May 31, 2017

RhoDeo 1722 Aetix

Hello,



Today's artists were started by Mike Score and his brother Ali in 1979 in Liverpool. Mike, who was previously a hairdresser, played keyboards, guitar, and vocals, Ali played drums and their friend fellow hairdresser Frank Maudsley played bass. The band took their name from a line in the song "Toiler on the Sea" by The Stranglers, which appears on their album Black and White.They added guitarist Paul Reynolds and began writing songs, playing clubs and trying to land a record contract. The group released its debut EP on Bill Nelson's Cocteau Records early in 1981, and while the record failed to chart, its lead track, "Telecommunication," became an underground hit in Euro-disco and new wave clubs.....N'Joy

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A Flock of Seagulls was started by Mike Score in 1980 in Liverpool. The band's name was taken from The Stranglers song "Toiler on the Sea", according to Mike Score. The inaugural line-up of the band featured Mike, who was previously a hairdresser, on keyboards and lead vocals, Ali Score on drums, and Frank Maudsley on bass. The band added Willie Woo on guitar; and then brought in Mark Edmondson to replace Ali on drums when the Score brothers had a falling out. Not long afterwards, Edmondson departed to make way for a returning Ali; and shortly thereafter Woo departed the band and was replaced by teenager Paul Reynolds (of the band Cindysbeentrippin), who had been a close friend of Edmondson, at the behest of Maudsley; thus creating the band's classic line-up. After practising above Score's hair salon, the band started playing clubs and eventually got a recording contract.

Eventually, under the management of Tommy Crossan and Mick Rossi (Checkmount Limited), they began to release singles through Jive Records. The group released their debut single 'Talking' (produced by Nelson), on Bill Nelson's Cocteau label. They were then signed to major label Jive, distributed through CBS records, where they released their second single 'Telecommunication'. The single was also produced by Nelson and became a club hit. Their third release was the EP 'Modern Love is Automatic'. Originally released as a 4 track EP on both 7" and 12", the 12" edition was soon reissued adding 'Telecommunication'. This 5 track EP was also their first release in the U.S. In 1982, the group's fourth single 'I Ran (So Far Away)', produced by Mike Howlett, the former bass player of the band Gong, became a worldwide hit, reaching number 1 in Australia and the Top 10 in both the US and New Zealand. Their debut album and another single, 'Space Age Love Song', were both also successful. In late 1982, the band finally found major success in their home country with 'Wishing (If I Had a Photograph of You)', the first single from their next album Listen, which reached the Top 10. Later, the band was praised for having broken the ground for other musical acts during the advent of the video music area, but as it turned out, 1982 was the peak year of their commercial and critical success.

Three more singles were released from Listen in 1983, including a re-recorded version of their debut single '(It's Not Me) Talking', but they were only minor successes in the UK and abroad. Faced with disappointment, the group changed direction from their Science Fiction themes and produced a more conceptual emotion based third album in 1984 called The Story of a Young Heart, with 'The More You Live, the More You Love' as the lead single. Despite heavy rotation on MTV and other music video shows at that time, the single was only moderately successful, but the album's other two singles – 'Never Again (The Dancer)' and 'Remember David' (released only in a few European counties) – did not make any headway. Faced with sliding sales and a loss of direction, the band continued to consider their options whilst touring. During this period, Paul Reynolds left the band, and was replaced by Gary Steadman; with the band bringing in keyboardist Chris Chryssaphis at the same time to augment their sound. Both would stay in the band for the sessions during which their next album, Dream Come True (released in 1985 in the UK and 1986 in the USA), would be recorded, but would depart thereafter.

Brothers Mike and Ali Score decided that they wanted to base the band out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. With past success in the USA, both brothers thought leaving the UK and a new life in America was a perfect solution. With the popularity of the first two albums and the name "A Flock of Seagulls" still having some equity, they had 4 straight sell-out shows in Philadelphia. Mike, Ali and Maudsley all applied for and were conditionally awarded green cards based on celebrity status under the O-1 work visa. The conditional approval was granted to all three, who settled in Philadelphia. However, shortly after moving to the states, and whilst recording Dream Come True, Maudsley became disillusioned with living in a strange city; he had no family in the USA. Missing the UK, he ultimately returned to England following the completion of the album. Mike and Ali stayed in Philadelphia and satisfied the terms of the visa. With Frank in Britain and the brothers in the USA the band appeared to be splitting into two camps; whereas in fact, it was actually Frank Maudsley who kept the band communicating. Ultimately, the brothers had a falling out which resulted in the band dissolving in 1986; shortly after the US release of Dream Come True.

Mike Score initially reformed the band in 1988 in Philadelphia under the name A Flock of Seagulls with a line-up composed of himself along with numerous local musicians; consisting of guitarists Ed Berner and Dave Maerz, bass guitarist, Mike Radcliffe, keyboardist Mike Railton, and drummers' Kaya Pryor and Jonte Wilkins. This line-up expanded the following year to include drummer Mike Marquart; but was then reduced to a five-piece band consisting of Score, Berner, Pryor, Radcliffe, and Railton; and it was this line-up which released the single "Magic" that same year.

In 1994 the band's line-up changed again; this time to a formation consisting of Score, Berner, and new recruits A.J. Mazzetti (drums) and Dean Pichette (bass guitar). This line-up recorded the band's most recent album, The Light at the End of the World, in 1996, but the album failed to chart.

In 1998 Berner, Mazzetti, and Pichette departed the band and were replaced by Joe Rodriguez, Darryl Sons, and Rob Wright respectively. In 1999 the band re-recorded the Madonna song "This Used to Be My Playground" for the 2000 Madonna tribute album The World's Greatest 80s Tribute to Madonna. In November 2003 the original line-up of Mike and Ali Score, Paul Reynolds and Frank Maudsley reunited for a one-off performance on the VH1 series Bands Reunited. In September 2004 they reformed again and did a brief tour in the United States. Though the tour continued to be advertised as the "original lineup", later shows no longer included the reunited band but was Mike Score's continuation of the original band; which by this point consisted of Score, Rodriguez, and new recruits Michael Brahm (drums), and Pando (bass guitar). This line-up of the band has gone unchanged since that time.

On 4 February 2013 Score indicated via his YouTube account that he was pursuing his solo career. He released the singles "All I Wanna Do" in February 2013, and "Somebody Like You" in January 2014. On 1 March 2014, Score released a solo album, Zeebratta.

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The Liverpool quintet A Flock of Seagulls first gained attention in the dance clubs with "Telecommunication," included on this debut release. The band benefited from heavy play on MTV and quickly became known for their outrageous fashion and lead singer Mike Score's waterfall-like haircut. However, their self-titled debut is an enjoyable romp that was set apart from other synth-heavy acts of the time by Paul Reynolds' unique guitar style. The kinetic "I Ran (So Far Away)" became a video staple and a Top Ten radio hit. "A Space Age Love Song," with its synthesizer washes and echo-laden guitar, also managed to score at radio. The rest of the album consists of hyperactive melodies, synthesizer noodlings, and electronic drumming. The lyrics are forgettable. In fact, they rarely expand on the song titles, but its all great fun and a wonderful collection of new wave ear candy.



A Flock Of Seagulls - Flock Of Seagulls (flac  371mb)

01 Modern Love Is Automatic 3:49
02 Messages 2:52
03 I Ran 5:06
04 Space Age Love Song 3:47
05 You Can Run 4:26
06 Telecommunication 2:32
07 Standing In The Doorway 4:41
08 Don't Ask Me 2:46
09 D.N.A. 2:31
10 Tokyo 2:55
11 Man Made 5:41
Bonus
12 Pick Me Up 3:07
13 Windows 3:31
14 Tanglimara 4:31
15 Intro 3:24

A Flock Of Seagulls - Flock Of Seagulls   (ogg  133mb)

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Following their gold-selling Top 10 debut, A Flock of Seagulls returned in 1983 with Listen. Mike Howlett again handled the production chores, but the band errantly chose to pursue even more reliance on electronics, which gives Listen a bit of a sterile feel. Nonetheless, there are still several tracks here that are as strong as their debut, even if, as a whole, the album isn't as consistent. Listen spawned only one hit, but it's a gem; the multi-layered, hypnotic "Wishing (If I Had a Photograph of You)." Other standouts include the eerie, moody "Nightmares" with its sparse guitar and synthesizer squawks, and a surprisingly effective ballad "Transfer Affection." Ultimately, the band loses the plot on the second half, when they seem to forget melodies and focus on hardware; although the Bill Nelson-produced "(It's Not Me) Talking" is a bracing, breakneck tempo return to their interest in aliens.



A Flock Of Seagulls - Listen (flac 460mb)

01 Wishing (If I Had A Photograph Of You) 5:34
02 Nightmares 4:39
03 Transfer Affection 5:23
04 What Am I Supposed To Do 4:13
05 Electrics 3:37
06 The Traveller 3:27
07 2:30 1:00
08 Over The Border 5:04
09 The Fall 4:30
10 (It's Not Me) Talking 5:01
Bonus
11 Wishing (If I Had A Photograph Of You) (Extended Version) 9:13
12 Committed 5:38
13 Nightmares (12" Version) 5:05
14 Quicksand 4:44
15 Tanglimara 4:31

A Flock Of Seagulls - Listen   (ogg  171mb)

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Faced with declining sales and a sound that was already becoming considered passé, A Flock of Seagulls retooled a bit for their third album, The Story of a Young Heart. Steve Lovell stepped into the producer's role and the band eased up on its heavily synthesized approach for more of a Europop feel, to no avail. The less cluttered, more polished sound of album is undermined by the limited vocal ability of singer Mike Score. His monotone delivery fails to imbue the songs with any warmth. "The More You Live, the More You Love" is as good as anything they've done and gave the band one final chart hit. Otherwise, the best stuff is near the end and sounds most reminiscent of their debut. "Over My Head" and "Heart of Steel" bound along but sound thin. However, they almost recapture their hyperkinetic glory with "Remember David." The Story of a Young Heart is the sound of a band slowly losing momentum.



 A Flock Of Seagulls - The Story Of A Young Heart (flac 501mb)

01 The Story Of A Young Heart 6:06
02 Never Again (The Dancer) 5:05
03 The More You Live, The More You Love 4:10
04 European (I Wish I Was) 4:26
05 Remember David 4:06
06 Over My Head 3:55
07 Heart Of Steel 5:45
08 The End 3:34
09 Suicide Day 5:23
Bonus
10 The More You Live, The More You Love 4:13
11 The More You Live, The More You Love (Full Moon Mix) 6:16
12 Lost Control (Totally) 4:12
13 Never Again (The Dancer) (7" Version) 3:45
14 Never Again (The Dancer) (12" Dance Mix) 5:17
15 Living In Heaven 5:32
16 Remember David (7" Version) 4:06

A Flock Of Seagulls - The Story Of A Young Heart   (ogg  183mb)

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Breathing new life into bands who disappeared before their time, once again placing this band as a trail blazer on the musical frontier. It is by no accident that the largest percentage of fans are coming from the gothic and industrial underground. This scene has often been at the cutting edge of introspective art in a world that is dark and alienating, not unlike some of the Seagulls lyrics. An incredible collection of new versions of these career spanning songs, energetically and progressively mixed by such Gothic Industrial stalwarts such as Pigface, KMFDM, Mission UK, Spahn Ranch, and Die Krupps. Futuristic and intense music you might hear in a Blade Runner world! These are intense (Gothic) Rock epics, which I differentiate from 'Industrial' because of the melodic and textural electric guitar playing, utilizing also a percussive sampled approach on "Space Age Love Song (KMFDM mix)". Whether one is an old fan or new, this remix project is recommended for its timeliness and great dance beats. It remains and additional testament for a band who reflects its namesake, ever striving for a higher ground and flying above the others, undaunted by obstacles and changing climates.



A Flock Of Seagulls - Greatest Hits Remixed (flac  459mb)
 
01 I Ran (Die Krupps Remix) 3:46
02 Space Age Love Song (KMFDM Remix) 4:50
03 The More You Live (Mission UK Remix) 4:51
04 Telecommunication (JLAB Remix) 3:04
05 Wishing (Intra-Venus Remix) 5:00
06 Messages (Interface Remix) 4:52
07 The Traveller (Julian Beeston Remix) 5:00
08 Burning Up (Pigface Remix) 4:05
09 Wishing (LCD Remix) 4:42
10 Nightmares (Interfaith Psi-Fix Remix) 4:59
11 Rainfall (Spahn Ranch Remix) 4:32
12 I Ran (Pistel Remix) 5:00
13 Space Age Love Song (Astralasia Remix) 4:56

A Flock Of Seagulls - Greatest Hits Remixed   (ogg  147mb)

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May 30, 2017

RhoDeo 1722 Roots

Hello,


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Lalo Schifrin (born June 21, 1932) is an Argentine pianist, composer, arranger and conductor. He is bestknown for his film and TV scores, such as the "Themefrom Mission: Impossible ". He has received four Grammy Awards and six Oscar nominations. Schifrin, associated with the jazz music genre, is also noted for work withClint Eastwood in the late 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, par-ticularly the Dirty Harry films.

Schifrin was born in Buenos Aires to Jewish parents. His father, Luis Schifrin, led the second violin section of the orchestra at the TeatroColón for three decades. At the age of six, Schifrin began a six-year course of study on piano with Enrique Barenboim, the father of the pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim. At age 16, Schifrin began studying piano with the Greek-Russian expatriate Andreas Karalis, former head of the Kiev Conservatory, and harmony with Argentine composer Juan Carlos Paz. During this time, Schifrin also became interested in jazz. Although Schifrin studied sociology and law at the University of Buenos Aires, it was music that captured his attention.

At age 20, he successfully applied for a scholarship to the Paris Conservatoire. At night he played jazz in the Paris clubs. In 1955, Schifrin played piano with Argentinian bandoneon giant Ástor Piazzolla, and represented his country at the International Jazz Festival in Paris.

After returning home to Argentina, Schifrin formed a jazzorchestra, a16-piece band that became part of a pop-ular weekly variety show on Buenos Aires TV. Schifrin also began accepting other film, television and radio as-signments. In 1956, Schifrin met Dizzy Gillespie and offered to write an extended work for Gillespie’s big band.Schifrin completed the work, Gillespiana, in 1958 (it was recorded in 1960).

Later that year Schifrin began working as an arranger for Xavier Cugat's popular Latin dance orchestra.While in New York in 1960, Schifrin again met Gillespie, who had by this time disbanded his big band for financial reasons. Gillespie invited Schifrin to fill the vacant piano chair in his quintet. Schifrin immediately accepted and moved to New York City. Schifrin wrote a secondextended composition for Gillespie, The New Continent, which was recorded in 1962. In 1963, MGM, which hadSchifrin under contract, offered the composer his first Hollywood film assignment with the African adventure Rhino!
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Schifrin moved to Hollywood late that year. He also radically re-arranged the theme for the popularNBC-TV series  The Man from U.N.C.L.E., altering original composer Jerry Goldsmith's theme to a jazzy melody emphasizing flutes and exotic percussion, which wound up winning the Emmy award for Best TV Theme in1965.One of Schifrin’s most recognizable and enduring com-positions is the theme music for the long-running TV se-ries Mission: Impossible. It is a distinctive tune written inthe uncommon 5/4 time signature. Similarly, Schifrin’s theme for the hugely successful  Mannix private eye TVshow was composed a year later in a 3/4 waltz time; Schifrin composed several other jazzy and bluesy num-bers over the years as additional incidental music for the show. Schifrin’s“Tar Sequence” from his Cool Hand Luke score(also written in 5/4) was the longtime theme for the Eyewitness News broadcasts on NewYork station WABC-TV and other ABC affliates, as well as National Nine News in Australia. CBS Television used part of the the me of his St. Ives soundtrack for its golf broadcasts in the1970s and early 1980s.Schifrin’s score for Coogan’s Bluff in 1968 was the beginning of a long association with Clint Eastwood and di-rector Don Siegel. Schifrin’s strong jazz blues riffs were evident in
 Dirty Harry Schifrin’s working score for 1973’s  The Exorcist was re-jected by the film’s director, William Friedkin. Schifrin had written six minutes of difficult and heavy music for the initial film trailer, but audiences were reportedly frightened by the combination of sights and sounds.Warner Bros. ecutives told Friedkin to instruct Schifr in to tone it down with softer music, but Friedkin did not relay the message. Schifrin’s final score was thrown out in to the parking lot. Schifrin reported in an interview that working with Friedkin was one of the most unpleasant ex-periences in his life.

Over the next decade, Schifrin would score films like The Cincinnati Kid, Bullitt, Cool Hand Luke, Dirty Harry, and Enter the Dragon. As a jazzer, he wrote the well-received "Jazz Mass" suite in 1965, and delved into stylish jazz-funk with 1975's CTI album Black Widow. Schifrin continued his film work all the way through the '90s; during that decade, he recorded a series of orchestral jazz albums called Jazz Meets the Symphony, and became the principal arranger for the Three Tenors, which complemented his now-dominant interest in composing classical music.

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After scoring an unexpected high-profile success with the disco/jazz fusion of Black Widow, Lalo Schifrin quickly recorded a follow-up album in a similar vein. 1977's Towering Toccata replicates the elegant yet dance-friendly style of Black Widow to the tee, right down to the unconventional cover choices. The best of these is the title track, an insistently rhythmic piece that transforms Bach's gothic-organ extravaganza "Toccata and Prelude in F Minor" into a mid-tempo disco workout that backs up Schifrin's jazzy explorations on the electric piano and synthesizer with scratching rhythm guitar and a pronounced dance beat. Other notable moments on this album include "Most Wanted Theme," which is transformed from action-show theme music into a symphonic funk workout, and "Rollercoaster," a funky vamp from the Schifrin soundtrack of the same name that is ideally suited for Towering Toccata's disco/jazz mindset. There is even another monster-movie theme cover in the vein of the previous album's "Jaws"; this time, it's a disco-friendly treatment of John Barry's "Theme From King Kong" that layers atmospheric horn and flute lines over a bottom-heavy rhythm section fueled by wah-wah guitar and synth bass. However, other tracks on Towering Toccata fail to be as distinctive or adventurous as these highlights. For instance, the original tunes ("Macumba," "Midnight Woman") fit the album's mood but are lacking strong hooks and memorable twists in their arrangements that distinguished the originals on Black Widow. This problem of inconsistent material, combined with the fact that the album is basically a stylistic carbon copy of its predecessor, means that it isn't the ideal follow-up to Black Widow that Schifrin fans might have hoped for. That said, the album has enough strong tunes and enough of a consistent sound to please hardcore Lalo Schifrin fans and anyone who loved Black Widow.



Lalo Schifrin - Towering Toccata (flac  181mb)

01 Towering Toccata 5:04
02 Frances' Theme - From The Motion Picture " The Day Of The Animals " 4:19
03 Macumba 6:13
04 Eagles In Love 2:51
05 Theme From King Kong 4:13
06 Most Wanted Theme 2:45
07 Midnight Woman 6:07
08 Roller Coaster 4:46

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After a brief stint at contemporary jazz label CTI, Lalo Schifrin signed to Tabu Records, where the composer made two records that blurred the line between fusion and disco. Gypsies, his first record for Tabu, uses that polyester swagger as a foundation but Schifrin decided to indulge his ambitions on the 1978 album, choosing to create an instrumental conceptual record that somewhat traces his Argentine roots but also feels like it exists at a crossroads where fusion, disco, and prog rock all meet. In other words, Gypsies feels very, very 1978, pulsating to a glittery four-four beat and colored with clavinets and squealing analog synthesizers. As intended, there is a feeling of a journey here: it's all widescreen vistas and spectacles, where even slower songs like "Prophecy of Love" feel designed for a silver screen. Such is the curse of the film composer but that sense of scale is the most admirable thing about Gypsies, a record that sometimes gets weighed down by its period accouterments, particularly those omnipresent squalling synths. Then again, that period charm is a good reason to listen to Gypsies: it is an album, after all, that could've only been made in the year of 1978. [Edsel's 2014 expansion of Gypsies contains three bonus tracks, all radio versions of songs on the album: "Moonlight Gypsies," "Fortune Tellers," and "Prophecy of Love."]



Lalo Schifrin - Gypsies   (flac  284mb)

01 Cast A Spell 5:40
02 King Of Hearts 5:14
03 Moonlight Gypsies 4:57
04 Fortune Tellers 4:40
05 Gauchos 5:34
06 Pampas 5:32
07 Prophecy Of Love 3:39
08 Ring Around The Moon 5:23
Bonus
09 Moonlight Gypsies (Radio Version) 3:11
10 Fortune Tellers (Radio Version) 3:05
11 Prophecy Of Love (Radio Version) 3:05

 Lalo Schifrin - Gypsies   (ogg   126mb)

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In 1983, Viva Records released the soundtrack to Sudden Impact, which also contained music from two other scores written by Lalo Schifrin for Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry series of detective thrillers, Magnum Force and The Enforcer. (There were five Dirty Harry films in all, and Schifrin wrote the music for four of them.) The Dirty Harry Anthology, issued on Schifrin's own label, presents his newly recorded versions of music from the first film, Dirty Harry (1971), as well as Magnum Force (1973), and Sudden Impact. The earlier scores contain typical elements from their time, including the plucked bass and wah wah guitar sounds typical of Shaft and other scores of the time. As action movies, of course, the soundtracks require a fair amount of music to support and complement tense action sequences, and Schifrin delivers, mixing jazz and rock elements with other styles. From the start, with Eastwood's famous "Do you feel lucky?" speech from the first movie, the series is effectively evoked, and the music holds up, maybe even better than the frankly politically incorrect films do.



Lalo Schifrin - Dirty Harry Anthology (flac  230mb)

Dirty Harry
01 Dirty Harry's Creed 3:27
02 Scorpio's Theme 3:08
03 Sudden Impact 2:51
04 Road To San Paulo 1:07
05 Hot Shot Cop 1:25
06 Magnum Force Theme 2:10
07 Stake-Out 2:33
Magnum Force
08 Another Victim 1:19
09 Robbery Suspect 2:15
10 Floodlights 1:35
11 The Cop 2:00
12 Unicorn's Head 2:39
Sudden Impact
13 Good-Bye Cop 1:27
14 The Bait 0:48
15 San Francisco After Dark 3:06
16 The Crooks 1:37
17 The Mayor 2:24
18 Palancio 4:07
19 Ray Of Light 2:05

Lalo Schifrin - Dirty Harry Anthology (ogg  87mb)

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In 1966, when Dizzy Gillespie arranger and spy soundtracker Lalo Schifrin finished recording a Baroque album, he decided to make it a tribute to the Marquis de Sade -- in league with a play then circulating in the West End and on Broadway. Making the Third Stream seem like Percy Faith in comparison, the LP practically disappeared upon release on Verve, but enjoyed a long shelf life among idiosyncratic jazz fans. Thirty-five years on, Return of the Marquis de Sade is the sequel, with a host of songs comprising jazz rhythms and soloing, though a predominant use of Baroque instrumentation. Several of the song titles, including "Relaxin' at Charenton" and "A Night in Venezia," pun on famous jazz standards, while the performances crackle with imagination and energy. The final three tracks were recorded in tandem with Ray Brown, Grady Tate, Tom Scott, Brian Bromberg, and the London Philharmonic.



Lalo Schifrin - Return Of The Marquis De Sade (flac  305mb)

01 Relaxin' At Charenton 5:31
02 A Lover's Mask 5:54
03 Come My Way 5:03
04 A Night In Venezia 7:07
05 The Marquis Is Back 5:57
06 Justine 5:41
07 Bach To The Blues 5:25
08 Eine Kleine Jazz Music 3:24
09 Madrigal 4:05

Lalo Schifrin - Return Of The Marquis De Sade (ogg  115mb)

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May 29, 2017

RhoDeo 1722 Clockwork 1

Hello, my prediction for the 100th Giro didn't pan out because Pinot clearly had taken too much out of himself for his win the day before and he dropped of the podium. On it stood Tom Dumoulin a deserved winner, flanked by two former winners, Quintana and Nibali these two topclass riders gave it all but it wasn't enough, what a great win for Tom..

Over in Monaco Vettel was clearly the best, Ferrari won for the first time in 16 years, Raikonen second and he showed awareness being 2nd best, tough after a pole position. No luck for Verstappen as he tried to undercut Bottas, his tirechange didn't go smooth he lost almost a second to Bottas who reacted immediately and maneged to just stay in front of Verstappen. As these two dogs fought over the 3rd place bone. Ricciardo had free space in front and drove like mad and scored the overcut and he came in third. But Monaco should invest in a better trophee that nest of sociopaths is in danger of becoming boring.



A Clockwork Orange suffers from an artificially inflated degree of mythology. Adapted from the 1962 Anthony Burgess novel about anarchic, slang-spouting yobs ("droogs") in a grey, divided, dystopian future, it was shocking then and still is today, particularly the rape and sadistic "ultraviolence" in the first half. But such unpleasant excesses make important points about the dangers of a two-tier totalitarian society, and the scenes in which ringleader Alex is relentlessly brainwashed into submission by the state send an ambiguous message. It is, however, prescient, visceral, compelling and hard to forget. N'joy.

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A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian novel by Anthony Burgess published in 1962. Set in a near future English society featuring a subculture of extreme youth violence, the teenage protagonist, Alex, narrates his violent exploits and his experiences with state authorities intent on reforming him. The book is partially written in a Russian-influenced argot called "Nadsat". According to Burgess it was a jeu d'esprit written in just three weeks. In 2005, A Clockwork Orange was included on Time magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels written since 1923, and it was named by Modern Library and its readers as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.

Sadistic young gang leader Alex leads a carefree life indulging his love of rape, violence and classical music. When he is finally arrested, he is subjected to a sinister form of aversion therapy that brainwashes him into being physically unable to use violence. However, on his release, he finds friends and family have turned on him, while others seek to exploit him to further their political ends.

The book, narrated by Alex, contains many words in a slang argot which Burgess invented for the book, called Nadsat. It is a mix of modified Slavic words, rhyming slang, derived Russian (like baboochka), and words invented by Burgess himself. For instance, these terms have the following meanings in Nadsat: droog = friend; korova = cow; gulliver ("golova") = head; malchick or malchickiwick = boy; soomka = sack or bag; Bog = God; khorosho ("horroshow") = good; prestoopnick = criminal; rooka ("rooker") = hand; cal = crap; veck ("chelloveck") = man or guy; litso = face; malenky = little; and so on.

This is a BBC radio dramatization of A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess's 1963 novel was published with a glossary of the dystopian language used by Alex, the brutal teenage narrator. The quality of Tom Hollander's performance, however, renders such help unnecessary. Hollander's vocal suggestiveness, grasp of tone, and overall emotional resonance with the novel give listeners amazing clarity. You listen to Alex's adventures, amazed at the clarity Hollander gives to such a verbally ambitious work. This recording also includes the last chapter of the novel (not published in the first American edition), it dates from somewhere around 1997. Directed by Alison Hindell, it stars Tom Hollander  as the murderous 'droog,' Alex.

In 3 circa 30min parts.... N'Joy


A Clockwork Orange part 1 (mp3  72mb)

01 What's It Going To Be Then, Eh- 4:12
02 Ultraviolence 5:17
03 Destruction's Our Ode To Joy 7:02
04 Real Horrorshow 5:40
05 The Art of Hypocrisy 9:27

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May 28, 2017

Sundaze 1722

Hello, as mentioned yesterday the Giro is up for an exiting 30k timetrail finish,the mountainriders could really shake of Tom Dumoulin just a 15 sec loss saw him drop from 2nd to 4th but he's still just 53 sec behind race leader Quintana who might well have dropped back to 4th after the last race, i tip Pinot 2nd and Nibali 3rd. Go Tom.

Over at Monaco, mr Hamilton had an off day during qualifying he's starting 12th oh dear, In front tomorrow the Ferraris with Bottas a close 3rd for Verstappen who qualified well in front of his teammate Ricciardo who leads the rest of the field, tactics will be very important tomorrow...


Today's Artist is an American composer, best known for his work scoring films for director David Lynch, notably Blue Velvet, the Twin Peaks saga (1990–1992, 2017), The Straight Story and Mulholland Drive.He received the 1990 Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for his "Twin Peaks Theme", and has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the World Soundtrack Awards and the Henry Mancini Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.. ....N'Joy

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Badalamenti was born in Brooklyn, New York to an Italian family; his father, who was of Sicilian descent, was a fish market owner. He began taking piano lessons at age eight. By the time Badalamenti was a teenager, his aptitude at the piano earned him a summer job accompanying singers at resorts in the Catskill Mountains. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Eastman School of Music and then earned Master of Arts degrees in composition, French horn, and piano from the Manhattan School of Music in 1960.
Film scoring

Badalamenti scored films such as Gordon's War, and Law and Disorder, but his big break came when he was brought in to be Isabella Rossellini's singing coach for the song "Blue Velvet" in David Lynch's 1986 film Blue Velvet. Inspired by This Mortal Coil's recent cover of Tim Buckley's "Song to the Siren", Lynch had wanted Rossellini to sing her own version, but was unable to secure the rights. In its place, Badalamenti and Lynch collaborated to write "Mysteries of Love", using lyrics Lynch wrote and Badalamenti's music. Lynch asked Badalamenti to appear in the film as the piano player in the club where Rossellini's character performs. This film was the first of many projects they worked on together.

After scoring a variety of mainstream films, including A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors and National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, he scored Lynch's cult television show, Twin Peaks which featured the vocals of Julee Cruise. Many of the songs from the series were released on Cruise's album Floating into the Night. From the soundtrack of the television series, he was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for the "Twin Peaks Theme".

Other Lynch projects he worked on include the movies Wild at Heart, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive (where he has a small role as a gangster with a finicky taste for espresso), and The Straight Story as well as the television shows On the Air and Hotel Room. Other projects he has worked in include the television film Witch Hunt, and the films Naked in New York, The City of Lost Children, A Very Long Engagement, The Wicker Man, Dark Water and Secretary. He has also worked on the soundtrack for the video game Fahrenheit (known as Indigo Prophecy in North America).

He was composer for director Paul Schrader on such films as Auto Focus, The Comfort of Strangers and Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist. In 1998, Badalamenti recorded "A Foggy Day (in London Town)" with artist David Bowie for the Red Hot Organization’s compilation album Red Hot + Rhapsody a tribute to George Gershwin which raised money for various charities devoted to increasing AIDS awareness and fighting the disease. In 2005, he composed the themes for the movie Napola (Before the Fall), which were then adapted for the score by Normand Corbeil. In 2008, he directed the soundtrack of The Edge Of Love, with Siouxsie, Patrick Wolf and Beth Rowley on vocals.

Badalamenti received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the World Soundtrack Awards in 2008. On July 23, 2011, the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers presented Badalamenti with the Henry Mancini Award for his accomplishments in film and television music.


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Nicolas Cage and Laura Dern play a pair of lovers on the run in David Lynch's surrealist road movie Wild at Heart. Cage's Sailor Ripley is a violent ex-convict with an Elvis Presley fixation who falls in love with Dern's Lula Pace Fortune, the daughter of a rich, but mentally unstable, Southern belle named Marietta (Diane Ladd, Dern's real-life mother). Just after Sailor is released from prison, where he was jailed for brutally killing one of Marietta's thugs, he and Lula take off on a wild cross-country trip, pursued by his parole officer, her mother, criminals, bounty hunters, and detectives. Along the way, Sailor and Lula have a lot of sex, share their pasts, share their respective obsessions for Elvis and The Wizard of Oz, and meet a lot of bizarre characters.

After the widespread adulation over both Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks, it was clear that the soundtrack to David Lynch's ironic and brutal interpretation of the road movie wasn't going to nestle quite as snugly into the arms of popular consciousness. Classical orchestrations, duck-tailed rock & roll, and billowing Man From Another Place jazz latched onto one another with accommodating schizophrenia, lending an edge of a parasitical experience to this dark, very funny film. Take Powermad with their pinwheel-arm speed metal or Nicolas Cage crooning through a startling, charming "Love Me Tender." As impressive as it is divisive, probably the only way to score a film that includes a distressed girl trying to hold her brains in as she talks about missing pockets.



VA - David Lynch's Wild At Heart (O.S.T.)  (flac 268mb)

01 Gewandhausorchester Leipzig - Im Abendrot (Excerpt) 1:47
02 Powermad - Slaughterhouse 5:21
03 Angelo Badalamenti And Kinny Landrum - Cool Cat Walk 3:22
04 Nicolas Cage - Love Me 2:55
05 Them - Baby Please Don't Go 2:40
06 Koko Taylor - Up In Flames 6:15
07 Chris Isaak - Wicked Game 4:05
08 Gene Vincent & The Blue Caps - Be-Bop A Lula 2:35
09 Glen Gray & The Casa Loma Orchestra - Smoke Rings 3:02
10 Rubber City - Perdita 4:11
11 Chris Isaak - Blue Spanish Sky 3:55
12 Angelo Badalamenti And Kinny Landrum - Dark Spanish Symphony (Edited) (String Version) 2:35
13 Rubber City - Dark Spanish Symphony (50's Version) 2:41
14 Angelo Badalamenti And Kinny Landrum - Dark Lolita 2:14
15 Nicolas Cage - Love Me Tender 3:00

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Composer Angelo Badalamenti, who wrote the music for the television series for which this movie served as a "prequel," presents another low-key score mixing after-midnight jazz with ambient sounds, never taken at more than a medium tempo. The mood is dark and languid, appropriate to the unusual tone of the TV show and movie. Jimmy Scott and Julee Cruise contribute eerie vocals to songs with lyrics by director David Lynch. As the soundtrack to the 'prequel' movie of the Twin Peaks series, this album captures perfectly the essence of 'Fire Walk With Me'. It is an extremely dark album, for the most part. This album is much more acid jazz and noir than even the Twin Peaks soundtrack, and it is god-awfully beautiful.



Angelo Badalamenti - O.S.T. Fire Walk With Me (flac  295mb)

01 Theme From Twin Peaks - Fire Walk With Me 6:40
02 The Pine Float 3:58
03 Sycamore Trees 3:52
04 Don't Do Anything (I Wouldn't Do) 7:17
05 A Real Indication 5:31
06 Questions In A World Of Blue 4:50
07 The Pink Room 4:02
08 The Black Dog Runs At Night 1:45
09 Best Friends 2:12
10 Moving Through Time 6:41
11 Montage From Twin Peaks - Girl Talk / Birds In Hell / Laura Palmer's Theme / Falling 5:27
12 The Voice Of Love 3:55

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This soundtrack is absolutely amazing. Badalamenti is in top form, and there's not a single track on here which disappoints.

Twin Peaks Theme - From the opening guitar, you're instantly brought to the minds-eye vistas of scenic Twin Peaks- Douglas Firs, mountains, a mill, and... just a slight undertone of darkness. Laura Palmer's Theme - Now, the true depths of the album are introduced. The minimal piano in the background only underscores the feelings of apprehension, suspicion, and paranoia... with just a hint of lightness popping up around 1:04... only to be brought back into the shadows at 1:56. Audrey's Dance - Evocative of an old Private I movie... or a derelict Old-South speak easy... or a small-town strip club reeking of Parliaments and cheap whiskey. This track paints a definite picture- your experiences in life will determine the color palette. The Nightingale - Julee Cruise lends her voice to several tracks on this and other Twin Peaks works, and she is nothing short of amazing.  Freshly Squeezed - Similar in feel to 'Audrey's Dance', this one would fit perfectly in a smoky old jazz club.  The Bookhouse Boys - God, that intro sax just cuts right through you. The brushed drums, the haphazard hi-hats, it all comes together in a haze of pure mystery. Into The Night - This track will have you on your knees. Cruise devastates the yearning, the loss, the anxiety, the redemption. Night Life in Twin Peaks this song will definitely scratch your nerves. Dance of the Dream Man - Whereas Audrey's Dance made you want to indulge your inner pole-dancer, this one will have you feeling Rat-Pack-ready. Jazzy and urban, haunting and upbeat, this one will have you ironing out a nice shirt and trying to figure out how to exactly to 'put on the Ritz'. Love Theme from Twin Peaks - Opens with even more throbbing anxiety than Laura Palmer's Theme, the highs get a little higher and the lows get a little lower. A deep one. Falling - Oh, Julee Cruise. Julee, Julee Cruise. This soundtrack could serve as the perfect gateway drug to your wondrousness, the perfect song to wrap up the album. .

This album is extremely cohesive. The instrumentals are perfectly balanced by Cruise, and both categories of song are represented perfectly. A great album for late-night listening, road trips, nostalgia, and dark wistful days. The music from Twin Peaks is dark, cloying, and obsessive -- and one of the best scores ever written for television.



Angelo Badalamenti - Twin Peaks (flac 255mb)

01 Twin Peaks Theme 4:45
02 Laura Palmer's Theme 5:08
03 Audrey's Dance 5:15
04 The Nightingale (Voc Julee Cruise) 4:54
05 Freshly Squeezed 3:48
06 The Bookhouse Boys 3:24
07 Into The Night (Voc Julee Cruise) 4:42
08 Night Life In Twin Peaks 3:23
09 Dance Of The Dream Man 3:39
10 Love Theme From Twin Peaks 4:34
11 Falling (Voc Julee Cruise) 5:18

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The Twin Peaks Archive by David Lynch and Angelo Badalamenti is an album with rare and unreleased tracks from both the television series as well as the prequel film.The counter officially stops at a whopping 212. Two hundred and twelve previously unreleased Twin Peaks tracks. The catalog was initially released between 2011 and 2012 via davidlynch.com. None of the 212 songs were —at least in their full-length form— previously included in the Music From Twin Peaks, Twin Peaks Season Two Music And More and   Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me soundtracks. Rare Twin Peaks production stills appeared in the background on David Lynch’s website.

There are currently no plans to release Twin Peaks Archive by Angelo Badalamenti and David Lynch as a physical album, and they’ve been removed from davidlynch.com. But today, you can purchase download the entire catalog of nearly 10 hours of music as a digital download for only US $9.90 . Here, expect every Sundaze posting to end with 70 minutes plus batch of tracks the coming 8 weeks.



Angelo Badalamenti and David Lynch - Twin Peaks Archive part 2   (flac 318mb)

025 Secret Country 3:01
026 Dark Mood Woods (Full Version) 4:30
027 RR Swing 2:00
028 Great Northern Piano Tune #1 1:14
029 Great Northern Piano Tune #2 (Truman And Josie) 1:13
030 Great Northern Piano Tune #3 3:30
031 Twin Peaks Theme (Solo Piano) 1:25
032 Girl Talk 2:07
033 Birds In Hell 4:23
034 Audrey's Prayer (Synth Version) 2:16
035 Audrey's Prayer (Clarinet & Synth) 2:14
036 The Norwegians 1:20
037 Sneaky Audrey 1:29
038 Freshly Squeezed (Solo Vibraphone) 1:42
039 Miss Twin Peaks (Piano Rehearsal) 1:04
040 Miss Twin Peaks Theme 1:40
041 Lana's Dance 1:17
042 Lucy's Dance 1:32
043 Miss Twin Peaks (Finale) 1:26
044 Sycamore Trees (Instrumental) 4:11
045 South Sea Dreams 1:27
046 Hula Hoppin' 0:58
047 Love Theme (Piano And Rhodes) 5:02
048 Owl Cave 2:57
049 Slow Speed Orchestra 1 (24 Hours) 8:13
050 Slow Speed Orchestra 2 (Unease Motif / The Woods) 3:29
051 Slow Speed Orchestra 3 (Black Lodge Rumble) 6:52
052 Half Speed Orchestra 1 (Stair Music / Danger Theme) 2:36
053 Half Speed Orchestra 2 (Dark Forces) 2:02
054 Half Speed Orchestra 3 (Windom Earle's Motif) 1:42

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May 27, 2017

RhoDeo 1721 Grooves

Hello, the Giro is coming to an exiting finish after race leader Dumoulin showed weekness today and lost his jersey to Quintana, but he is still close second with Nibali and Pinot breathing down his neck, all within a minute with mountain top finish tomorrow and as final a 30k timetrial, all to play for....meanwhile  200 miles to the west it's the Grand Prix of Monaco will it conjure up some drama or not, will Verstappen finish ? Will Ferrari win it ?


Today's artist is a three-time Grammy Award–winner known for his distinctive bass-baritone voice and romantic image, his greatest success came in the 1970s as a solo singer and with The Love Unlimited Orchestra, crafting many enduring soul, funk, and disco songs such as his two biggest hits, "You're the First, the Last, My Everything" and "Can't Get Enough of Your Love, Babe". During the course of his career in the music business, he achieved 106 gold albums worldwide, 41 of which also attained platinum status. He is one of the world's best-selling artists of all time. He was at home appearing on Soul Train, guesting with a full band on The Today Show, and appearing in cartoon form in various episodes of The Simpsons. . ..... N'joy

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Born in Galveston, TX, Barry White grew up singing gospel songs with his mother and taught himself to play piano. Shortly after moving from Texas to South Central Los Angeles, White made his recording debut at the tender age of 11, playing piano on Jesse Belvin's "Goodnight My Love." He made his first record when he was 16 with a group called the Upfronts. The song was called "Little Girl" on a local L.A. label called Lummtone Records. Later he worked for various independent labels around Los Angeles, landing an A&R position with Bob Keane, the man responsible for the first pop recordings by Sam Cooke. One of his labels, Mustang, was hot at the time with a group called the Bobby Fuller Four in 1966. White was hired for 40 dollars a week to do A&R for Keane's family of labels: Del-Fi, Mustang and Bronco. During this time, White flirted with the idea of being a recording artist, making a record for Bronco called "All in the Run of a Day." But he chose to stick with his A&R duties. One of the first groups he worked with was the Versatiles who later changed their name to the 5th Dimension. White's first big hit came from an artist familiar to dancefloor denizens -- Viola Wills, whose "Lost Without the Love of My Guy" went Top 20 R&B. His salary went up to 60 dollars a week. White started working with the Bobby Fuller Four. Bob Keene and Larry Nunes -- who later became White's spiritual advisor and true friend -- wanted to cut a female act. White had heard about a singer named Felice Taylor. They had three hit records, "It May Be Winter Outside," "I'm Under the Influence of Love," and "I Feel Love Coming On." They were huge hits in England. White started making 400 dollars a week.

When Bronco went out of business, White began doing independent production. Those were some lean times for White. Veteran arranger Gene Page, who would later arrange or co-arrange White's hits, helped him out, giving him work and non-repayable loans. Then three years later, Paul Politti, who also worked at Bronco, contacted him to tell him that Larry Nunes was interested in starting a business with him. Nunes had started cutting tracks for a concept album he was working on. Meanwhile, White had started working with this girl group who hadn't done any singing professionally. They rehearsed for almost a year. White wrote "Walkin' in the Rain (With the One I Love)" with lyrics that were inspired by conversations with one of the singers, Glodean James (who would later become White's second wife). White christened the group Love Unlimited.

Larry Nunes took the record to Russ Regan, who was the head of the Uni label owned by MCA. Love Unlimited's From a Girl's Point of View became a million-seller. Soon after, Regan left Uni for 20th Century Records. Without Regan, White's relationship with Uni soured. With his relationship with Uni in chaos and Love Unlimited contract-bound with the label, White decided he needed to work with another act. He wanted to work with a male artist. He made three song demos of himself singing and playing the piano. Nunes heard them and insisted that he re-record and release them as a recording artist. They argued for days about it. Then he somehow convinced White to do it. White was still hesitating up to the time the label copy was made. He was going to use the name "White Heat," but the record became the first Barry White album. That first album was 1973's I've Got So Much to Give on 20th Century Records. It included the title track and "I'm Gonna Love You Just a Little More Baby."

White got a release from Uni for Love Unlimited and they joined him over at 20th Century Records. Then he had a brainstorm for another concept album. He told Regan he wanted to do an instrumental album. Regan thought he had lost it. White wanted to call it the Love Unlimited Orchestra. The single, "Love's Theme," went to number one pop, was a million-seller, and was a smash all over the world. The song earned him a BMI award for over three million covers.

For the next five years, from 1974 to 1979, there was no stopping the Barry White Hit Train -- his own Stone Gon, Barry White Sings Love Songs for the One You Love ("It's Ecstasy When You Lay Down Next to Me," "Playing Your Game Baby"), Let the Music Play (title track, "You See the Trouble with Me"), Just Another Way to Say I Love You ("I'll Do for You Anything You Want Me To," "Love Serenade"), The Man ("Your Sweetness Is My Weakness," "Sha La La Means I Love You," "September When We Met," a splendid cover of Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are"), and Love Unlimited's In Heat ("I Belong to You," "Move Me No Mountain," "Share a Little Love in Your Heart," and "Love's Theme," with lyrics). He also scored a soundtrack for the 20th Century Fox film The Together Brothers, enjoying a resurgence on home video.

His studio band included such luminaries as guitarists Ray Parker, Jr. (pre-Raydio, co-writer with White on "You See the Trouble With Me"), bassist Nathan East, Wah Wah Watson, David T. Walker, Dean Parks, Don Peake, bassist Wilton Felder of the Crusaders, Lee Ritenour, drummer Ed Greene, percussionist Gary Coleman, and later keyboardist Rahn Coleman. His hit streak seemed, well, unlimited. Then it all derailed. Russ Regan and another ally, Hosea Wilson, left 20th Century Records and White was left with management that he thought of in less than glowing terms.

White left after fulfilling his contract with two more album releases, Love Unlimited Orchestra's My Musical Bouquet and his own I Love to Sing the Songs I Sing. White signed a custom label deal with CBS Records. At the time it was touted as one of the biggest deals ever. He started a label called Unlimited Gold. The roster included White, Love Unlimited, the Love Unlimited Orchestra, Jack Perry, and a teenaged singer named Danny Pearson who charted with a song called "What's Your Sign Girl." He also did a duet album with Glodean James called Barry & Glodean. Aside from the gold album The Message Is Love, most of the albums weren't huge sellers. After eight Barry White albums, four Love Unlimited albums, four Love Unlimited Orchestra albums, constant touring, and dealing with the rigors of the music industry, White decided to take a break.

Then in 1992, White signed with A&M, releasing the albums The Man Is Back, The Right Night & Barry White, and Put Me in Your Mix (which contains a duet with Issac Hayes, "Dark and Lovely"). The Icon Is Love became his biggest-selling album since the '70s releases, going multi-platinum. It includes the platinum single "Practice What You Preach." The production lineup includes Gerald Levert and Tony Nicholas, his godson Chuckii Booker, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, and White and his longtime friend Jack Perry. While some later efforts buried his vocals in whiz-bang electronic effects, on The Icon Is Love, White's deep steam engine baritone pipes are upfront in the mix. Staying Power followed in 1999, showcased in the best tradition of soul music where the focus is the singer and the song. The album earned White two Grammys. White's career took him from the ghetto to international success with 106 gold and 41 platinum albums, 20 gold and ten platinum singles, with worldwide sales in excess of 100 million.

White, who suffered from hypertension and chronic high blood pressure, was hospitalized for kidney failure in September of 2002. He was undergoing dialysis treatment, but the combination of illnesses proved too much and he died July 4, 2003 at a West Hollywood hospital. By the time of his death, Barry White had achieved a near-universal acclaim and popularity that few artists achieve and even fewer within their own lifetime.

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Barry White turned into such iconic figure that it’s odd to hear his beginnings on his 1973 debut I’ve Got So Much to Give. In a sense, his sound is fully formed -- there’s no mistaking his velvet baritone or his lush, string-draped surrounding, particularly on the album’s closing “I’m Gonna Love You Just a Little More, Baby,” a song so seductive it set the pace for the rest of his career. Still, behind that creamy drapery it’s possible to hear a strong debt to Isaac Hayes throughout I’ve Got So Much to Give, particularly when the whole affair opens a slow, steady, eight-minute crawl through “Standing in the Shadows of Love” that strips all the bounciness out of the Supremes original, just like how all of Hayes reworkings of ‘60s pop hits turned the hit versions inside out on Hot Buttered Soul. Barry may be following in Isaac’s footsteps, but he winds up on his own path, one that isn’t quite as ambitious, one that is fairly hellbent on romance to the exclusion of everything else. Compared to what White did later, I’ve Got So Much to Give does display a fair amount of extraneous frills -- this is all about sex, but there are shifting textures and moods, it’s more serious about its seduction because White’s reputation as a loverman is not secure -- which makes it a richer, more interesting record than much of his body of work, perhaps containing some dead ends, but being all the more captivating for its slight touch of messiness.



Barry White - I've Got So Much To Give    (flac 233mb)

01 Standing In The Shadows Of Love 8:02
02 Bring Back My Yesterday 6:42
03 I've Found Someone 5:54
04 I've Got So Much To Give 8:14
05 I'm Gonna Love You Just A Little More Baby 7:11

Barry White - I've Got So Much To Give  (ogg     90mb)

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Stone Gon' was the second release in an incredible run of sensually charged titles White produced during the first half of the '70s. His patented mix of love monologues and rich vocal dynamics would come to mark the best songs of the period, including the two chart-toppers here, "Honey Please, Can't Ya See" and "Never, Never Gonna Give Ya Up." Of course, White's inventive arrangements and crack band only add to the stock of these soulful pop excursions. And beyond the hits, tracks like "You're My Baby" and "Hard to Believe That I Found You" maintain the high standard, compliments of mesmerizing backdrops and more vocal seduction; with wine and candlelight already casting a spell, it's just a matter of time before White's supremely tranquil delivery and blissed-out wash of strings and saxophone will cause the amatory to completely lose it. Bringing things back to earth, White displays unerring sensitivity on "Girl It's True, Yes I'll Always Love You," a love song as sincere and sanctified as any he's made. Essential listening.



Barry White - Stone Gon'    (flac  229mb)

01 Girl It's True, Yes I'll Always Love You 8:36
02 Honey Please, Can't Ya See 5:11
03 You're My Baby 9:08
04 Hard To Believe That I Found You 6:59
05 Never Never Gonna Give You Up 7:55

Barry White - Stone Gon'    (ogg   89mb)

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The third in White's mostly stellar run of albums on the 20th Century label, Can't Get Enough finds the bedroom alchemist coming up with another solid batch of lush, proto-disco gems. White went from strength to strength during the '70s, collaborating with co-arranger Gene Page on some of the most sophisticated and seamless charts in popular music (Philly soul architects Leon Huff, Kenny Gamble, and Thom Bell also deserve recognition in this regard). And thanks to an amazing succession of hits, White not only impressed the music cognoscenti, but repeatedly scored with the radio faithful, too -- Can't Get Enough features two of his biggest chart toppers, "You're the First, the Last, My Everything" and "Can't Get Enough of Your Love, Babe." And besides the hits, it's not just all padding here: "I Can't Believe You Love Me" and "Oh Love, Well We Finally We Made It" qualify as two of White's most fetching slow burners, while "Mellow Mood (Pts. 1 & 2)" shows off his knack for layered instrumentals. Another highlight from White's prime.



Barry White - Can't Get Enough   (flac 194mb)

01 Mellow Mood (Pt. I) 1:52
02 You're The First, The Last, My Everything 4:33
03 I Can't Believe You Love Me 10:17
04 Can't Get Enough Of Your Love, Babe 4:30
05 Oh Love, Well We Finally Made It 3:50
06 I Love You More Than Anything (In This World Girl) 4:59
07 Mellow Mood (Pt. II) 1:22

.  (ogg    mb)

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With his 1973 debut, I've Got So Much Love to Give White redefined the R&B and pop with his grand arrangements and pursuit of studio excellence. The frothy "Love's Theme" from his Love Unlimited Orchestra is considered influential early disco. By the time this was released, the sound was slightly on the wane. With his demanding schedule of cranking out an album or more a year, as well as work from Love Unlimited and Love Unlimited Orchestra This effort shows the strain. The album kicks off with "Heavenly, That's What You Are To Me," and despite its great intro, it ultimately pales in comparison to earlier tracks. On "I'll Do for You Anything You Want Me To" finds White in ragged voice throughout and the onslaught on his grunts and groans didn't help him not be a parody of himself. Just Another Way to Say I Love You seems to cautiously plod along, but White had something innovative planned here. "Love Serenade" has him throwing all caution to the wind with lines like "I don't wanna feel no clothes," followed by the even better, "And take off that brassiere, my dear." As for regular ballads, "Let Me Live My Life Lovin' You Babe" clocks in at a sleep-inducing 10:29. This album closes out with "Love Serenade (Part II)," a bass heavy, libidinous instrumental. This is not a horrible effort, but he no doubt could do much better.



Barry White - Just Another Way To Say I Love You    (flac 244mb)

01 Heavenly, That's What You Are To Me 4:59
02 I'll Do For You Anything You Want To Me 6:07
03 All Because Of You 6:34
04 Love Serenade 4:43
05 What Am I Gonna Do With You 3:36
06 Let Me Live My Life Lovin' You Babe 10:17
07 Love Serenade (Part II) 3:05

 Barry White - Just Another Way To Say I Love You (ogg  95mb)

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May 26, 2017

RhoDeo 1721 Re-Ups 99

Hello,

9 correct requests this week, all fulfilled, in short another batch of 29 re-ups.


These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a small number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here  remember to request from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned), and please check the previous update request if it's less then a year old i won't re-up either.

Looka here , requests fulfilled up to May 25th.... N'Joy

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3x Sundaze Back in Flac (Astropilot - Solar Walk 2, AstroPilot ‎- Star Walk, Astropilot -  Special Places)


3x Sundaze Back In Flac (Ishvara - Magik Square Of The Sun, Indigo Egg - Ixland, Ishq - Timelapse in Mercury )


3x Roots Back in Flac (VA - To The Music Of Morocco, Groupe Mazagan - Tajine Electrik, VA - The Rough Guide - Rai)


1x Sundaze NOW In Flac ( Philip Glass - Solo Piano)


4x Beats NOW In Flac ( Underworld - Everything, Everything, Underworld - Dark & Long,  Underworld - Dirty Epic-Cowgirl, Underworld - Dubnobasswithmyheadman  )


4x Aetix Back in Flac (Shriekback - The Infinite, Shriekback - Evolution, Shriekback - Oil And Gold, Shriekback - Big Night Music)


5x Sherwoods Back In Flac (Looplizard - Into the Sun, Ministry - Twitch , Primal Scream - Echo Dek,  Medium Medium - Glitterhouse, Suns of Arqa - Revenge of the Mozabites)


3x Aetix Back In Flac ( Richard Hell & The Voidoids - Blank Generation, Richard Hell & The Voidoids - Destiny Street Repaired, Richard Hell - Spurts (The Richard Hell Story))


3x Roots Back In Flac (Souad Massi - Deb (Heart Broken), Souad Massi - Mesk Elil (Honeysuckle),  Souad Massi - Raoui)


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May 24, 2017

RhoDeo 1721 Aetix

Hello, so it was a 22 year old nutter who blew himself up to let us all rejoice in Allah, he could have walked into a sportsbar wednesday night and score more victims, but hey these religious nutters are sexually repressed so killing young women makes much more sense. In the aftermath i'm getting irritated by all those channels repeating, it could have happened at an event near you. Disgusting nitwits projecting terror.....

Meanwhile Britain lost his stylish alpha male, the man that used to beat the bad guys usually with some tongue in cheek. I was a fan of him in Ivanhoe, the Saint and it was self evident he would become 007 a role he played 7 times until at 58 he was retired, but he remained one of the best dressed British men until his death by skin cancer today age 89, Roger Moore, R.I.P.



Today's artists are one of the legendary 4AD label's earliest and most under-recognized acts, that has had their biggest succces in the US ....N'Joy

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Formed in Colchester, Essex, England, in 1979 by Robbie Grey (vocals), Gary McDowell (guitar, vocals), and Michael Conroy (bass, vocals) originally known as the Lepers. The group expanded to "Modern English" when Richard Brown (drums) and Stephen Walker (keyboards) A debut single, "Drowning Man" was released in 1980 on the Limp Records label. The band's full-length Mesh & Lace, released by 4AD Records a year later, was inspired by the stylish gloom of Bauhaus and Joy Division, Modern English released the singles "Swans on Glass" and "Gathering Dust" before recording their 1981 debut LP Mesh & Lace. Boiling with raw anger, dissonant rhythms, and weird noises, Mesh & Lace confused and mesmerized.

The follow-up album After The Snow (1982), recorded by the same line-up, was a minor revelation, as they introduced warmth and strong guitar harmonies (most notably on the hit "I Melt With You"), rejecting the tinny bleakness of the debut. It was well received in the USA, selling 500,000 units, and the band relocated to New York to consolidate a popularity encouraged by college radio. Their album Ricochet Days had a crisper production with hits such as "Ricochet Days" and "Hands Across the Sea". However sales turned out dissapointing, as the label had expected another Melt with you hit. Exhausted from touring, Modern English began falling apart, by the time of Stop Start, released in the US by Sire Records in 1986, Walker and Brown had left (been fired) and Aaron Davidson (keyboards, guitar) had joined.

The band had tried too hard for commercial success, pushed by their label and subsequent producers. Grey returned to England to form a new outfit, but reconvened Modern English in 1990 with Davidson and Conroy. They released Pillow Lips on the TVT label, selling 300,000 units. Robie Grey and band member Ted Mason co-wrote and produced a second release for TVT recording with live strings and multiple harmonies. It received very little enthusiasm from TVT. Locked into contractual obligations with TVT, Grey subsequently put the band on hold to study and travel, and Mason handled the legal issues of getting out of the TVT deal.

Robbie Grey toured the US with a new Modern English lineup from 1998 to 2002 and travelled coast to coast across the US and recorded a new album with Hugh Jones (producer of earlier Modern English records). The songs written with guitarist Steven Walker (not to be confused with the band's original keyboardist) and including Matthew Shipley came together on the road and back home in London between tours. The owner of the masters died, the recordings were lost for a while and the band kind of fizzled out. After a few years on the shelf, this collection of songs, entitled Soundtrack, was released on 24 May 2010 on Darla, with Jon Solomon on drums.

Also in 2010, the original lineup of the band reformed (minus drummer Richard Brown) and toured the US in July and September 2010 and the UK and Paris in June 2011. They were invited by film director Mark Pellington to re-record "I Melt with You" for his movie of the same name. The current reformed line-up of the band includes original members Robbie Grey, Mick Conroy, Gary McDowell and Stephen Walker, augmented by Roy Martin on drums. They also toured the Mesh & Lace album in the U.S. in 2016. They recorded a new album which was funded via Pledge, Take Me to the Trees was recorded, produced and mixed by Martyn Young from Colourbox, who also adds additional keyboards, released late 2016. An excellent comeback..



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The debut album by this overlooked 4AD outfit from Colchester in Essex. In many ways, Modern English helped to define the sound and image of that pioneering label; while admittedly pretentious at times, they were also sharp-edged, intellectual, and obsessed with aestheticism. The standouts here are the title track, "Smiles and Laughter," and "Gathering Dust," an epic post-punk exercise in aural dynamics. The keyboard rush that they employ is one of the punkiest uses of Stephen Walker's synthesizer imaginable -- at least prior to the development of the industrial movement.



Modern English - Mesh & Lace (flac  421mb)

01 Gathering Dust 4:20
02 16 Days 4:33
03 Just A Thought 4:08
04 Move In Light 4:45
05 Grief 6:28
06 The Token Man 6:32
07 A Viable Commercial 4:24
08 Black Houses 5:44
09 Dance Of Devotion (A Love Song) 5:51
Bonus
10 Smiles And Laughter 3:12
11 Mesh And Lace 4:19
12 Tranquility Of A Summer Moment (Vice Versa) 7:02
13 Home 3:50
14 Swans On Glass 4:35
15 Incident 2:38

Modern English - Mesh & Lace   (ogg  140mb)

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"I Melt with You" will forever be the one specific moment that's Modern English's place in pop history, but the album it came from, After the Snow, isn't anything to sneeze at either. Indeed, in transforming from the quite fine but dour young miserabilists on Mesh & Lace to a brighter incarnation who still had a melancholy side, the quintet found exactly the right combination best-suited for their abilities. Like contemporaries B-Movie and the Sound, Modern English used punk and post-punk roots as a chance to introduce a haunting, beautiful take on romance and emotion, while the contributions of Stephen Walker on keyboard helped make the album both of its time and timeless. That said, the secret weapon on the album is the rhythm section of Michael Conroy and Richard Brown, able to shift from the polite but relentless tribal beat clatter on the excellent "Life in the Gladhouse" to the ever more intense punch of the title track, the album's unheralded masterpiece. None of this is to denigrate the contributions of singer Robbie Grey and guitarist Gary McDowell. The former's seemingly mannered singing actually shows a remarkable fluidity at points -- "After the Snow" again is a good reference point, as is the fraught, slow-burn epic "Dawn Chorus" -- while McDowell works around the band's various arrangements instead of trying to dominate them. Some songs, like "Face of Wood," even find Modern English -- often dogged with Joy Division comparisons early on -- predicting where New Order would go before that band got there itself. Still, "I Melt with You" is the main reason most will want to investigate further. A perfect pop moment that didn't have to strain for it, its balance of giddy sentiment and heartfelt passion matched with a rush of acoustic and electric guitar overdubs just can't be beat. After the Snow was re-released with six bonus tracks.



Modern English - After The Snow (flac 435mb)

01 Someone's Calling (4:01)
02 Life In The Gladhouse (4:22)
03 Face Of Wood (5:49)
04 Dawn Chorus (4:40)
05 I Melt With You (4:05)
06 After The Snow (3:45)
07 Carry Me Down (5:21)
08 Tables Turning (4:31)
Bonus Tracks
09 Someone's Calling (Remix) 3:46
10 Life In The Gladhouse (Remix) 5:00
11 I Melt With You (7" Mix) 3:50
12 The Prize 3:32
13 Life In The Gladhouse (12" Mix) 5:56
14 The Choicest View 11:40

Modern English - After The Snow   (ogg  167mb)

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Modern English relocated to New York City and worked on a third album, Ricochet Days. Leaving behind the artistic adventures of their first two albums (particularly impressive was 1982's After the Snow), Ricochet Days begins Modern English's slow decline toward the status of just another synth band. The material, though beautifully produced by the reliable Hugh Jones and boasting some pliable hooks, it was packed with great tunes such as "Rainbow's End", "Spinning Me Round", and "Hands Across the Sea".  The overall tone of the album was brighter than Snow, and it fit the band's sound well.  Even so, i'd still consider this much more 'gothic' than much of the music people call gothic these days - gothic isn't always all about darkness, and the basic feel certainly makes itself known from time to time on this album. Anyone into the whole 4.A.D. sound should enjoy this album, and for those who think this was a one-song band, give this one a listen before you put the period at the end of that sentence.



 Modern English - Ricochet Days (flac 317mb)

01 Rainbow's End 3:07
02 Machines 5:49
03 Spinning Me Round 4:51
04 Ricochet Days 5:13
05 Hands Across The Sea 4:54
06 Blue Waves 4:00
07 Heart 6:58
08 Chapter 12 3:57
Bonus
09 Chapter 12 (Twelve Inch Mix) 4:37
10 Ringing In The Change 4:09
11 Reflection 4:19
12 Breaking Away (Demo) 2:52

Modern English - Ricochet Days   (ogg  122mb)

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This was the group's first album after re-forming around original members Robbie Grey (vocals), Mick Conroy (bass), and ex-March Violets member Aaron Davidson (guitar/keyboards), who had joined in 1986 only to see the current lineup at that time disintegrate. The trio moved to the U.S. and conjured a minor hit single with a remixed version of the portentous "I Melt With You." The diverse record contains some easy-to-like bounce-pop ("Beauty," "Care About You") but other tracks either drift along  or sag under clichéd lyrics. Older fans of the band despaired of their new, slicker variant. Despite their modest breakthrough, the group broke up again in 1991.



Modern English - Pillow Lips (flac  212mb)
 
01 I Melt With You 3:55
02 Llife's Rich Tapestry 4:05
03 Beauty 2:24
04 You're Too Much 2:29
05 Beautiful People 3:10
06 Care About You 2:56
07 Let's All Dream 2:35
08 Coming Up For Air 3:46
09 Pillow Lips 3:30
10 Take Me Away 3:42

Modern English - Pillow Lips   (ogg 86mb)

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May 23, 2017

RhoDeo 1721 Roots

Hello, i want to tell you what a crazy day i had, but tonight in Manchester there was an explosion in the Manchester Arena foyer at the end of a concert by American singer Ariana Grande. Victims mainly youths, waiting parents thusfar 19 dead and 50 wounded, a nailbomb suicide attack just the thing those mentally stuck terrorists will do. But why now and there, when chances are Man United winning the Europaleague cup Wednesdaynight and big crowds would amass, did perhaps this nutcase have a thing with Ariana Grande ? My heart goes out to the victims and bereaved.


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Lalo Schifrin (born June 21, 1932) is an Argentine pianist, composer, arranger and conductor. He is bestknown for his film and TV scores, such as the "Themefrom Mission: Impossible ". He has received four Grammy Awards and six Oscar nominations. Schifrin, associated with the jazz music genre, is also noted for work withClint Eastwood in the late 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, par-ticularly the Dirty Harry films.

Schifrin was born in Buenos Aires to Jewish parents. His father, Luis Schifrin, led the second violin section of the orchestra at the TeatroColón for three decades. At the age of six, Schifrin began a six-year course of study on piano with Enrique Barenboim, the father of the pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim. At age 16, Schifrin began studying piano with the Greek-Russian expatriate Andreas Karalis, former head of the Kiev Conservatory, and harmony with Argentine composer Juan Carlos Paz. During this time, Schifrin also became interested in jazz. Although Schifrin studied sociology and law at the University of Buenos Aires, it was music that captured his attention.

At age 20, he successfully applied for a scholarship to the Paris Conservatoire. At night he played jazz in the Paris clubs. In 1955, Schifrin played piano with Argentinian bandoneon giant Ástor Piazzolla, and represented his country at the International Jazz Festival in Paris.

After returning home to Argentina, Schifrin formed a jazzorchestra, a16-piece band that became part of a pop-ular weekly variety show on Buenos Aires TV. Schifrin also began accepting other film, television and radio as-signments. In 1956, Schifrin met Dizzy Gillespie and offered to write an extended work for Gillespie’s big band.Schifrin completed the work, Gillespiana, in 1958 (it was recorded in 1960).

Later that year Schifrin began working as an arranger for Xavier Cugat's popular Latin dance orchestra.While in New York in 1960, Schifrin again met Gillespie, who had by this time disbanded his big band for financial reasons. Gillespie invited Schifrin to fill the vacant piano chair in his quintet. Schifrin immediately accepted and moved to New York City. Schifrin wrote a secondextended composition for Gillespie, The New Continent, which was recorded in 1962. In 1963, MGM, which hadSchifrin under contract, offered the composer his first Hollywood film assignment with the African adventure Rhino!
.
Schifrin moved to Hollywood late that year. He also radically re-arranged the theme for the popularNBC-TV series  The Man from U.N.C.L.E., altering original composer Jerry Goldsmith's theme to a jazzy melody emphasizing flutes and exotic percussion, which wound up winning the Emmy award for Best TV Theme in1965.One of Schifrin’s most recognizable and enduring com-positions is the theme music for the long-running TV se-ries Mission: Impossible. It is a distinctive tune written inthe uncommon 5/4 time signature. Similarly, Schifrin’s theme for the hugely successful  Mannix private eye TVshow was composed a year later in a 3/4 waltz time; Schifrin composed several other jazzy and bluesy num-bers over the years as additional incidental music for the show. Schifrin’s“Tar Sequence” from his Cool Hand Luke score(also written in 5/4) was the longtime theme for the Eyewitness News broadcasts on NewYork station WABC-TV and other ABC affliates, as well as National Nine News in Australia. CBS Television used part of the the me of his St. Ives soundtrack for its golf broadcasts in the1970s and early 1980s.Schifrin’s score for Coogan’s Bluff in 1968 was the beginning of a long association with Clint Eastwood and di-rector Don Siegel. Schifrin’s strong jazz blues riffs were evident in
 Dirty Harry Schifrin’s working score for 1973’s  The Exorcist was re-jected by the film’s director, William Friedkin. Schifrin had written six minutes of difficult and heavy music for the initial film trailer, but audiences were reportedly frightened by the combination of sights and sounds.Warner Bros. ecutives told Friedkin to instruct Schifr in to tone it down with softer music, but Friedkin did not relay the message. Schifrin’s final score was thrown out in to the parking lot. Schifrin reported in an interview that working with Friedkin was one of the most unpleasant ex-periences in his life.

Over the next decade, Schifrin would score films like The Cincinnati Kid, Bullitt, Cool Hand Luke, Dirty Harry, and Enter the Dragon. As a jazzer, he wrote the well-received "Jazz Mass" suite in 1965, and delved into stylish jazz-funk with 1975's CTI album Black Widow. Schifrin continued his film work all the way through the '90s; during that decade, he recorded a series of orchestral jazz albums called Jazz Meets the Symphony, and became the principal arranger for the Three Tenors, which complemented his now-dominant interest in composing classical music.

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That (then) unknown director George Lucas managed to secure legendary composer Lalo Schifrin for the cerebral, brooding soundtrack to his bleak (pre-Star Wars) science fiction tale THX 1138 is a testament to his legendary industry tenacity. Far removed from his collaborations with John Williams, THX bristles with dissonant choral sections, bursts of Latin-tinged percussion, and a whole lot of mid-'70s echo-laden flute solos. A great deal of the soundtrack's tone resembles Stanley Kubrick's chilly, classically cultivated score for 2001: A Space Odyssey -- Schifrin uses Bach's St. Matthew Passion over the end credits -- and while it's occasionally ironic and lighthearted (the spaghetti Western-themed "Source #4/Third Escape/Morgue Sequence/The Temple/Disruption/LUH's Death"), the bulk of it is just plain disjointed and disturbing -- "Torture Sequence/Prison Talk Sequence," with its cacophony of thumb pianos, bells, and hand drums, wouldn't have sounded out of place on the Wicker Man soundtrack. THX 1138 is a challenging and difficult listen, but fans will be pleased with Film Score Monthly's attention to detail and lovingly penned liner notes, and soundtrack buffs will finally fill a crucial hole in their sci-fi collections.  It has cues that are in there own way hauntingly beautiful and others that are just plain haunting. This album will work for you even if you haven't seen the movie. Once you have heard this score, you'll want to see the movie just to find out what it's all about which is what it was for me. Recommend for Schifrin fans and definitely for film score fans.



Lalo Schifrin - O.S.T. THX 1138 (flac  288mb)

01 Logo 0:08
02 Main Title / What's Wrong? 3:14
03 Room Tone / Primitive Dance 1:46
04 Be Happy / LUH / Society Montage 5:06
05 Be Happy Again (Jingle Of The Future) 0:56
06 Source #1 5:18
07 Loneliness Sequence 1:28
08 SEN / Monks / LUH Reprise 2:44
09 You Have Nowhere To Go 1:12
10 Torture Sequence / Prison Talk Sequence 3:42
11 Love Dream / The Awakening 1:47
12 First Escape 3:01
13 Source #3 3:34
14 Second Escape 1:16
15 Source #4 / Third Escape / Morgue Sequence / The Temple / Disruption / LUH's Death 8:31
16 Source #2 3:17
17 The Hologram 0:56
18 First Chase / Foot Chase / St. Matthew Passion (End Credits) 7:40

Lalo Schifrin - O.S.T. THX 1138 (ogg  144mb)

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In 1973, Lalo Schifrin tackled a new challenge by writing the score for Enter the Dragon, an ambitious martial arts film that was the American debut of cult legend Bruce Lee. The resulting score combined Schifrin's penchant for adding jazz and funk elements to the traditional film scoring style with elements of traditional Chinese music, giving the whole combination a new, ethnic flavor. The best example of this unique fusion is the film's "Main Titles": After establishing itself with a combination of jazzy horn stabs and funky wah-wah guitar, this inventive tune layers a Chinese-style melody played by strings and synthesizers over the insistent rhythms, creating a composition that cuts across several different musical genres while still fulfilling the requirements for an exciting action film theme. Another showcase for the film's fusion of Chinese and jazz styles is "Su Lin (The Monk)," which layers Asian-styled melodic elements over churning jazz rhythms. Other highlights in the action-oriented style include "Bamboo Birdcage," which alternates moody, wind instrument-driven sections with outbursts of horn-driven funk, and "The Big Battle," which restates several of the film's action themes over a percolating bass line. There are also a few quiet interludes, like the sax-driven mid-tempo jazz of "The Gentle Softness." The result is an entertainingly diverse soundtrack whose musical invention makes it just as entertaining when listened to away from the film. Collector's note: This soundtrack was reissued in 1998 by Warner Bros. as part of a deluxe video reissue of the film in an expanded edition that restored all of the film's musical cues to the album.



Lalo Schifrin - O.S.T.Enter the Dragon   (flac  310mb)

01 Prologue - The First Fight 2:36
02 Main Titles 2:20
03 Su-Lin (The Monk) 4:57
04 Sampans And Flashbacks 6:21
05 Han's Island 2:57
06 The Banquet 3:02
07 Headset Jazz 2:10
08 The Gentle Softness 2:40
09 Into The Night 3:44
10 Goodbye Oharra 1:54
11 Bamboo Birdcage 2:32
12 Han's Cruelty 2:09
13 The Human Fly 3:36
14 The Big Battle 4:47
15 Broken Mirrors 5:55
16 End Titles 1:10
17 Main Titles (Alternate) 3:17

 Lalo Schifrin - O.S.T.Enter the Dragon   (ogg   131mb)

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One of the jewels of the Label X library -- and that is saying something, considering what else is in there -- this album represents some of the most exquisite music in Lalo Schifrin's output. The music for Richard Lester's The Four Musketeers has the composer working in a distinctly European mode, very much in the manner of period concert music (ranging across a couple of centuries, as well as embracing the Hollywood and 1950's European film traditions) -- but the scoring and orchestrations, as well as some of the twists in tempo, show a few exotic twists in the details that are pure Schifrin. The result is sort of Schifrin's version of what could have been an Erich Wolfgang Korngold score -- and it's worth every minute of the listening, repeated many times over. The album is filled out with Schifrin's music for two World War II-related subjects, the thriller The Eagle Has Landed and the drama Voyage of the Damned. The former, written for a fictional thriller, relies on rich, frenzied string passages, very much in the manner of early John Barry but more animated, and ultimately -- at least until the end credit music -- very interesting to hear, even divorced from the film. The latter is much more restrained and takes its time getting listeners to where it is going, with scoring that is far more closely tied to its period (1939) and setting -- "effect" music as much as dramatic scoring, with some of the music written in the styles of the times, including a Latin-flavored section for "Hotel Nacionale" and a foxtrot for the end credit music. The quality of the recording of all three scores is excellent, and the transfer improves upon the original LP release.



Lalo Schifrin - O.S.T. The 4 Musketeers (flac  294mb)

The Four Musketeers
01 Overture
02 Atho's Story
03 Chase To The Convent
04 Musketeers Rescue Constance
05 Breakfast At The Bastion
06 A Lovely Adventure
07 Chased From The Louvre
08 Frozen Pond Fight
09 Milady's Theme
10 End Credits
The Eagle Has Landed
11 Main Title
12 The Eagle Grows, Pt.1
13 The Eagle Grows, Pt.2
14 Flight Of The Eagles
15 Eagle Verses Fox
16 End Credits
Voyage Of The Damned
17 Main Title
18 House Painter March
19 Hotel Nacionale
20 Lament
21 Tragedy; Time Pulse
22 Our Prayers Have Been Answered
23 End Credits

Lalo Schifrin - O.S.T. The 4 Musketeers (ogg  132mb)

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Although he is best-known for film scores like Bullitt and Enter The Dragon, prolific composer Lalo Schifrin has always maintained a side career as a jazz musician. He racked up a massive success in this field in 1976 with Black Widow, a slick instrumental excursion that combined the musical dexterity of jazz with the dance-friendly rhythms of disco. This album found Schifrin turning his skills as an arranger and keyboardist to a set of material that matched up some unlikely but effective covers with a few originals. Highlights among the covers include "Quiet Village," which transforms the exotica classic into a slow-burning funk vamp dressed with plenty of spacey synthesizer, and "Moonglow & Theme From Picnic," which reworks these classic film themes by giving them keyboard-driven arrangements that are gently nudged along by an insistent beat. Black Widow also spawned a dancefloor hit with Schifrin's imaginative reworking of "Jaws," which transformed John Williams' spooky monster-movie theme into an ominous, percolating slice of nocturnal funk built on wah-wah guitar and Schifrin's elegantly jazzy keyboard excursions. In terms of the original tunes, the standout is the title track, a keyboard showcase that weaves surging strings around a funky bass groove that is fleshed out with all manner of synth and electric piano shadings. The strong disco edge to the proceedings may turn off jazz purists, but Schifrin's imaginative and stylish arrangements keep the music from succumbing to disco-beat boredom, and his expert backup band (including session stalwarts like Andy Newmark and John Tropea) attacks the material with energy and style to burn. The end result is one of the peak albums in Lalo Schifrin's lengthy catalogue and a necessity for anyone interested in his jazz work.



Lalo Schifrin - Black Widow (flac  382mb)

01 Black Widow 4:11
02 Flamingo 4:31
03 Quiet Village 5:45
04 Moonglow & Theme From " Picnic " 6:13
05 Jaws 6:47
06 Baia 4:49
07 Turning Point 3:29
08 Dragonfly 5:45
Bonus
09 Frenesi 3:53
10 Tabu 4:33
11 Baia (Alt. Take) 7:44
12 Con Alma 6:30

Lalo Schifrin - Black Widow (ogg  159mb)

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