Aug 15, 2017

RhoDeo 1733 Roots

Hello,


Today's artist  was the second Argentine musician to make a significant impact upon modern jazz -- the first being Lalo Schifrin, in whose band he played. His story is that of an elongated zigzag odyssey between his homeland and North America. He started out playing to traditional Latin rhythms in his early years, turning his back on his heritage to explore the jazz avant-garde in the '60s, reverting to South American influences in the early '70s, playing pop and fusion in the late '70s, only to go back and forth again in the '80s. North American audiences first heard Barbieri when he was a wild bull, sporting a coarse, wailing John Coltrane/Pharoah Sanders-influenced tone. Yet by the mid-'70s, his approach and tone began to mellow somewhat. Still, regardless of the idiom in which he worked, the warm-blooded artist was always one of the most overtly emotional tenor sax soloists on record, occasionally driving the voltage ever higher with impulsive vocal cheerleading. His nickname, Gato, is Spanish for "cat".. ...N'Joy

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Gato Barbieri was the second Argentine musician to make a significant impact upon modern jazz -- the first being Lalo Schifrin, in whose band Barbieri played. His story is that of an elongated zigzag odyssey between his homeland and North America. He started out playing to traditional Latin rhythms in his early years, turning his back on his heritage to explore the jazz avant-garde in the '60s, reverting to South American influences in the early '70s, playing pop and fusion in the late '70s, only to go back and forth again in the '80s. North American audiences first heard Barbieri when he was a wild bull, sporting a coarse, wailing John Coltrane/Pharoah Sanders-influenced tone. Yet by the mid-'70s, his approach and tone began to mellow somewhat in accordance with ballads like "What a Diff'rence a Day Makes" (which he always knew as the vintage bolero "Cuando Vuelva a Tu Lado") and Carlos Santana's "Europa." Still, regardless of the idiom in which he worked, the warm-blooded Barbieri was always one of the most overtly emotional tenor sax soloists on record, occasionally driving the voltage ever higher with impulsive vocal cheerleading.

Though Barbieri's family included several musicians, he did not take up an instrument until the age of 12 when a hearing of Charlie Parker's "Now's the Time" encouraged him to study the clarinet. Upon moving to Buenos Aires in 1947, he continued private music lessons, picked up the alto sax, and by 1953 had become a prominent national musician through exposure in the Schifrin orchestra. Later in the '50s, Barbieri started leading his own groups, switching to tenor sax. After moving to Rome in 1962 with his Italian-born wife, he met Don Cherry in Paris the following year and, upon joining his group, became heavily absorbed in the jazz avant-garde. Barbieri also played with Mike Mantler's Jazz Composer's Orchestra in the late '60s; you can hear his fierce tone unleashed in the "Hotel Overture" of Carla Bley's epic work Escalator Over the Hill.

Yet after the turn of the next decade, Barbieri experienced a slow change of heart and began to reincorporate and introduce South American melodies, instruments, harmonies, textures, and rhythm patterns into his music. Albums such as the live El Pampero on Flying Dutchman and the four-part Chapter series on Impulse! -- the latter of which explored Brazilian and Afro-Cuban rhythms and textures, as well as Argentine -- brought Barbieri plenty of acclaim in the jazz world and gained him a following on American college campuses.

However, it was a commercial accident, his sensuous theme and score for the controversial film Last Tango in Paris in 1972, that made Barbieri an international star and a draw at festivals in Montreux, Newport, Bologna, and other locales. A contract with A&M in the U.S. led to a series of softer pop/jazz albums in the late '70s, including the brisk-selling Caliente! He returned to a more intense, rock-influenced, South American-grounded sound in 1981 with the live Gato...Para los Amigos under the aegis of producer Teo Macero, before doubling back to pop/jazz on Apasionado. Yet his profile in the U.S. was diminished later in the decade in the wake of the buttoned-down neo-bop movement.

He continued to record and perform well into the 1980s, including composing the scores to films such as Firepower (1979) and Strangers Kiss (1983). Beset by triple-bypass surgery and bereavement over the death of his wife, Michelle, who was his closest musical confidant, Barbieri was inactive through much of the 1990s. But he returned to action in 1997, playing with most of his impassioned intensity, if limited in ideas, at the Playboy Jazz Festival in Los Angeles and recording a somewhat bland album, Que Pasa, for Columbia. Che Corazon followed in 1999.

As the 21st century opened, Barbieri saw a steady stream of collections and reissues of his work appear. A new album, Shadow of the Cat, appeared from Peak Records in 2002.   Barbieri was the inspiration for the character Zoot in the fictional Muppet band Dr. Teeth and The Electric Mayhem. On April 2, 2016, Barbieri died of pneumonia in New York City at the age of 83.

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The second entry in Gato Barbieri's series of Impulse albums dealing with Latin America picks up where the first one left off, and in its way, follows its format closely yet not without some key differences. Based on the critical reviews of Chapter One: Latin America, he was emboldened to take some new chances on this, Chapter Two: Hasta Siempre (which translates to "As to Always.") The album was recorded between Rio de Janeiro and Los Angeles with the set's final cut recorded in Buenos Aires, Barbieri's homeland.

The set kicks off with parts one and three of "Econtrol," a raucous, festive jam that marks the album's only real concession to American music because of an electric bassline by Los Angeles sessionman Jim Hughart. The rest of the players are all Latins, most unheard of outside their native lands. Barbieri's blowing is, like Pharoah Sanders', over the top, unfettered, deeply emotive like the human voice in full-throated song. Totaled, the two parts of the suite cover six-and-a-half minutes -- part two was featured on an Impulse sampler called The Saxophone and is not present here. The accompaniment of Helio Delmiro's electric guitar with Paulinho Braga's drum kit, Mayuto Correa's conga work, and Daudeth de Azevedo's small, four-string guitar called the "cavaco" adds to the culture clash that comes flowing out of the center of the mix. Add to this Novelli's second electric bassline and it becomes an orgy of rhythm and carnival spirit: free, funky, and forceful. "Latino America" is a much more typical piece in that it employs folk instruments almost exclusively: Quena, Indian harp, bombo drums, small percussion alongside electric and classical guitars, and Barbieri's haunted saxophone lines playing full modal. "Maressea" is once more a sort of "fusion" tune where Latin instrumentation, carnival rhythms, Afro-Cuban salsa beats, and funky undertones all commingle, sweat, and groove under the saxophonist's intense, extremely busy tenor.

The only track not composed by Gato is the final one, "Juana Azureduy." Here, his narration (in Spanish) is supported by a host of drummers, guitars ranging from full-on electric and classical to charango, an electric funky bassline, and an army of small percussion as Indian harps and wood flutes swirl about the sound of his voice, which at times whispers like the wind, and at other times, shouts. His tenor, like Coltrane's performances on "India" or "Greensleeves," goes into the intricacies of minor modes to bring out the folk melodies he's evoking from the lyric line of the composition. At over 11 minutes, it is the longest cut here, and it's the strongest. It's a stunner and will leave any interested listener breathless by its finish. Interestingly, Chapter Two: Hasta Siempre wasn't greeted with the same laudatory critical acclaim as its predecessor was, but in some ways, it's a far stronger album, reflecting Barbieri's growing confidence in himself as a composer, arranger, and bandleader -- he already had his mettle as a soloist. This sounds great and is an essential entry in the canon of great Latin jazz.



Gato Barbieri - Chapter Two: Hasta Siempre (flac  260mb)

01 Encontros, Part One 2:16
02 Encontros, Part Three 4:15
03 Latino America 5:27
04 Marissea 7:40
05 Para Nosotros 8:01
06 Juana Azurduy 11:25

Gato Barbieri - Chapter Two: Hasta Siempre   (ogg  103mb)

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Chapter Three: Viva Emiliano Zapata is the third of the four excellent "chapters" in saxophonist and composer Gato Barbieri's four-part "Latin America" series for Impulse, and released in 1974 with the core of a band he would use for his live outing on Chapter Four: Alive in New York. Produced by Ed Michel, this is a large group that included bassist Ron Carter, drummer Grady Tate, percussionists Ray Mantilla, the ubiquitous -- and brilliant -- Portinho, Ray Armando, and Luis Mangual, guitarists George Davis and Paul Metzke, and a large horn section. The session was arranged and conducted by the legendary Chico O'Farrill. There are six tunes on the set, divided between four Barbieri originals, and two covers including the legendary "Milonga Triste," and "What a Difference a Day Makes." While the former became a staple of Barbieri's live sets, it's his own compositions that are of most interest here, such as the complex horn charts in "El Sublime," with its funky Latin backbeat and his gorgeous, impassioned, hard-edged blowing over the top. The groove is irresistible. The title track begins as a rhumba with a killer piano introducing the claves and other percussion before the popping brass underscore that unmistakable Afro-Cuban rhythm. O'Farrill colors his arrangement with lithe flutes finding spaces to be heard in the dense, building intensity of the horns and the drums and percussions playing counter rhythmic statements. What initially sounds like one statement being played continuously is gradually revealed to be a subtly shifting set of tones, rhythms, and even modalities. Barbieri blows against the entire mess initially, driving right into the enormous harmonious storm and eventually rising above it with enormous squeals and squawks, while never losing the lyric bent in the tune. It's a breathtaking finish to a stellar recording, and of the four chapters in the series, the one most accessible to most jazz fans.



Gato Barbieri - Chapter Three, Viva Emiliano Zapata   (flac  239mb)

01 Milonga Triste 5:00
02 Lluvia Azul 7:44
03 El Sublime 5:51
04 La Podrida 4:46
05 Cuando Vuelva A Tu Lado (What A Difference A Day Makes) 5:27
06 Viva Emiliano Zapata 6:06

Gato Barbieri - Chapter Three, Viva Emiliano Zapata   (ogg  98mb )

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This is what we call in Spanish "a descarga" (an unloading) from the first note. Gato is one of those few artists who can give us Coltrane's and other jazz standards with a Latino flare. The album's linear notes mention Gato's style as "baroque and bright", but make no mistake about it this is Latin Jazz at its best as only Gato Barbieri can provide. The songs are approached in a unique way -- they are free and energetic, going back and forth between fast, tight segments and loose, airy segments. Since there are congas and timbales on every cut, the drummer (Pretty Purdie) is free to play in short bursts with just the ride cymbal providing the main beat. The electric guitar playing is really cool, with quirky blues solos and some fantastic chord work. Amazing piano, as always, from Jorge Dalto. It is a brilliant, soulful, uptempo jazz statement that easily bridges the gap between BeBop and Latin Jazz. It evokes memories of Coltrane's 'A Love Supreme', and is also grittier than Barbieri's own 'Caliente'. Enjoy!!!



Gato Barbieri - Yesterdays   (flac  211mb)

01 Yesterdays 10:45
02 John Coltrane Blues 8:17
03 Marnie 7:07
04 Cariňoso 10:51

Gato Barbieri - Yesterdays (ogg  89mb)

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Charming and romantic fit the description of Gato Barbieri and the work he presents here, the album Ruby, Ruby. The production of the record, mastered and engineered handsomely by Herb Alpert, is very lush and beautiful to a lasting degree. Barbieri turns his first song, "Ruby," from an early-on haunting love ballad to an appealing and gripping all-out Latin jam session. This theme happens to find itself playing roles several times over throughout the record. The musicianship explored is captivating and adventurous, taking the listener on a passionate journey to whatever part of the soul he or she wishes to find or dares to pursue. A soaring sound at times, with Barbieri's splendid, racing saxophone melody lines. "Nostalgia" brings the delicate and eloquent guitar work of Lee Ritenour, who also takes part in the creation of "Sunride" and bits of "Ruby." As with most jazz records, percussion is responsible for playing a key role in the inception of the groove and depth of the material. Because of this album's Latin context, Barbieri does a wonderful job inspiring his friends in the rhythm section to come to life. Joe Clayton plays the textured conga on "Latin Reaction," and Lenny White leads a band of fellow passionate drummers, including Paulina da Costa, Steve Gadd, Steve Jordan, and Bernard Purdie. The entire atmosphere of the record changes smoothly in texture and tempo, drifting like a channeling stream from subdued and slow to rampant and passionately loud. Certainly, Barbieri intended it to be a delight of the first degree in the Latin scene, and one listen should win the hearts and minds of the listener. Conjuring up romance and scenes of a starry night in Latin America, this music is the soul of Latin music at its peak in the late '70s. A soothing and ethereal delight, even considering its only weakness: the lack of words and lyrics.



Gato Barbieri - Ruby, Ruby (flac  249mb)

01 Ruby 6:29
02 Nostalgia 5:25
03 Latin Reaction 4:58
04 Ngiculela - Es Una Historia - I Am Singing 5:45
05 Sunride 5:55
06 Adios 4:42
07 Blue Angel 5:46
08 Midnight Tango 4:27

Gato Barbieri - Ruby, Ruby (ogg  104mb)

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1 comment:

Guitarradeplastico your favorite musician said...

ole for Gato Barbieri - Ruby, Ruby and the others for flac