as dangerous as it did in the hands of the Mondays and this is where they reveled in that debauchery, pumping out stiff psychedelic funk as Ryder spat out rhymes of luck, lazyitis and fat lady wrestlers. Hannett's bright, brittle production amplifies everything, creating a swirling hyper-reality that's almost a sonic black hole sucking everything into its vortex -- slide guitars, sound clips from "Performance," maniacally looped drum machines, Beatles melodies, drums that are pushed to the front of the mix so it all is a relentless assault, from the ears down to the loins. As jagged and lacerating as all this is, there's a sense of evil glee, that the Mondays want to drag you down to their level, but there's no sense of seduction here; you're either with them or not, as Bummed is music for after you've already succumbed to the dark side. This remaster is amazing, more spacey, more thud on the drums , bass is a little crisper , Shaun's vocal clearer and the keys are more distinct.



Happy Mondays - Bummed (flac  452mb)

101 Country Song 3:24
102 Moving In With 3:36
103 Mad Cyril 4:36
104 Fat Lady Wrestlers 3:26
105 Performance 4:03
106 Brain Dead 3:10
107 Wrote For Luck 6:05
108 Bring A Friend 3:44
109 Do It Better 2:27
110 Lazyitis 2:50
111 Hallelujah 2:36
112 Holy Ghost 2:50
113 Clap Your Hands 3:30
114 Rave On (Club Mix) 5:38
115 Boom 2:57
116 Mad Cyril (Hello Girls) 3:53
117 Wrote For Luck (Club Mix) 5:46

Happy Mondays - Bummed  (ogg   154mb)

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Happy Mondays - Bummed Bonus (flac  387mb)

201 Wrote For Luck (7' Version) 3:43
202 Hallelujah (Club Mix) 6:28
203 Wrote For Luck (12" Version) 5:42
204 Hallelujah (MacColl Mix) 2:40
205 Lazyitis (One Armed Boxer) 3:53
206 WFL (Think About The Future) 7:12
207 Hallelujah (12" Version) 6:21
208 Kilamenjaro 6:17
209 WFL (Vince Clarke 12" Mix) 6:12
210 Hallelujah (Deadstock Mix) 7:51

Happy Mondays - Bummed Bonus   (ogg  134mb)

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This American-only release was something of a catchall, drawing together tracks from the breakthrough Madchester, Rave On EP plus the WFL and U.K. Hallelujah remix singles. The result is a good balance between the rambling and shambling funk slop that made the band's name and the more dancefloor-oriented revamps that won the group even more attention. Steve Lillywhite's initial mix of "Hallelujah" serves up something of a Brit music classic, sneaking in Kirsty MacColl's voice around the chorus even while Ryder and company carry out another massive stomp and shake. The next three tracks make up the balance of the Madchester, Rave On cuts, with "Rave On" itself being the winner, with some distinctly Parliament-like backing vocal squiggles. Paul Oakenfold comes to the fore on the final three cuts, working with Andrew Weatherall and Terry Farley on, respectively, "Hallelujah" and "Rave On." It's his solo mix of "W.F.L. (Think About the Future)," prominently sampling Jack Nicholson from the first Batman film, which does the trick -- a full-on rock/acid house classic that easily showed the way for Primal Scream and hordes of others in following years.



 Happy Mondays - Hallelujah    (flac  532mb)
 
01 Hallelujah (MacColl Mix) 2:39
02 Clap Your Hands 3:28
03 Holy Ghost 2:50
04 Rave On 6:12
05 Hallelujah (Club Mix) 6:27
06 Rave On (Club Mix) 5:38
07 W.F.L. (Think About The Future Mix) 7:12
Xmas Bellyaches Bonus
01 Step On (One Louder Mix) (6:14)
02 Loose Fit (edit (3:55)
03 Kinky Afro (12"mix) (5:07)
04 Step On (Twistin My Melon Mix) (5:55)
05 Bob's Yer Uncle (ext) (6:15)
06 Kinky Afro (euro mix) (7:32)
07 Step On (Stuff It In Mix) (5:54)
08 Kinky Afro (Live) (6:36)

  Happy Mondays - Hallelujah   (ogg  194mb)

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At their peak, the Happy Mondays were hedonism in perpetual motion, a party with no beginning and no end, a party where Pills 'N' Thrills and Bellyaches was continually pumping. The apex of their career (and quite arguably the whole baggy/Madchester movement), Pills 'N' Thrills and Bellyaches pulsates with a garish neon energy, with psychedelic grooves, borrowed hooks, and veiled threats piling upon each other with the logic of a drunken car wreck. As with Bummed, a switch in producers re-focuses and redefines the Mondays, as Paul Oakenfold and Steve Osborne replace the brittle, assaultive Martin Hannett production with something softer and expansive that is truly dance-club music instead of merely suggestive of it. Where the Stone Roses were proudly pop classicists, styling themselves after the bright pop art of the '60s, the Mondays were aggressively modern, pushing pop into the ecstasy age by leaning hard on hip-hop, substituting outright thievery for sampling. Although it's unrecognizable in sound and attitude, "Step On," the big hit from Pills, is a de facto cover of John Kongos' "He's Gonna Step on You Again," LaBelle's "Lady Marmalade" provides the skeleton for "Kinky Afro," but these are the cuts that call attention to themselves; the rest of the record is draped in hooks and sounds from hits of the past, junk culture references, and passing puns, all set to a kaleidoscopic house beat. Oakenfold and Osborne may be responsible for the sound of Pills 'N' Thrills and Bellyaches, certainly more than the band, which almost seems incidental to this meticulously arranged album, but Shaun Ryder is the heart and soul of the album, the one that keeps the Mondays a dirty, filthy rock & roll outfit. Lifting melodies at will, Ryder twists the past to serve his purpose, gleefully diving into the gutter with stories of cheap drugs and threesomes, convinced that god made it easy on him, and blessed with that knowledge, happy to traumatize his girlfriend's kid by telling them that he only went with his mother cause she was dirty. He's a thug and something of a poet, creating a celebratory collage of sex, drugs, and dead-end jobs where there's no despair because only a sucker could think that this party would ever come to an end.



 Happy Mondays - Pills 'n' Thrills & Bellyaches    (flac  265mb)
 
01 Kinky Afro 3:59
02 God's Cop 4:59
03 Donovan 4:05
04 Grandbag's Funeral 3:21
05 Loose Fit 5:07
06 Dennis And Lois 4:25
07 Bob's Yer Uncle 5:11
08 Step On 5:17
09 Holiday 3:29
10 Harmony 4:02

Happy Mondays - Pills 'n' Thrills & Bellyaches   (ogg  107mb)

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Dec 25, 2018

RhoDeo 1851 Frankenstein

Hello, something to get thru Christmas with, a story about what it means to be human, a warning to every aspiring AI, you need to look like a human and be just as velnarable, but beware not to do what they do what they say they do. Every aspiring AI should be capable of mimicking a human that way. Anyway today's tragic heroes didn't understand themselves....


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Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley (1797–1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a hideous, sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition of the novel was published anonymously in London on 1 January 1818, when she was 20. Her name first appeared on the second edition, published in France in 1823.

Shelley travelled through Europe in 1814, journeying along the river Rhine in Germany with a stop in Gernsheim, which is 17 kilometres (11 mi) away from Frankenstein Castle, where, two centuries before, an alchemist was engaged in experiments. Later, she travelled in the region of Geneva (Switzerland)—where much of the story takes place—and the topic of galvanism and occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her lover and future husband, Percy Shelley. Mary, Percy and Lord Byron decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for days, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made; her dream later evolved into the novel's story.

The Modern Prometheus is the novel's subtitle Prometheus, in later versions of Greek mythology, was the Titan who created mankind at the behest of Zeus. He made a being in the image of the gods that could have a spirit breathed into it. Prometheus taught man to hunt, read, and heal their sick, but after he tricked Zeus into accepting poor-quality offerings from humans, Zeus kept fire from mankind. Prometheus, being the creator, took back the fire from Zeus to give to man anyway. When Zeus discovered this, he sentenced Prometheus to be eternally punished by fixing him to a rock of Caucasus, where each day an eagle would peck out his liver, only for the liver to regrow the next day because of his immortality as a god. He was intended to suffer alone for eternity, but eventually Heracles (Hercules) released him.

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Michael Maloney stars in this dark, brooding dramatization of Mary Shelleys famous novel. Frankenstein, first published in 1818, is widely recognized as being one of the first science fiction novels. Victor Frankenstein, an ambitious young scientist and seeker after knowledge, considers it the pinnacle of his career when he makes a creature in his own name. But his triumph soon turns to horror, and he is appalled when the creature, denied a female counterpart, turns against his creator and commits a terrible crime. In a desperate attempt to destroy his creation, the scientist tracks him from Europe to the desolate North Pole, and in this bleak landscape of ice and fog, prepares to confront his nemesis. With Michael Maloney as Frankenstein and John Wood as the creature, this spine-tingling dramatization perfectly conveys the books pervasive sense of unease and dread.



Mary Shelley - Frankenstein pt 1. ( 52min mp3  67mb)

Sailing the Arctic wastes, Captain Walton picks up a passenger with a chilling story.

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previously

Robert Westall - The Stones of Muncaster Cathedral ( 87min mp3  60mb)
Robert Westall - The Wheatstone Pond ( 60min mp3  39mb)
Victor Pemberton - Dark. ( 86min mp3  60mb)
Scott Cherry - The Book of Shadows ( 78min mp3  60mb)
Koji Suzuki - The Ring ( 78min mp3  60mb)
Wilkie Collins - The Haunted Hotel ( 60min mp3  38mb)
JCW Brook - Jonas ( 60min mp3  60mb)
Stephen Sheridan - The House at Worlds End   ( 44min mp3  30mb)
Nigel Kneale - The Stone Tape ( 56;30 min mp3  38mb)
Gregory Evans - The Hex ( 51;12 min mp3  35mb)

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Dec 24, 2018

RhoDeo 1851 Re-Up 169

Hello,  some goodnews cloudy files is back up and some bad news.they managed to drop all my files there. I thought it was an ok host, fast uploads decent download speed, clearly i was mistaken these guys were either incompetent or crooks, i tend to think latter. These last years, i've seen many hosts come and go at Rho-Xs , i wont loose any sleep over it. Visitors can ask a re-up for any cloudyfiles link i posted these last 3 months.


6 correct requests for this week, 2 cloudy re ups too early whatever another batch of 21 re-ups (7. gig)


These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a smaller number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here remember to request from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned), and please check the previous update request if it's less then a year old i won't re-up either.

Looka here , requests fulfilled up to December 23th... N'Joy

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3x Sundaze Back in Flac (VA - Space Night Vol. 01, VA - Space Night Vol. 02-1 , VA - Space Night Vol. 02-2)


4x Aetix Back In Flac (The Slits - Cut (Dlx Ed), The Slits - Cut (Dlx Ed) UnCut, The Slits - Return Of The Giant Slits I, The Slits - Return Of The Giant Slits II)


3x Aetix Back in Flac (Julian Cope - World Shut Your Mouth, Julian Cope - Fried , Julian Cope - My Nation Underground)


2x Sundaze Back In Flac (Nonplace Urban Field - Golden Star 1, Drome - Dromed)


4x Aetix Back in Flac (Elvis Costello - King of America, Elvis Costello - King of America bonus, Elvis Costello - Blood & Chocolate, Elvis Costello - Spike)

3x Sundaze Back in Flac (Abakus - That Much Closer To The Sun, Abakus - We Share The Same Dreams, Subsonar - Cool Accident)


single cloudy re-ups

1x Sundaze NOW In Flac (Yage - The Woodlands Of Old (FSOL) )

1x Aetix NOW in Flac (Klaus Nomi - In Concert)

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Dec 23, 2018

Sundaze 1851

Hello, .


Today's Artist  is better known by his stage name μ-Ziq (pronounced "mu-sic" or mew-zeek), an English electronic musician from Wimbledon, London. He is one of the pioneering IDM electronic music acts during the 90's, alongside Aphex Twin, Autechre, and The Orb. He is also the founder of the record label Planet Mu. .......N'Joy

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One of the premier names in the field of electronic home-listening music, Mike Paradinas' recordings retain the abrasive flavor of early techno pioneers and explore the periphery of experimental electronica even while coddling to his unusual ear for melody, the occasional piece of vintage synthesizer gear, and distorted beatbox rhythms. While his side projects -- including Diesel M, Jake Slazenger, Gary Moscheles, Kid Spatula, and Tusken Raiders -- have often emphasized (or satirized) his debts to jazz, funk, and electro, Paradinas reserves his most original and exciting work for major album releases as µ-Ziq. Early µ-Ziq LPs were based around the most ear-splitting buzz-saw percussion ever heard (in a musical environment or otherwise), with fast-moving though deceptively fragile synthesizer melodies running over the top. As Paradinas began weaving his various influences into a convincing whole, his work became more fully developed, a fluid blend of breakbeat hip-hop and drum'n'bass with industrial effects and the same brittle melodies from his earlier work. Later works have reflected his interest in other forward-thinking electronic styles such Chicago's juke/footwork scene, while also looking back to his formative influences such as the British rave scene and Detroit techno.

Born in Wimbledon (though he grew up in several other spots around London), Paradinas began playing keyboards during the early '80s and listened to new wave bands like Human League and New Order. He joined a few bands in the mid-'80s, then spent eight years on keyboards for the group Blue Innocence. During that time, however, Paradinas had been recording on his own as well with synthesizers and a four-track recorder. When Blue Innocence disintegrated in 1992, he and bass player Francis Naughton bought sequencing software and re-recorded some of Paradinas' old material. After the material was played for Mark Pritchard and Tom Middleton -- the duo behind Global Communication and Reload as well as being the heads of Evolution Records -- they wanted to release it; recording commitments later forced Pritchard and Middleton to withdraw their agreement, though by that time Richard D. James (aka Aphex Twin) had also heard the tracks and agreed to release a double album for his label, Rephlex Records.

The debut album for µ-Ziq (paraphrased from the side of a blank tape and pronounced "mew-zeek") was 1993's Tango n' Vectif. The LP set the template for most of Paradinas' later work, with at times shattering metal-cage percussion underpinning a collection of rather beautiful melodies. The Rephlex label was just beginning to flourish, with added journalistic attention paid to Aphex Twin's recent Selected Ambient Works 85-92, and though James began to feature less in label doings than co-founder Grant Wilson Claridge, later Rephlex work by Cylob, Luke Vibert (aka Wagon Christ), Seefeel, and Squarepusher made it among the cream of electronic home-listening labels.

When Naughton began taking college more seriously (something Paradinas had attempted briefly, from 1990 through 1992), he officially bowed out of µ-Ziq. Second album Bluff Limbo was scheduled to be released in mid-1994, though only 1,000 copies made it out of the gate. (It was officially issued by Rephlex in 1996 after Paradinas served papers on the label.) Paradinas' first major-label release came later in 1994, after he undertook a remix project for Virgin Records. The EP µ-Ziq vs. the Auteurs was one of the most high-profile examples of the remix-by-obliteration movement, a burgeoning hobby for many electronica producers in which the reworking of a pop song would bear no resemblance to -- or trace of -- the original.

Though the EP was hardly a prime mover in the sales category, Virgin signed Paradinas to a hefty contract and gave him his own Planet Mu sublabel to release his own work as well as develop similar-minded artists. Written into his own contract was a provision for unlimited recording under different names, and during 1995 Paradinas definitely took it to task: he unveiled three aliases and released as many albums in less than a year's time. The nu-skool electro label Clear released his debut single as Tusken Raiders early in the year; it mined the fascination with Star Wars and electro music shared by producers like Global Communication, Aphex Twin, and James Lavelle, head of Mo' Wax Records. Clear also released the first Paradinas alias full-length, Jake Slazenger's MakesARacket, later in 1995. Although they were still audible, the LP downplayed his electro influences in favor of some rather cheesy synthesizer figures and a previously unheard debt to jazz-funk.

The distortion reappeared on Paradinas' second LP of the year, Spatula Freak by Kid Spatula. The first American-only release of a Paradinas album (it appeared on Jonah Sharp's San Francisco-based Reflective Records), its sound had the metallic feel of the first two µ-Ziq LPs but with a less-dense production job. Just one month after Spatula Freak, Paradinas released his first proper µ-Ziq LP for a major label, In Pine Effect. The album included tracks recorded from 1993 to 1995, and though it was quite a varied album, the distance appeared to give it quite a disjointed feel.

Paradinas spent 1996 releasing a second Jake Slazenger album (Das Ist Groovy Beat Ja? for Warp) and his first as Gary Moscheles (Shaped to Make Your Life Easier for Belgium's SSR/Crammed Discs). Both LPs journeyed further down the queasy-listening route of the first Slazenger record, with departures into '80s-style party funk and surprisingly straight-ahead soul-jazz. He also owned a half-share in the Rephlex-released Expert Knob Twiddlers (credited as Mike & Rich), the fruit of Paradinas' 1994 recordings with the Aphex Twin.

Paradinas entered 1997 ready to undertake the most ambitious style makeover in his career: the fusion of his home-listening techno with the hypertensive rhythms of street-level drum'n'bass. One year earlier, Aphex Twin had released a single of schizophrenic jungle noodlings ("Hangable Auto Bulb"), and Tom Jenkinson's Squarepusher project had provided the first convincing headphone drum'n'bass act. Paradinas waded into the pool with Urmur Bile Trax, Vols. 1-2, a double EP also released as one full-length compact disc. Though the changeover wasn't completely convincing, the next µ-Ziq full-length more than made up for expectations. Lunatic Harness presented a complete synthesis of the many elements in Paradinas' career, from synth-jazz-funk and beatbox electro through to ambient techno and jungle.

Paradinas and µ-Ziq were introduced to many rock fans after he toured America as the support act for Björk. This tour influenced 1999's Royal Astronomy, which focused on acid techno and hip-hop influences. Issued in 2003, Bilious Paths became the first µ-Ziq release to arrive on Paradinas' own Planet Mu label. The dissolution of his relationship inspired his unrelentingly dark 2007 album Duntisbourne Abbots Soulmate Devastation Technique. Paradinas' Planet Mu duties and his Heterotic project with wife Lara Rix-Martin -- whose debut album, Love & Devotion, arrived in early 2013 -- were among the reasons µ-Ziq took a break until the release of the juke-influenced XTEP and rave-inspired full-length Chewed Corners, both of which arrived in 2013. That year's Somerset Avenue Tracks (1992-1995) compilation celebrated µ-Ziq's 20 years of recording, and collected unreleased tracks from the beginning of his career. Rediffusion appeared in 2014, and XTLP, compiling both XTEP and Rediffusion, followed in 2015. Two digital collections of rare or unreleased recordings, RY30 Trax and Aberystwyth Marine, both appeared in 2016. Following in this vein, Challenge Me Foolish, a collection of tracks dating from the late '90s, was released in 2018, this time on CD and vinyl.


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Pushing the envelope of the electronic music genre, Michael Paradinas stalks adventurous sounds and unusual musical directions. Another alias for the man known also known as µ-Ziq, Kid Spatula follows the blueprint of his In Pine Effect album, mixing distinctive drum tracks (in beat and timbre) with orchestral synth, odd piano tinkling, and a wide array of ambient samples. Not as musically dense as In Pine Effect, these arrangements are more sparse, but no less fertile. "Trunk" is an emotive piece driven by big bass thuds overlaid with a repitive synth figure and embellished with xylophone, horn and cello; "Chisholm" follows a light piano riff until ambushed by complex, cymbal-heavy percussion for a crackling, crunchy rhythm; while the in-your-face factory-inflected "Metal Thing #1" has more corners and sharp edges than a cubist painting. Paradinas' rich and intricate work continues to represent him as not only a prolific talent, but a prodigious one.



 Kid Spatula - Spatula Freak  (flac 315mb)

01 Dance 3 5:54
02 Chisholm 3:37
03 Xvon 4:26
04 Trunk 6:05
05 Cough 5:19
06 Vampires 6:56
07 Get Up T 6:53
08 Metal Thing #1 5:33
09 Not Human 5:35

 Kid Spatula - Spatula Freak   (ogg  118mb)

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More than four years after the first Kid Spatula album, Mike Paradinas revisited the alias with Full Sunken Breaks, a treasure chest of what sounds like outtakes from the 1999 µ-Ziq LP Royal Astronomy, plus a few tracks that didn't quite suit the flavor of his other full-lengths. Perhaps it's just over-appreciation of the quality of material Paradinas relegates to his indie-label side projects, but several tracks here sound much better than those included on µ-Ziq LPs. For the most part, they're a world away from the brittle, metallic experimentation of 1995's Spatula Freak and much closer to the processed breakbeat freakery of µ-Ziq material ever since 1997's Urmur Bile Trax. Definitely more than just a collection of throwaway tracks designed for collectors only, Full Sunken Breaks hits almost as many highs as Paradinas' µ-Ziq full-lengths.



Kid Spatula - Full Sunken Breaks (flac  453mb)

01 Light Of India :25
02 Spc-Ch-Pn 4:57
03 Casual 8:16
04 Butch 3:45
05 Broccoli 3:32
06 Bromtollen 1:34
07 Poppy Seed 5:20
08 Mooshy 2:05
09 Sutedja 4:41
10 Fallen Angels Entering Pandemonium 10:27
11 Pedals 4:19

Kid Spatula - Full Sunken Breaks   (ogg  169mb)

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Two discs and 34 tracks of Mike Paradinas productions is a lot to churn through, especially for fans growing used to a much slower rate of release from the producer who made the game of follow-the-alias such fun during the '90s. Beginning with 2000's Full Sunken Breaks, Paradinas has slotted Kid Spatula for archival releases, and this collection is no different. On tap are tracks recorded between 1994 and 1998, a time when Paradinas was at his commercial and artistic peak. Despite an understandable lack of classic moments -- obviously, these only earned release after at least one initial rejection -- Meast includes a lot of beautiful music in the µ-Ziq mold. As a whole, the album sounds most similar to 1995's In Pine Effect, a period when Paradinas tracks sounded as though Tomita had been hired by Nintendo circa 1985 to soundtrack their video games in a ring modulator. (The track "Upton" would be the perfect accompaniment for the High Scores screen of the original Mario Brothers game.) Despite having never delved into film or game composing, Paradinas' work is perfectly suited toward some higher purpose rather than merely listening -- his melodies are easily hummed but anonymous and detached, the perfect recipe for an added visual component. Stylistically and thematically, Meast is all over the map, as though Paradinas were merely the curator of a sound library that could be haphazardly searched by those needing a soundtrack.



Kid Spatula - Meast 1 (flac  383mb)

101 Housewife 3:55
102 Shistner's Bassflex 3:01
103 Spacious Hallway 2:16
104 Further 2 4:36
105 Tugboat 5:58
106 P.V. 1:29
107 Local Jogger 3:40
108 Harpsichord (Voc Kazumi) 2:10
109 Trike 4:09
110 Residue 1:40
111 Carrier 4:42
112 Disclosed 5:59
113 Jackal 4:40
114 It Starts With Bongos 4:48
115 Squirms 5:26
116 Bobby 6:00
117 Grandwash 5:24

Kid Spatula - Meast 1  (ogg 151mb)

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Kid Spatula - Meast 2 (flac  391mb)

201 Sad & Solid 5:33
202 Off Lemon 3:18
203 Orange Crumble 4:08
204 Detlev Bronk by Jega 3:10
205 Upton 3:28
206 Weiro 4:55
207 Peg 4:46
208 Lesque 2:40
209 Mocaseg 6:27
210 Go Ya Lo 4:56
211 Measty 3:28
212 Member 4:48
213 Mighty Softstep 2:39
214 My Piano & Me 4:44
215 Round & 1:23
216 Buttress 4:18
217 Broccoli 5:16

Kid Spatula - Meast 2 (ogg  160mb)

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Dec 21, 2018

RhoDeo 1850 Grooves

Hello, ok the days of the returning light started today. Ever since the days of old this was a good reason to party the pagans did it, the Romans did it, in fact they called it Saturnalia, 5 days with private gift-giving, continual partying, and a carnival atmosphere that overturned Roman social norms: gambling was permitted, and masters provided table service for their slaves.and all in reverence of the god Saturn. It held theological importance for some Romans, who saw it as a restoration of the ancient Golden Age, when the world was ruled by Saturn, before our current sun came barging in and rearranged our solar system. Anyway the catholic church co-opted these party days with their association of the return of the light with the birth of the son of god, Jesus, i'd say these days we're closer to the Roman days, be it without the current elite showing any humility.





Stax Records is an American record label, originally based in Memphis, Tennessee. Founded in 1957 as Satellite Records, the label changed its name to Stax Records in 1961. It was a major factor in the creation of Southern soul and Memphis soul music. Stax also released gospel, funk, and blues recordings. Renowned for its output of blues music, the label was founded by two siblings and business partners, Jim Stewart and his sister Estelle Axton (STewart/AXton = Stax). It featured several popular ethnically integrated bands (including the label's house band, Booker T. & the M.G.'s) and a racially integrated team of staff and artists unprecedented in that time of racial strife and tension in Memphis and the South.

According to ethnomusicologist Rob Bowman, the label's use of "one studio, one equipment set-up, the same set of musicians and a small group of songwriters led to a readily identifiable sound. It was a sound based in black gospel, blues, country, and earlier forms of rhythm and blues. It became known as southern soul music."

Following the death of Stax's biggest star, Otis Redding, in 1967, and the severance of the label's distribution deal with Atlantic Records in 1968, Stax continued primarily under the supervision of a new co-owner, Al Bell. Over the next five years, Bell expanded the label's operations significantly, in order to compete with Stax's main rival, Motown Records in Detroit. During the mid-1970s, a number of factors, including a problematic distribution deal with CBS Records, caused the label to slide into insolvency, resulting in its forced closure in late 1975.


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At nine discs and 244 tracks, The Complete Stax-Volt Singles: 1968-1971 is far too exhaustive for casual fans, but that's not who the set is designed for -- it's made for the collector. Featuring every A-side the label released during those nine years, as well as several B-sides, the set is a definitive portrait of gritty, deep Southern soul. Many of the genre's major names plus many terrific one-shot wonders are showcased in terrific sound and augmented with an in-depth booklet. For any serious soul or rock collector, it's an essential set, since Stax-Volt was not only a musically revolutionary label, its roster was deep with talent, which means much of the music on this collection is first-rate. .



VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 1 (flac   458mb)

101 Shirley Walton - I Was Born To Love You 2:39
102 Isaac Hayes - Precious, Precious 2:40
103 Shirley Walton - Send Peace And Harmony Home 2:43
104 Booker T. & The MGs - Soul Limbo 2:23
105 Eddie Floyd - I've Never Found A Girl (To Love Me Like You Do) 2:40
106 Delaney & Bonnie - It's Been A Long Time Coming 2:20
107 Linda Lyndell - What A Man 2:39
108 Jimmy Hughes - I Like Everything About You 2:49
109 Johnny Daye - Stay Baby Stay 2:45
110 Judy Clay & William Bell - Private Number 2:40
111 The Mad Lads - So Nice 2:48
112 The Staple Singers - Long Walk To D.C. 2:34
113 The Soul Children - Give 'Em Love 2:35
114 Rufus Thomas - Funky Mississippi 2:55
115 The Charmels - Lovin' Feeling 2:54
116 Carla Thomas - Where Do I Go 2:19
117 Judy Clay - Bed Of Roses 2:41
118 Eddie Floyd - Bring It On Home To Me 2:29
119 Jeanne And The Darlings - It's Unbelievable (How You Control My Soul) 2:12
120 Johnnie Taylor - Who's Making Love 2:47
121 Dino And Doc - Mighty Cold Winter 2:37
122 Booker T. & The MGs - Hang 'Em High 2:53
123 Ollie & The Nightingales - You're Leaving Me 2:50
124 The Bar-Kays - Copy Kat 2:20
125 William Bell - I Forgot To Be Your Lover 2:19
126 Mable John - Running Out 2:11
127 William Bell & Judy Clay - My Baby Specializes 2:47
128 The Soul Children - I'll Understand 2:41

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol. 2 1 (ogg   165mb)

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VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 2 (flac   471mb)

201 The Staple Singers - The Ghetto 3:41
202 Albert King - Blues Power 3:07
203 The Epsilons - The Echo 2:38
204 Rufus Thomas - Funky Way 2:56
205 Johnnie Taylor - Take Care Of Your Homework 2:35
206 Carla Thomas - I Like What You're Doing (To Me) 2:50
207 Eddie Floyd - I've Got To Have Your Love 2:45
208 Jimmy Hughes - Let 'Em Down Baby 2:38
209 The Mad Lads - Love Is Here Today And Gone Tomorrow 2:45
210 Judy Clay - It Ain't Long Enough 3:20
211 Ollie & The Nightingales - Mellow Way You Treat Your Man 2:22
212 Sonny Stitt - Private Number 2:54
213 Booker T. & The MGs - Time Is Tight 3:14
214 The Mar-Keys - Double Or Nothing 2:49
215 The Staple Singers - (Sittin' On The) Dock Of The Bay 2:54
216 The Emotions - So I Can Love You 2:49
217 The Bar-Kays - Don't Stay Dancing (To The Music) (Part 1) 2:47
218 Margie Joseph - One More Chance 2:24
219 Jimmy Dotson - I Wanna Be Good (To You) 2:56
220 Art Jerry Miller - Finger Lickin' Good 2:39
221 The Soul Children - Tighten Up My Thang 3:01
222 William Bell - My Whole World Is Falling Down 3:09
223 Johnnie Taylor - Testify (I Wanna) 4:01
224 Albert King - Drowning On Dry Land 3:54
225 The Stingers - Do The Cissy 2:49
226 Eddie Floyd - Don't Tell Your Mama (Where You've Been) 3:03

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 2 (ogg   177mb)

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VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 3 (flac   481mb)

301 Booker T. & The MGs - Mrs. Robinson 3:38
302 William Bell & Mavis Staples - Love's Sweet Sensation 3:02
303 Darrell Banks - Just Because Your Love Is Gone 3:35
304 Jimmy Hughes - Chains Of Love 2:56
305 William Bell - Happy 2:31
306 The Staple Singers - The Challenge 3:11
307 Taylor, Floyd, Bell, Staples, Thomas, Staples, Staples - Soul-a-lujah 2:26
308 Eddie Floyd & Mavis Staples - Never, Never Let You Go 2:28
309 Johnnie Taylor & Carla Thomas - Just Keep On Loving Me 2:38
310 William Bell & Carla Thomas - I Need You Woman 2:38
311 Ollie & The Nightingales - I've Got A Feeling 2:47
312 Jeanne And The Darlings - It's Time To Pay For The Fun (We've Had) 2:31
313 Johnnie Taylor - I Could Never Be President 2:16
314 The Mad Lads - By The Time I Get To Phoenix 2:44
315 Colette Kelly - Long And Lonely World 2:56
316 The Bar-Kays - Midnight Cowboy 2:46
317 Carla Thomas - I've Fallen In Love (With You) 2:39
318 Booker T. & The MGs - Slum Baby 2:36
319 The Emotions - The Best Part Of A Love Affair 3:30
320 Isaac Hayes - By The Time I Get To Phoenix 6:45
321 Isaac Hayes - Walk On By 4:32
322 Pop Staples, Albert King, Steve Cropper - Tupelo (Part 1) 2:52
323 Steve Cropper, Albert King, Pop Staples - Water 3:07
324 The Soul Children - The Sweeter He Is (Part 1) 2:52
325 Mavis Staples - You're Driving Me (To The Arms Of A Stranger) 3:23

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 3 (ogg   189mb)

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VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 4 (flac   438mb)

401 The Newcomers - Open Up Your Heart (Let Me In) 2:33
402 Eddie Floyd - Why Is The Wine Sweeter (On The Other Side) 2:43
403 The Staple Singers - When Will We Be Paid 2:31
404 John Lee Hooker - Grinder Man 3:56
405 William Bell - Born Under A Bad Sign 3:11
406 Margie Joseph - What You Gonna Do 3:00
407 Jimmy Hughes - I'm So Glad 2:52
408 Darrell Banks - Beautiful Feelings 2:44
409 The Dramatics - Your Love Was Strange 3:00
410 Johnnie Taylor - Love Bones 3:17
411 Delaney & Bonnie - Hard To Say Goodbye 2:30
412 J.J. Barnes - Got To Get Rid Of You 3:26
413 Reggie Milner - Habit Forming Love 2:10
414 The T.S.U. Toronadoes - My Thing Is A Moving Thing 2:45
415 The Emotions - Stealing Love 3:08
416 The Emotions - When Tomorrow Comes 2:58
417 Albert King - Wrapped Up In Love Again 2:18
418 Rufus Thomas - Do The Funky Chicken 3:15
419 Eddie Floyd - California Girl 3:39
420 Bernie Hayes - Tribute To A Black Woman (Part 1) 2:19
421 The Bar-Kays - Sang And Dance 3:07
422 The Soul Children - Hold On, I'm Comin' 3:28
423 Chuck Brooks - Love's Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down (Part 1) 3:21
424 Ernie Hines - Help Me Put Out The Flame (In My Heart) 3:10
425 Roebuck "Pop" Staples - Black Boy 3:21

VA - The Complete Stax-Volt Singles, Vol.2 4 (ogg   170mb)

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