Jan 31, 2017

RhoDeo 1705 Roots

Hello,

The music of Brazil encompasses various regional music styles influenced by African, European and Amerindian forms. After 500 years of history, Brazilian music developed some unique and original styles such as samba, bossa nova, MPB, sertanejo, pagode, tropicalia, choro, maracatu, embolada (coco de repente), mangue bit, funk carioca (in Brazil simply known as Funk), frevo, forró, axé, brega, lambada, and Brazilian versions of foreign musical genres, such as Brazilian rock and rap.


Today's artist became popular with the songs Se Acaso Você Chegasse, her first single, Mas Que Nada, A Carne, and other well-known samba songs. She was nominated to the Grammy Awards and was elected by the BBC London as "the singer of the millennium." In 2007, Soares was invited to sing a cappella the Brazilian National Anthem at the opening ceremony of the 2007 Panamerican Games. In 2016, she performed at the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, where she sang O Canto de Ossanha, a classic by Baden Powell and Vinícius de Moraes......N'Joy

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Owner of a distinctive, harsh voice (even if considering the conspicuous Armstrong mannerisms), Elza Soares is one of the most swinging samba singers. Having appeared in 1959 with the samba "Se Acaso Você Chegasse," Soares always had her artistic career complicated by her personal life, which certainly impeded her enjoyment of a more widespread popularity. Having gotten married at 12 and lost three children who died of hunger, she later became the wife of Garrincha, one of the most genial soccer players ever, and also a chronic alcoholic. The peak of her career was in the '60s, with albums like O Máximo em Samba (1967), Elza Soares & Wilson das Neves (1968), and Elza, Miltinho e Samba (a three-album series shared with Miltinho). In that decade she had several hits, among them "Boato," "Edmundo" (a version of "In the Mood"), "Beija-me," "Devagar Com a Louça," "Mulata Assanhada," "O Mundo Encantado de Monteiro Lobato," "Bahia de Todos os Deuses," "Palmas no Portão," and "Palhaçada." In the '70s, she had further success with "Salve a Mocidade" (1974) and "Malandro" (1977; this song launched Jorge Aragão as a composer). But it wasn't enough to prevent her from facing huge economical adversity, and at the same time she was being systematically turned away by recording companies. With Garrincha, Soares had a very troubled marriage and the untimely demise of their son Garrinchinha in 1986 in a car accident didn't help.

Living in extreme poverty throughout her childhood and teens, Soares had her first audition in radio at Ary Barroso's novice show when she was 16, winning first place. She was then hired as a crooner by the Orquestra Garam de Bailes (led by conductor Joaquim Naegli). She worked in the orchestra until 1954, when she became pregnant. In 1955, she was invited to star with Grande Otelo in the play Jour-Jou-Fru-Fru, which was a smash. Three years later, she toured Argentina, returning in the next year when she was hired by Rádio Vera Cruz. Also in 1959, she recorded a 78 rpm with "Se Acaso Você Chegasse" (Lupício Rodrigues/Felisberto Martins), one of her biggest hits. In 1960, she went to São Paulo where she performed regularly in the show I Festival Nacional de Bossa Nova and recorded her first LP, Se Acaso Você Chegasse. In 1962, she represented Brazil in Chile during the World Soccer Cup, where she met Garrincha.

Having recorded several albums with the hits "Só Danço Samba" (Tom Jobim/Vinícius de Moraes), "A Banca do Distinto" (Billy Blanco), "Pressentimento" (Elton Medeiros/Hermínio Bello de Carvalho), and "Princesa Isabel" (Sérgio Ricardo), she moved to Italy in 1969, where she performed at the Sistina Theater (Rome), returning to Brazil in 1972. In the same year, she opened the show Elza em Dia de Graça at the Opinião Theater (Rio) and participated in the Brasil Export Show (Canecão). Rediscovered in the '80s as a cult heroine by Os Titãs, she performed with the band in a regular show at the Madame Satã nightclub.

Trying unsuccessfully to develop a career abroad, she returned to Brazil in 1994, poor and depressed. Finally, she was rediscovered in the '80s by the younger generations of Brazilian rockers (Os Titãs, Lobão) and MPB artists like Caetano Veloso, having been awarded with a Sharp Prize award as the Best Samba Singer of 1997. Soares also recorded in duet with Caetano Veloso on his album, Velô, and with Lobão on Casa de Samba. With her Trajetória (1997), in which she was paid tribute by Zeca Pagodinho, she won the Prêmio Sharp Award as Best Samba Singer.Her life was depicted in the musical Crioula, which had several songs written specially for her by Chico Buarque, Chico César, Nei Lopes, and others.  In November 1999, Soares participated in the show Desde Que o Samba é Samba (at Royal Albert Hall, London, England), together with Chico Buarque, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, Gal Costa, and Virginia Rodrigues. In 2000, her life was depicted in the musical Crioula (by Stella Miranda). In 2000, she was appointed Singer of the Millennium by London's BBC. Soares continues to challenge her destiny, performing shows in every venue available.

Do Cóccix Até O Pescoço In 2002, she released the acclaimed Do Cóccix Até O Pescoço on Maianga Discos, which successfully wedded samba, bossa, and MPB with electronic sounds. Produced and recorded by Alê Siqueira, it featured an enormous cast of guest musicians under the direction of pianist Jose Miguel Wisnik, including Caetano Veloso, Chico Buarque, and Carlinhos Brown. It sold well internationally and received a Grammy nomination. Vivo Feliz followed on Tratore in 2004 and contained the singles "Rio de Janiero" and a reading of "Concordia" by Nando Reis, featuring the songwriter in a duet. Working again with Wisnik, she released the live Beba-Me Ao Vivo and a concert DVD with the same title in 2007.

Though Soares continued to perform, she took an extended break from recording. A year later she was the featured vocalist on the soundtrack of the film Chega de Saudade. She fell from the stage during a performance and required numerous spinal column surgeries. It slowed her down and forced her to perform in a chair, but she never stopped. In 2015, she re-entered the studio with with producer Guilherme Kastrup of São Paulo’s groundbreaking samba sujo scene. She didn't like his idea of recording a set of classic sambas in modern settings and instead insisted on creating entirely original new material -- a first in her long career. He hired the city's vanguard post-punk band Passo Torto (with Metá Metá's Kiko Dinucci) and several players from Bixiga 70. A Mulher Do Fim Do Mundo, a collection of 11 songs (culled from over 50), focuses on the achievement of justice for women, people of color, and members of the LGBT community -- causes she had celebrated throughout her life. Issued in Brazil in October by Circus Produções Culturais, it was celebrated in the national press as the year's best album by a national artist, regardless of genre. Due to global acclaim, it was re-released internationally by Mais Um Discos in June of 2016.


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The Odeon crew wer really getting into the swing of things by the time Soares laid this one down... The downbeat is getting a bit funkier and jazzier, and the horn arrangements have loosened up a bit. Seems she finally hit a groove with Nelsinho and his crew... Some tracks, like "Quizumba" and "Deixa A Nega Gingar" are a real blast, while others are a bit more by-the-numbers. Overall, though, this is a strong album, fun from start to finish. O Maximo Em Samba is quite a bit brassier and more shrill-sounding...  A little aggressive, although Soares does deliver some powerful vocals.



Elza Soares - Com A Bola Branca, O Máximo Em Samba (flac  511mb)

01 Quizumba
02 Estatuto Da Gafieira
03 Nem Vem, Nem Vai
04 No Carnaval
05 Jogado Fora
06 A Vida Como Ela E
07 A Infelicidade
08 Deixa A Nega Gingar
09 Brincadeira Tem Hora
10 Volta Pro Morro
11 Meu Tudo E Por Que
12 Tudo E Balanco
O Máximo Em Samba
13 O Mundo Encantado De Monteiro Lobato
14 Conversa De Botequim
15 Tristeza
16 Agora É Cinza
17 Louco (Ela É O Seu Mundo)
18 O Orvalho Vem Caindo
19 Atira A Primeira Pedra
20 Devagar Com A Louça
21 Vem Morar Comigo
22 Você Não Tem Palavra
23 Leva Meu Samba
24 P'ra Machucar Meu Coração
bonus
25 Palmas no portão
26 Me deixa em paz
27 Nostalgia
28 Vou deixar cair

Elza Soares - Com A Bola Branca, O Máximo Em Samba  (ogg  182mb)

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This was Elza's first duet pairing with samba-cancao elder Miltinho, a veteran performer with Anjos do Inferno and other classic vocal groups... It's a solid effort, though a bit stagey and reserved, especially in comparison to her solo work. But it also demonstrates her range, and her connection to samba's historical past, with songs from Haroldo Barbosa, Herivelto Martins, Noel Rosa, Ismael Silva and several less well-know composers of the pre-bossa era... A nice window onto an antiquated style, and an intriguing snapshot of Miltinho midway through his latter-years solo career. (After recording three albums with Soares, he went on to do a series of duet records with Doris Monteiro...) I wasn't blown away by this one, but it's certainly worth checking out if you're into the whole "radio singers" thing...
Baterista-Wilson Das Neves is one of Soares' strongest, most groove-laden albums, made with the assist of drummer Wilson Das Neves. This album was sampled from liberally for the Meus Momentos collection below, notably songs such as "Palhacada," "Se Acaso Voce Chegasse," and "Edmundo," (a Brazilianified version of "In The Mood," with a chaotic, swinging beat). Soares was making a strong bid to be a Brazilian sambadelic version of Ella Fitzgerald, and actually she did a pretty good job of it



Elza Soares - Elza Miltinho E Samba, Baterista-Wilson Das Neves   (flac  478mb)

01 Com Que Roupa-Si Você Jurar
02 Beijo Na Bôca-Moreninha Do Pom Pom Grená-Tem Que Ter
03 Boogie-Woogie Na Favela-Bonitâo-Eu Quero Um Samba-Pourquoi (Essa Nêga Sem Sandália)
04 Se Você Visse
05 Todo Dia É Dia
06 Enlouqueci-Fica Doido Varrido-Obsessão-Só Eu Sei-E Bom Parar-Calado Venci-Vai Que Depois Eu Vou-Já Vai?
07 Mal De Amor
08 Antonico
09 Louco De Saudade

Baterista: Wilson Das Neves
10 Balanço Zona Sul
11 Deixa Isso Prá La
12 Garôta De Ipanema
13 Edmundo (In The Mood)
14 O Pato
15 Copacabana
16 Teleco Teco Nº 2
17 Saudade Da Bahia
18 Samba De Verão
19 Se Acaso Você Chegasse
20 Mulata Assanhada
21 Palhaçada

Bonus
22 Sofri
23 Bonde se São Januário-Zé marmita-O trem atrasou-Sapato de pobre
24 Pam-pam-pam
25 Pode o mundo se acabar

Elza Soares - Elza Miltinho E Samba, Baterista: Wilson Das Neves    (ogg   178mb)

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Elza Soares's superb samba accompaniment, melded to a slightly frantic brass band (with a too-prominent trombone and bass saxophone combo...) Her voice is, frankly, a bit grating on most of this album, but the cuica-and-pandeiro rhythmic percussion is awesome. Unfortunately, the liner notes don't say who the musicians were -- Nelsinho is listed as the arranger, but which samba crew they got to join his band is anyone's guess. At any rate, this is a pretty interesting record... The closing number, "Se E Pecado Sambar," is perhaps the single best song on here, where all the elements -- including her voice -- work perfectly together.



Elza Soares - Elza, Miltinho e Samba, vol. 2, Elza, Carnaval & Samba (flac 465mb)

01 Dialogo De Criolos
02 Alô Alô / Pelo Telefone
03 Semana Inteira / O Pau Comeu Na Casa De Noca
04 Vaidosa / Me Deixa Em Paz / Para Me Livrar Do Mal
05 Tem Pena De Mim
06 Você Jà Foi À Bahia / Vestido De Bolero
07 Mancada / Vai Haver Barulho No Château
08 Promessa / Confessou / Quem Chorou Fui Eu
09 Pot Pourri De Imitação

Elza, Carnaval & Samba
10 Bahia de todos os deuses
11 Quero marrer no carnaval
12 Não me diaga adues
13 Eu chorarei amanhã
14 De lanterna na mão
15 Fechei a porta
16 Heróis da liberdade
17 Rosa Maria
18 Eu agora sou feliz
19 Que samba bom
20 Falam de mim
21 Se é pecado sambar
Bonus
22 Lapinha
23 Onde De Esta Meu Samba ?
24 Chove Chuva Va

Elza Soares - Elza, Miltinho e Samba, vol. 2, Elza, Carnaval & Samba (ogg  162mb)

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Jan 30, 2017

RhoDeo 1705 Vibrations 6

Hello,

Brainwave Mind Voyages arose from a thirst for experiential wisdom and a hunger for sharing mind-expanding tools with other like-minded people such as yourself. Shower the seeds of self-empowerment with some modern audio technology, and voila! ....N'Joy

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Your brain operates much like a resonance chamber or a tuning fork. When you hold two similarly tuned tuning forks together and strike one of the them, the other will also vibrate at the same frequency. The vibrational rate or vibratory frequency determines the tone. Our brain produces waves of currents that flow throughout its neural pathways. The type of brainwave is defined by the frequency at which it is pulsing, and this particular rate of pulsation determines our respective state of mind at any given moment in time.

There are four common types of brainwave patterns, but due to the complexity of our brains there are often several patterns interacting at one time. It is the predominance of one particular brainwave frequency that determines our state of mind. For example, if you are in a beta state, there may be trace levels of alpha and theta but they would minimal compared to the dominating amount of beta present. All of these brainwave states have been scientifically studied and categorized by the subjective states that each range will produce. Below is a simple chart containing the four common types of brainwave frequencies along with their characteristic features and associated mental states. The frequencies are measures in hertz (Hz) which is roughly translated as beats per second or cycles per second.

BETA waves 13 to 30 Hz the fastest waves, most commonly found during our waking state, associated with outward awareness, engaged mind, arousal, actively perceiving and evaluating forms of data through the senses; also present with fear, anger, worry, hunger, and surprise.

ALPHA waves 7 to 13 Hz associated with non-drowsy but relaxed, tranquil state of consciousness, less engagement and arousal, pleasant inward awareness, body/mind integration, present during meditation and states of relaxation

THETA waves 3 to 7 Hz associated with increased recall, creativity, imagery and visualization , free-flowing thought, future planning, inspiration, drowsiness, present during dreaming and REM states

DELTA waves .1 to 3 Hz associated with deep dreamless sleep, deep trance state pituitary release of growth hormone, self-healing, present during deep levels of non-REM sleep.

Your brain is always producing electromagnetic brainwaves that have a measurable frequency and magnitude. The characteristics of your brainwaves at any given moment determines your mood and state of mind. The frequency range and magnitude identify whether you are aroused, alert, asleep or anywhere in between these states.

We are always expanding our knowledge of how our brainwaves can be harnessed to create peak states of consciousness. For example, the best moments of creativity, those Eureka! flashes, occur mostly when theta waves are predominant. The hypnogogic state verging between waking and sleeping is characterized by theta brainwave activity. This explains why we have such great ideas before falling asleep. It is noted in history books that this "border-zone" time period has been utilized by many scientists and other great thinkers who have had flashes of insight while experiencing this holistic state of mind.

Einstein came up with the theory of relativity in this state, and likewise, one of the Watson and Crick pair conceptualized the double helix of DNA in this highly visualistic mind state successfully cracking the illusive architecture of DNA. Time spent in this "border-zone" can be time very well spent. All this information about brainwaves is a preamble to the matter of entraining your brainwaves to specific frequencies.

You can now use the process of brainwave entrainment to tune your brainwaves to any brainwave range. You can experience theta, alpha, delta or even combinations of ranges using multi-layered frequencies that blend several brainwave ranges into one synergistic brainwave pattern like the Awakened Mind Brainwave Pattern. The breakthrough occurs when we use this principle of entrainment to synchronize our brainwaves to specific chosen frequencies. We can do this easily by using binaural beat audio technology and monophonic entrainment tones, as you will soon learn, but first some more background information.

THE TWO HEMISPHERES OF THE BRAIN

Our brains have a left and a right hemisphere. The left hemisphere is linear, logical, practical, and time orientated. The right hemisphere seems to be much more non-linear, abstract, creative, holistic, and non-logical. We tend to use one hemisphere at a time, or better said, we will favor particular hemispheres depending on what we are doing. An accountant probably uses less of his right hemisphere than an artist would during the course of his workday. If you are doing math you would be using more of your left side. If you are painting a picture, you would have more right hemispheric activity.

Obviously, it is not that simplistic because both hemispheres are constantly interacting and both can be in use at the same time. These hemispheres are connected by the corpus callosum. It serves as a conduit or a bridge between both sides. This bridge can literally be exercised and strengthened until it is physically larger and more capable of transmitting data, thoughts and feedback between hemispheres. The famous clairvoyant healer Edgar Cayce was found to have an unusually large corpus callosum, but could it be that everyone else simply has not developed this hemispheric bridge?

By merging both hemispheres and allowing them to work together we can increase our mental fitness and enhance our cognitive functioning in general. It is basically like having a faster computer processor capable of working at faster speeds. Increased integration creates better performance. By using brainwave entrainment technologies, you can increase your hemispheric synchronization. By simply listening to any BMV CD, your brain naturally synchronizes to balance hemispheric activity and adjusts brainwave activity to match the embedded brainwave carrier frequencies. This audio-induced hemispheric coherence produces an optimal state of holistic whole-brain synergy.

For a more in-depth explanation of the powerful audio neuro-technologies, you can click HERE to read the BMV Technology Page.

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This is the ultimate Extra-Strength awareness aid for people who want brainwave stimulation effects without the background sounds of oceans or someone speaking. All that is present on these audio tracks are the soothing vibrations of the brainwave entrainment tones themselves. This is a perceptual tool that needs to be Experienced to be Believed.

This series is best used as a springboard for deep meditation, trancework, reverie, problem solving, brainstorming, creative visualization and a host of other benefits including heightened awareness and expanded states of consciousness. The more you use the brainwave sessions on this CD, the easier it becomes to consciously enter these brainwave states at will.

This journey can take you deep into your own viable, nonphysical or non-ordinary reality. With time and practice, you can effortlessly induce these mindstates. In the meanwhile, you can be assured that your brainwaves will be tuned to the correct frequency ranges to maximize your results. Like the magical beat of a shaman's drum, the embedded brainwave entrainment frequencies slow down your brainwaves to induce deeply expanded states of consciousness conducive for all forms of meditation and trance work.

This series has five brainwave sessions that are designed to looped on repeat mode to experience an extended brainwave entrainment session, TONES only, for that specific brainwave range. Obviously you can also can loop/repeat the entire series for a progressive brainwave relaxation session.



Brainwave Mind Voyages (Series VI) - The Tones (flac  383mb)

01 The ALPHA Tones
02 The THETA Tones
03 The HYPNO Tones
04 The DELTA Tones
05 The AWAKENED MIND

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Previously

Brainwave Mind Voyages (Series I) (flac  248mb)
Brainwave Mind Voyages (Series II) (flac  342mb)
Brainwave Mind Voyages (Series III) (flac  258mb)
Brainwave Mind Voyages (Series IV) (flac  263mb)
Brainwave Mind Voyages (Series V) (flac  265mb)

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Jan 29, 2017

Sundaze 1705

Hello,

Today's artist is a British electronic music artist, from Walsall, who currently operates out of Malden, Massachusetts. When he is not busy running the Type record label, and writing for Boomkat, he produces electronic music encompassing a variety of styles and moods. His earlier music combines constructed beats, smart melodies and brittle electronica, which is supplemented by guitar and other instrumentation in later recordings. An obsession with horror soundtracks, has influenced him to produce more atmospheric soundscapes encompassing folk, drone, and psychedelia........N'Joy

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Xela is the brainchild of Manchester, England-based multi-instrumentalist/producer John Twells, the moniker under which he records atmospheric, eclectic, and often dark electronic music. Twells' father was a guitarist and he developed a love of music early on, playing flute and saxophone as a child and moving on to guitar in his teens. After playing in various bands, Twells began making music on his own, finding more inspiration in electronic music than the metal, punk, and indie influences of his previous work. Twells sent out demos of his work, which caught the ear of Metamatics' Lee Norris, who asked him to contribute a track to a compilation and released Xela's 2003 debut mini-album, For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights, on the Neo Ouija label. Around that time, Twells began collaborating with Gabriel Morley, aka Logreybeam, as the duo Yasume. Tangled Wool, a collection of love songs that also reintroduced guitars into Twells' music, was released on City Centre Offices in 2004.

Two years later, The Dead Sea, a concept album about a ship attacked by zombies, arrived on Twells' own Type label (which also issued releases by Logreybeam and Khonnor). Influenced by prog, sea shanties, Italian horror soundtracks, and noise, the album also featured beautifully grim visuals by artist Matthew Woodson. That year, Yasume's homage to David Lynch and Angelo Badalamenti's influence on Twells and Morley, Where We're from the Birds Sing a Pretty Song, was also released. For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights was reissued by Type in 2007, and In Bocca al Lupo, which was originally composed for a gallery installation revolving around the concept of fear, arrived in 2008. During that time, Twells also released many limited-edition projects on imprints including Digitalis, SMTG, and Static Caravan.


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John Twells' first album as Xela, 2003's he wrote the album in-between working at a car-parts shop selling car audio and busying himself with an art degree at University, which of course gave him the time to rush home whenever he could and work on music, and had the added bonus of providing him with large speaker systems to test out prospective tracks. The record was created in response to a two key things – a sense of alienation in the small ex-industrial town of Walsall, and most importantly to the electronic music he had just begun to hear. John had been brought up on a steady diet of indie, punk and metal and was exposed to electronic music fairly late, but as soon as he heard his first washes of analogue synthesizer he knew his life would change. It quickly led him to put down the guitars and save his pennies for cheap electronic equipment – synths, drum machines and tape recorders, and before long he was crafting home-made electronic symphonies. These early demos caught the attention of Lee Norris (Metamatics) who ran the Neo Ouija label, Lee used one of the tracks on a compilation he was compiling at the time, and encouraged John to put together a full length record. The result of this would become ‘For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights’ which harnessed

Johns love for glacial electronics, the ultra-minimal sound of Mille Plateaux and 12k, hip hop and of course indie rock, melting them all down into a vague narrative across the course of the record.However, the flair for intricately detailed tracks that somehow never feel overwrought is all Twells, and that, along with his ways with mood and melody (particularly on "Afraid of Monsters," "Bobble Hats in Summer," and "Last Breath"), is what makes For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights unique. "Japanese Whispers" is a standout example of his layered, intertwining approach, while "Inbetween Two Rooms" and "Impulsive Behaviour" have the shimmering, slightly tense feeling that he developed in his later music. Interestingly, tracks like "An Abandoned Robot" and "The Long Walk Home at Midnight" come closer to the dark atmosphere of later works such as The Dead Sea than the bittersweet folktronica of Xela's second album, Tangled Wool. Even though Xela's music became more strikingly original once he reincorporated his love of rock and heavy sounds -- alternative rock and heavy metal were Twells' favorite styles until he discovered and then immersed himself in electronic music -- the loveliness of, and skill behind, For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights is undeniable. Twells' own label, Type, reissued the album in 2007 with two bonus tracks, "A Glance" and "Danse Macabre."



Xela - For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights  (flac  326mb)

01 Afraid Of Monsters 5:03
02 Under The Glow Of Streetlights 4:24
03 Japanese Whispers 6:10
04 Inbetween Two Rooms 4:47
05 Impulsive Behaviour 4:25
06 An Abandoned Robot 5:52
07 The Long Walk Home At Midnight 5:21
08 Bobble Hats In Summer 6:26
09 Digital Winter 2:16
10 Last Breath 6:13
Bonus
11 A Glance 4:56
12 Danse Macabre 4:52

Xela - For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights    (ogg  145mb)

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Minus the baggage of realizing that nothing's incredibly distinct about it, John Twells' second Xela album is nonetheless a cuddly, sunlit listen. Filled with nostalgic/half-remembered tints that have nearly become as much of a cottage industry as retro garage rock bands; its autumnal glow comes across as homespun, less reliant on trickery than other releases that fill this niche. The folksiness of Twells' tremulous acoustic guitar, in fact, should please those who much prefer melodies to processing. This should appeal to followers of the Temporary Residence label as much as those who are now having trouble staying on top of City Centre Offices' suddenly rapid release schedule.



Xela - Tangled Wool  (flac  246mb)

01 Softness Of Senses 4:40
02 Smiles And Bridges 4:41
03 You Are In The Stars 5:04
04 Drawing Pictures Of Girls 4:49
05 Through Crimson Clouds 5:26
06 Quiet Night 5:14
07 So No Goodbyes 5:03
08 Her Eyes Sparkled And She Walked Away 5:55

Xela - Tangled Wool    (ogg 93mb)

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Inspired by sources as varied as Goblin's scores for Dario Argento's gory classics to Wolf Eyes' unearthly electronic noise, Xela's The Dead Sea is a concept album about a sea voyage overtaken by zombies. Stories like this don't usually end well, and neither does this one; doom is telegraphed with every track, from "The Gate" -- which begins the album with droning strings that give off vibrations of dread like heat shimmer -- to the chilling finale, "Briefly Seen." Often, the album feels like a field recording of rusty chains, ill winds, and lost souls. Though The Dead Sea is far darker than Tangled Wool or For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights, it shares Xela's attention to mood and sonic detail, teeming with writhing textures and percussion and haunting melodies that occasionally bob to the surface. Decaying sea shanties like "Creeping Flesh" and "A Floating Procession" would almost be jaunty, were it not for the unsettlingly deep basslines that shadow them. Even the prettiest tracks, such as the acoustic guitar-based "Linseed" and "Drunk on Salt Water," boast enough creepy, half-heard moments that they don't offer respite from the itchy, insectoid noise of "Wet Bones" and "Sinking Cadavers"' icy electronics, both of which evoke the zombies' slow but inevitable approach. It all culminates on the outstanding "Humid at Dusk," an eerie folk-noise battle between maritime acoustics and undead electronics. Ultimately, The Dead Sea is more spooky than terrifying; after all the buildup, some more intense scares would've been satisfying. Still, the album does a remarkably good job of conjuring up extremely vivid, ghastly images (like the one on its brilliant album artwork) and making you look around every once in a while to make sure everything is all right. Bleak, beautiful, and fascinating, this is Xela's most ambitious and accomplished work yet.



Xela - The Dead Sea  (flac  342mb)

01 The Gate 4:52
02 Linseed 4:25
03 Drunk On Salt Water 4:22
04 Wet Bones 4:44
05 Creeping Flesh 2:33
06 Savage Ritual  4:14
07 A Floating Procession 4:45
08 Sinking Cadavers 1:02
09 Humid At Dusk 5:00
10 Watching A Light In The Distance 2:08
11 Briefly Seen 5:16
12 Never Going Home 2:22
bonus
13 Halloween 7:44
14 Suspiria 5:36

Xela - The Dead Sea   (ogg  108mb)

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"In bocca al lupo" ("in the wolf's mouth") is a traditional Italian phrase wishing someone luck in attempting a difficult undertaking or in the face of dire circumstances. It's also a fitting title for this album, which is among Xela's (aka John Twells) most ambitious, abstract, and yes, difficult music. In Bocca al Lupo is even darker and more conceptual than 2006's magnificent zombies-at-sea epic The Dead Sea: where that album was inspired by Italian horror movie soundtracks, In Bocca al Lupo began as part of an art installation about fear, and its four lengthy pieces aren't so much scary music as expressions of creeping dread and outbursts of terror. The melodies of his earlier Type albums have bled away, leaving the harsh yet strangely lulling electronic noise that gnawed away at the edges of The Dead Sea as the heart of the music. Heavy drones and tolling church bells add chilly depth and a feeling somewhere between eerie and sacred, while the writhing layers of noise have more in common with Xela's limited-release works like Heirs of the Fire than For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights or even The Dead Sea (both of which could practically be pop albums in comparison). Like The Dead Sea, however In Bocca al Lupo is structured masterfully, drawing listeners in with the relatively gentle "Ut Nos Vivicaret," which rolls in and out as imperceptibly as fog. Each subsequent track gets deeper and denser, shifting from cavernous to suffocating: "In Deo Salutari"'s pretty bells and chimes are gradually overtaken and rotted by distortion, which leads into "In Misericordia"'s deep, uneasy drones. It culminates with "Beatae Immortalitatis," the album's 20-minute finale and its only truly loud track. Heavy Winged drummer Jed Bindeman brings In Bocca al Lupo to a pounding, howling peak that closes with a woman screaming in the distance. While it's not as immediate as Twells' previous Type output, the album's enveloping dread is more than just an exercise: it's an impressive demonstration of just how committed Twells is to pushing the boundaries of Xela's music.



Xela - In Bocca Al Lupo, Never Better  (flac  494mb)

01 Ut Nos Vivicaret 12:45
02 In Deo Salutari Meo 13:52
03 In Misericordia 14:34
04 Beatae Immortalitatis 20:37
Never Better
05 Lost And Loved 20:41
06 Loved And Lost 21:16

Xela - In Bocca Al Lupo, Never Better    (ogg  186mb)

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Jan 28, 2017

RhoDeo 1704 Grooves

Hello, it's the Chinese New Year, the year of the rooster and i for one wish them all the best, however there's this very cocky atomic rooster in the White House, hmm meanwhile Silicon Valley is sitting pretty as a prime retalliatory target on the Westcoast...That is if the aliens let us throw nukes at all...



Today's artist is an American soul and jazz poet, musician, and author, known primarily for his work as a spoken-word performer in the 1970s and 1980s. His collaborative efforts with musician Brian Jackson featured a musical fusion of jazz, blues, and soul, as well as lyrical content concerning social and political issues of the time, delivered in both rapping and melismatic vocal styles. He received post mortem a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012.  ..... N'joy

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One of the most important progenitors of rap music, Gil Scott-Heron's aggressive, no-nonsense street poetry inspired a legion of intelligent rappers while his engaging songwriting skills placed him square in the R&B charts later in his career, backed by increasingly contemporary production courtesy of Malcolm Cecil and Nile Rodgers (of Chic). Born in Chicago but transplanted to Tennessee for his early years, Scott-Heron spent most of his high-school years in the Bronx, where he learned firsthand many of the experiences that later made up his songwriting material. He had begun writing before reaching his teenage years, however, and completed his first volume of poetry at the age of 13. Though he attended college in Pennsylvania, he dropped out after one year to concentrate on his writing career and earned plaudits for his novel, The Vulture.

Encouraged at the end of the '60s to begin recording by legendary jazz producer Bob Thiele -- who had worked with every major jazz great from Louis Armstrong to John Coltrane -- Scott-Heron released his 1970 debut, Small Talk at 125th and Lenox, inspired by a volume of poetry of the same name. With Thiele's Flying Dutchman Records until the mid-'70s, he signed to Arista soon after and found success on the R&B charts. Though his jazz-based work of the early '70s was tempered by a slicker disco-inspired production, Scott-Heron's message was as clear as ever on the Top 30 single "Johannesburg" and the number 15 hit "Angel Dust." Silent for almost a decade, after the release of his 1984 single "Re-Ron," the proto-rapper returned to recording in the mid-'90s with a message for the gangsta rappers who had come in his wake; Scott-Heron's 1994 album Spirits began with "Message to the Messengers," pointed squarely at the rappers whose influence -- positive or negative -- meant much to the children of the 1990s.

In a touching bit of irony that he himself was quick to joke about, Gil Scott-Heron was born on April Fool's Day 1949 in Chicago, the son of a Jamaican professional soccer player (who spent time playing for Glasgow Celtic) and a college-graduate mother who worked as a librarian. His parents divorced early in his life, and Scott-Heron was sent to live with his grandmother in Lincoln, TN. Learning musical and literary instruction from her, Scott-Heron also learned about prejudice firsthand, as he was one of three children picked to integrate an elementary school in nearby Jackson. The abuse proved too much to bear, however, and the eighth-grader was sent to New York to live with his mother, first in the Bronx and later in the Hispanic neighborhood of Chelsea.

Though Scott-Heron's experiences in Tennessee must have been difficult, they proved to be the seed of his writing career, as his first volume of poetry was written around that time. His education in the New York City school system also proved beneficial, introducing the youth to the work of Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes as well as LeRoi Jones. After publishing a novel called The Vulture in 1968, Scott-Heron applied to Pennsylvania's Lincoln University. Though he spent less than one year there, it was enough time to meet Brian Jackson, a similarly minded musician who would later become a crucial collaborator and integral part of Scott-Heron's band.

Given a bit of exposure -- mostly in magazines like Essence, which called The Vulture "a strong start for a writer with important things to say" -- Scott-Heron met up with Bob Thiele and was encouraged to begin a music career, reading selections from his book of poetry Small Talk at 125th & Lennox while Thiele recorded a collective of jazz and funk musicians, including bassist Ron Carter, drummer Bernard "Pretty" Purdie, Hubert Laws on flute and alto saxophone, and percussionists Eddie Knowles and Charlie Saunders; Scott-Heron also recruited Jackson to play on the record as pianist. Most important on the album was "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised," an aggressive polemic against the major media and white America's ignorance of increasingly deteriorating conditions in the inner cities. Scott-Heron's second LP, 1971's Pieces of a Man, expanded his range, featuring songs such as the title track and "Lady Day and John Coltrane," which offered a more straight-ahead approach to song structure (if not content).

The following year's Free Will was his last for Flying Dutchman, however; after a dispute with the label, Scott-Heron recorded Winter in America for Strata East, then moved to Arista Records in 1975. As the first artist signed to Clive Davis' new label, much was riding on Scott-Heron to deliver first-rate material with a chance at the charts. Thanks to Arista's more focused push on the charts, Scott-Heron's "Johannesburg" reached number 29 on the R&B charts in 1975. Important to Scott-Heron's success on his first two albums for Arista (First Minute of a New Day and From South Africa to South Carolina) was the influence of keyboardist and collaborator Jackson, co-billed on both LPs and the de facto leader of Scott-Heron's Midnight Band.

Jackson left by 1978, though, leaving the musical direction of Scott-Heron's career in the capable hands of producer Malcolm Cecil, a veteran producer who had midwifed the funkier direction of the Isley Brothers and Stevie Wonder earlier in the decade. The first single recorded with Cecil, "The Bottle," became Scott-Heron's biggest hit yet, peaking at number 15 on the R&B charts, though he still made no waves on the pop charts. Producer Nile Rodgers of Chic also helped on production during the 1980s, when Scott-Heron's political attack grew even more fervent with a new target, President Ronald Reagan. (Several singles, including the R&B hits "B Movie" and "Re-Ron," were specifically directed at the President's conservative policies.) By 1985, however, Scott-Heron was dropped by Arista, just after the release of The Best of Gil Scott-Heron. Though he continued to tour around the world, Scott-Heron chose to discontinue recording. He did return, however, in 1993 with a contract for TVT Records and the album Spirits.

For well over a decade, Scott-Heron was mostly inactive, held back by a series of drug possession charges. He began performing semi-regularly in 2007, and one year later, announced that he was HIV-positive. He recorded an album, I'm New Here, released on XL in 2010. In February of 2011, Scott-Heron and Jamie xx (Jamie Smith of xx) issued a remixed version of the album, entitled We're New Here, also issued on XL. Scott-Heron died on the afternoon of May 27, 2011, at St. Luke's Hospital, New York City, after becoming ill upon returning from a European trip, an airline cabin is always a cocktail of virusses and bacteria which proved to be too much for the weakened by HIV elderly man.

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Gil Scott-Heron's 1971 album Pieces of a Man set a standard for vocal artistry and political awareness that few musicians will ever match. His unique proto-rap vocal style influenced a generation of hip-hop artists, and nowhere is his style more powerful than on the classic "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised." Even though the media -- the very entity attacked in this song -- has used, reused, and recontextualized the song and its title so many times, the message is so strong that it has become almost impossible to co-opt. Musically, the track created a formula that modern hip-hop would follow for years to come: bare-bones arrangements featuring pounding basslines and stripped-down drumbeats. Although the song features plenty of outdated references to everything from Spiro Agnew and Jim Webb to The Beverly Hillbillies, the force of Scott-Heron's well-directed anger makes the song timeless. More than just a spoken word poet, Scott-Heron was also a uniquely gifted vocalist. On tracks like the reflective "I Think I'll Call It Morning" and the title track, Scott-Heron's voice is complemented perfectly by the soulful keyboards of Brian Jackson. On "Lady Day and John Coltrane," he not only celebrates jazz legends of the past in his words but in his vocal performance, one that is filled with enough soul and innovation to make Coltrane and Billie Holiday nod their heads in approval. More than three decades after its release, Pieces of a Man is just as -- if not more -- powerful and influential today as it was the day it was released.



Gil Scott-Heron - Pieces Of A Man    (flac  257mb)

01 The Revolution Will Not Be Televised 3:06
02 Save The Children 4:26
03 Lady Day And John Coltrane 3:35
04 Home Is Where The Hatred Is 3:20
05 When You Are Who You Are 3:21
06 I Think I'll Call It Morning 3:30
07 Pieces Of A Man 4:52
08 A Sign Of The Ages 4:01
09 Or Down You Fall 3:12
10 The Needle's Eye 4:49
11 The Prisoner 9:25

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Gil Scott-Heron's third album is split down the middle, the first side being a purely musical experience with a full band (including flutist Hubert Laws and drummer Pretty Purdie), the second functioning more as a live rap session with collaborator Brian Jackson on flute and a few friends on percussion. For side one, although he's overly tentative on the ballad "The Middle of Your Day," Scott-Heron excels on the title track and the third song, "The Get Out of the Ghetto Blues," one of his best, best-known performances. The second side is more of an impromptu performance, with Scott-Heron often explaining his tracks by way of introduction ("No Knock" referred to a new police policy whereby knocking was no longer required before entering a house, "And Then He Wrote Meditations" being Scott-Heron's tribute to John Coltrane). His first exploration of pure music-making, Free Will functions as one of Scott-Heron's most visceral performance, displaying a maturing artist who still draws on the raw feeling of his youth.



Gil Scott-Heron - Free Will   (flac  193mb)

01 Free Will 3:40
02 The Middle Of Your Day 4:28
03 The Get Out Of The Ghetto Blues 5:08
04 Speed Kills 3:15
05 Did You Hear What They Said ? 3:28
06 The King Alfred Plan 2:54
07 No Knock 2:11
08 Wiggy 1:36
09 Ain't No New Thing 4:32
10 Billy Green Is Dead 1:31
11 Sex Education: Ghetto Style 0:54
12 ... And Then He Wrote Meditations 3:16

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Gil Scott-Heron was at his most righteous and provocative on this album. The title cut was a moving, angry summation of the social injustices Scott-Heron felt had led the nation to a particularly dangerous period, while "The Bottle" was a great treatise on the dangers of alcohol abuse. He also offered his thoughts on Nixon's legacy with "The H2O Gate Blues," a classic oral narrative. Brian Jackson's capable keyboard, acoustic piano and arranging talents helped make this a first-rate release, one of several the duo issued during the 1970s.



Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson - Winter in America  (flac 235mb)

01 Peace Go With You, My Brother (As-Salaam-Alaikum) 5:30
02 Rivers Of My Fathers 8:29
03 A Very Precious Time 5:13
04 Back Home 2:50
05 The Bottle 5:14
06 Song For Bobby Smith 4:42
07 Your Daddy Loves You 2:57
08 H2O Gate Blues 8:23
09 Peace Go With You Brother (Wa-Alaikum-Salaam) 1:11

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The collaboration between Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson was now a formal one, as they were issuing albums as a team. This was their second duo project to make the pop charts, and it included anti-nuclear and anti-apartheid themes, plus less political, more autobiographical/reflective material like "Summer of '42," "Beginnings (The First Minute of a New Day)," and "Fell Together." Scott-Heron was now a campus and movement hero, and Jackson's production and arranging savvy helped make his albums as arresting musically as they were lyrically.



Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson - From South Africa To South Carolina   (flac 449mb)

01 Johannesburg 4:52
02 A Toast To The People 5:47
03 The Summer Of '42 4:41
04 Beginnings (The First Minute Of A New Day) 6:23
05 South Carolina (Barnwell) 3:46
06 Essex 9:17
07 Fell Together 4:30
08 A Lovely Day 3:29
Bonus
09 South Carolina (Barnwell) (Live) 6:29
10 Save The Children (Live) 4:23
11 Johannesburg (Live) 11:14
12 Let Me See Your I.D. 7:30

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Jan 27, 2017

RhoDeo 1704 Re-Ups 84

Hello,

These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a small number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here  remember to request from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned), and please check the previous update request if it's less then a year old i won't re-up.

Looka here another batch of 21 re-ups, requests fullfilled up to January 25th. There's much more to be had here. My tip here randomly pick an archive date and move up or down a few pages to older or newer posts, browse what you get there and maybe you'll find something of your liking or it may triggers a memory of what you'd really want and then do a search  ...N' Joy

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2x World NOW in Flac (Omnia - Pagan Folk, VA - Cryptichon I)

2x Aetix NOW in Flac (VA - New Wave Club Class-X X-1, VA - New Wave Club Class-X X-2)

2x Aetix NOW in Flac (VA - New Wave Club Class-X Y-1, VA - New Wave Club Class-X Y-2)


4x Aetix NOW In Flac (Cocteau Twins - Garlands, Cocteau Twins - Head Over Heels, Cocteau Twins - BBC Sessions 1,2 )


4x Aetix Back in Flac (Cocteau Twins - Lullabies to Violaine I, II, III, IV)


3x Sundaze Back in Flac (Tarwater – 11|6 12|10, Tarwater – Silur, Tarwater - Rabbit Moon Revisited)


4x Roots Back in Flac (Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.1-1, Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.1-2, Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.2-1, Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.2-2)


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Jan 25, 2017

RhoDeo 1704 Aetix

Hello, so after delivering the pacific countries into the hands of China by scrapping a treaty, Trump declared war on the Sioux indians (worthy of the vain coward he is) but hey they can have the spilled oil, what is truly worrisome is he sees millions of supporters that aren't there and expects everyone to agree, reminds me of a fairytale about the wonderful new clothes of the king.....


Today's artists influenced future hardcore punk bands with their fast-paced, energetic playing style and attitude. Along with the Sex Pistols and the Clash, they helped to spearhead the punk movement in the United Kingdom. They are sometimes referred to as British punk's "band of firsts," having made accomplishments mentioned previously, as well as other "firsts" like the first punk band to break up and come back........N'Joy

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With punk's history having entered a new millennium, the impact of the band initially judged "the least likely to" seems to grow ever more each day. The Ramones hold deserved pride of place for kick-starting the whole thing, while the Sex Pistols -- and to a lesser extent, the Clash -- helped take it to an even more notorious level, serving as role models for many young bands to this day. But arguably just as important and memorable were the Damned, London contemporaries of the Pistols and Clash that made their own mark from the start. Eschewing political posing, ill-fitting outside rhetoric, and simply doing the same thing over and over again, the group -- which lacked anything like a stable lineup -- took punk's simplicity and promise as a starting point and ran with it. The end result, at the group's finest: a series of inspired, ambitious albums and amazing live shows combining full-on rock energy, a stylish sense of performance, and humorous deadpan cool. Not necessarily what anyone would have thought when Ray Burns and Chris Millar met in 1974, when both ended up working backstage at the Croydon Fairfield Hall.

Burns and Millar -- more famously known in later years as guitarist/singer Captain Sensible and manic drummer Rat Scabies -- kept in touch as both struggled in the stultifying mid-'70s London scene. Things picked up when Scabies talked his way into a rehearsal with London S.S., the shifting lineup ground zero of U.K. punk that nearly everybody seemed to belong to at one point or another. There he met guitarist Brian James, while in a separate venture overseen by Malcolm McLaren, casting about for his own particular group to oversee, Scabies first met theatrical singer Dave Vanian, still working through his New York Dolls/Alice Cooper obsession. Vanian's own history allegedly included singing "I Love the Dead" and "Dead Babies" while working as a gravedigger, but whatever the background, he proved to be a perfect frontman. Scabies put Sensible in touch with Vanian and James and the Damned were born, with Sensible switching over to bass while James handled guitar and songwriting.

Though the Sex Pistols became the most publicized of all the original London punk groups, forming and playing before everyone else, the Damned actually ended up scoring most of the firsts on its own, notably the first U.K. punk single -- "New Rose" -- in 1976 and the first album, Damned Damned Damned, the following year. Produced by Nick Lowe, both were clipped, direct explosions of sheer energy, sometimes rude but never less than entertaining. The group ended up sacked from the Pistols' cancellation-plagued full U.K. tour after only one show, but rebounded with a opening slot on the final T. Rex tour, while further tweaking everyone else's noses by being the first U.K. act to take punk back to America via a New York jaunt. Things started to get fairly shaky after that, however, with Lu Edmonds drafted in on second guitar and plans for the group's second album, Music for Pleasure, not succeeding as hoped for. The members wanted legendary rock burnout Syd Barrett to produce, but had to settle for his Pink Floyd bandmate Nick Mason. The indifferent results and other pressures convinced Scabies to call it a day, and while future Culture Club drummer Jon Moss was drafted in to cover, the group wrapped it up in early 1978.

Or so it seemed; after various go-nowhere ventures (Sensible tried the retro-psych King, Vanian temporarily joined glam-too-late oddballs the Doctors of Madness), all the original members save James realized they still enjoyed working together. Settling the legal rights to the name after some shows incognito in late 1978, the group, now with Sensible playing lead guitar (and also the first U.K. punk band to reunite), embarked on its most successful all-around period. With a series of bassists -- first ex-Saints member Algy Ward, then Eddie & the Hot Rods refugee Paul Gray and finally Bryn Merrick -- the Damned proceeded to make a run of stone-cold classic albums and singles. There'd be plenty of low points amidst the highs, to be sure, but it's hard to argue with the results. Vanian's smart crooning and spooky theatricality ended up more or less founding goth rock inadvertently (with nearly all his clones forgetting what he always kept around -- an open sense of humor). Sensible, meanwhile, turned out to be an even better guitarist than James, a master of tight riffs and instantly memorable melodies and, when needed, a darn good keyboardist, while Scabies' ghost-of-Keith Moon drumming was some of the most entertaining yet technically sharp work on that front in years.

Machine Gun Etiquette The one-two punch of Machine Gun Etiquette, the 1979 reunion record, and the following year's The Black Album demonstrated the band's staying power well, packed with such legendary singles as the intentionally ridiculous "Love Song," the anthemic "Smash It Up," and "Wait for the Blackout" and the catchy Satanism (if you will) of "I Just Can't Be Happy Today." On the live front, the Damned were unstoppable, riding out punk's supposed death with a series of fiery performances laden with both great playing and notable antics, from Sensible's penchant for clothes-shedding to Vanian's eye for horror style and performance. Released in 1982, Strawberries found the Damned creating another generally fine release, but to less public acclaim than Sensible's solo work, the guitarist having surprisingly found himself a number one star with a version of "Happy Talk" from South Pacific. While the dual career lasted for a year or two more, the Damned found themselves starting to fracture again with little more than a hardcore fan base supporting the group work -- Sensible finally left in mid-1984 after disputes over band support staff hirings and firings. Second guitarist Roman Jugg, having joined some time previously, stepped to the lead and the band continued on.

Phantasmagoria To everyone's surprise, not only did the Damned bounce back, they did so in a very public way -- first by ending up on a major label, MCA, who issued Phantasmagoria in 1985, then scoring a massive U.K. hit via a cover of "Eloise," a melodramatic '60s smash for Barry Ryan. It was vindication on a commercial level a decade after having first started, but the Anything album in 1986, flashes of inspiration aside, felt far more anonymous in comparison, the band's worst since Music for Pleasure.

After a full career retrospective release, The Light at the End of the Tunnel, the band undertook a variety of farewell tours, including dates with both Sensible and James joining the then-current quartet. The end of 1989 brought a final We Really Must Be Going tour in the U.K., featuring the original quartet in one last bow, which would seem to have been the end to things. Anything but. The I Didn't Say It tour arrived in 1991, with Paul Gray rejoining the band to play along with the quartet. It was the first in a series of dates and shows throughout the '90s which essentially confirmed the group as a nostalgia act, concentrating on the early part of its career for audiences often too young to have even heard about them the first time around. It was a good nostalgia act, though, with performances regularly showing the old fire (and Sensible his legendary stage presence, often finishing shows nude). After some 1992 shows, the Damned disappeared again for a while -- but when December 1993 brought some more dates, an almost all-new band was the result. Only Scabies and Vanian remained, much like the late '80s lineup; their cohorts were guitarists Kris Dollimore and Alan Lee Shaw and bassist Moose.

This quintet toured and performed in Japan and Europe for about two years, also recording demos here and there that Vanian claimed he believed were for a projected future album with both Sensible and James contributing. Whatever the story, nothing more might have happened if Scabies hadn't decided to work out a formal release of those demos as Not of This Earth, first appearing in Japan in late November 1995. Vanian, having reestablished contact with Sensible during the former's touring work with his Phantom Chords band, responded by breaking with Scabies, reuniting fully with Sensible and recruiting a new group to take over the identity of the Damned. Initially this consisted of Gray once again, plus drummer Garrie Dreadful and keyboardist Monty. However, Gray was replaced later in 1996 following an on-stage tantrum by, in a totally new twist, punk veteran Patricia Morrison, known for her work in the Gun Club and the Sisters of Mercy among many other bands. Scabies reacted to all this with threats of lawsuits and vituperative public comments, but after all was said and done, Vanian, Sensible, and company maintained the rights to the name, occasional billing as "ex-members of the Damned" aside, done to avoid further trouble.

Since then, this latest version of the Damned has toured on a fairly regular basis, though this time with instability in the drumming department (Dreadful left at the end of 1998, first replaced by Spike, then later in 1999 by Pinch). While Vanian continued to pursue work with the Phantom Chords, for the first time in years, the Damned started to become a true outfit once again, the lineup gelling and holding together enough to warrant further attention. The capper was a record contract in 2000 with Nitro Records, the label founded and run by longtime Damned fanatic Dexter Holland, singer with the Offspring (who covered "Smash It Up" for the Batman Forever soundtrack in the mid-'90s). In a fun personal note, meanwhile, Morrison and Vanian married, perhaps making them the ultimate punk/goth couple of all time. Grave Disorder By 2001, the Vanian/Sensible-led Damned looked to be in fine shape, releasing the album Grave Disorder on Nitro and touring to general acclaim. Knowing the fractured history of the band -- captured in the literally endless series of releases, authorized and otherwise, from all periods of its career, live, studio, compilations, and more -- only a foolish person would claim things would stay on an even keel for the future.

Permanently losing Scabies would seem to have been a killer blow on first blush, but the group has soldiered on regardless, a welcome influence from the past as well as a group of fine entertainers for the present. The year 2005 found both eras of the band being represented. While the new lineup was touring and working on a new album, the original lineup was honored by the three-disc box set Play It at Your Sister, which was released on the Sanctuary label. The limited-edition set covered the years 1976-1977, featuring all the tracks from the first two albums along with John Peel sessions and live material. It soon came time for the new lineup to issue its own album, which arrived in 2008 in the form of a slick, pop-influenced record titled So, Who's Paranoid? Extensive touring ensued, and in early 2015, with Sensible present, a documentary titled The Damned: Don't You Wish That You Were Dead premiered at the SXSW Film Festival. Merrick, who had been performing in a Ramones tribute band, died later that year of cancer.

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Recuperating a bit from The Black Album's uneven impact while still aiming to try whatever they want in studio, here the same four members, along with soon-to-be regular Roman Jugg on various keyboard parts, come up with their strongest album since Machine Gun Etiquette. By turns sprightly and cheerful, dark and dramatic, energetic and snarling, or all that and more at once, Strawberries defies usual expectations to be yet another good rock album from the band, resisting easy attempts to categorize it. Older punk fans would likely appreciate the album's initial blast of "Ignite," a driving thrasher with a fine chorus and some hilarious vamping in the end from Vanian. Immediately following is the superior "Generals," which beautifully combines piano and a crisp arrangement with Vanian's powerfully smooth mode. From there, it's almost a case of strength-to-strength as the album continues: the brass-driven "Stranger on the Town," sassy and sharp; the giddy keyboards and crunch of "Dozen Girls"; the gentler psych-pop experiments of "Gun Fury" and "The Pleasure and the Pain"; the Reagan-baiting "Bad Time for Bonzo"; and the bright beauty of "Under the Floor Again," at once mysterious and gorgeous with a particularly winning instrumental break merging some of Vanian's most positive lyrics. Captain Sensible gets two fun moments for himself in the ruminative "Life Goes On" and the album-closing fun goof, "Don't Bother Me." Meanwhile, at the album's center is the darkest, most haunting thing the band ever recorded, "The Dog." It's an astonishingly effective chiller based on the character of Claudia from Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire. Cleopatra's welcome 1993 re-release added five bonus tracks, including the Captain's brief piano piece "Torture Me," which tackles the same subject as the Smiths' "Meat Is Murder" but with arguably less hectoring and more affecting results. The 2005 Deluxe Edition includes three more extra cuts, including "Mine's a Large One Landlord," "Rat vs the Omni" and "I Think I'm Wonderful."]



The Damned - Strawberries (flac  467mb)

01 Ignite 4:52
02 Generals 3:23
03 Stranger On The Town 5:14
04 Dozen Girls 4:33
05The Dog 7:20
06 Gun Fury (Of Riot Forces) 2:56
07 Pleasure And The Pain 3:52
08 The Missing Link 0:30
09 Life Goes On 4:03
10 Bad Time For Bonzo 3:47
11 Under The Floor Again 5:03
12 Don't Bother Me 2:11
Bonus
13 Lovely Money (Extended) 6:56
14 I Think I'm Wonderful 2:55
15 Take That 2:47
16 Mine's A Large One Landlord 1:15
17 Torture Me 1:24
18 Disguise 3:28
19 Rat Vs The Omni 0:45
20 Citadel Zombies 1:57
21 Bimbo Jingle 0:08

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By the time the Damned found themselves on a major label after nine years of ups, downs, and all-arounds, a big change had taken place: Captain Sensible, with both his own solo successes and other pressures coming to bear, decided to depart. Keyboardist Roman Jugg took over the guitar, while Bryn Merrick remained on bass and Vanian and Scabies continued doing their thing. The first fruit of this new Damned, Phantasmagoria, doesn't match up to the excellent variety and performance level on Strawberries, but still has a lot to show while at the same time exploring new territory for the group. The cover and artwork seem to ally the Damned even more closely with goth rock than before, but Vanian thankfully has never seen fit to simply ape those clichés, steering his own powerful path. Similarly, the music can be moody but never without its own distinct energy and fire -- more a Cramps sense (if not sound) of loving the dark than anything, but with a clean, modern sheen and just enough Hammer horror. "Street of Dreams" makes for a powerful, anthemic opener, with some fine Scabies drumming. "Is It a Dream," the one song with a Sensible co-writing credit, is yet another fantastic Vanian vocal showcase in a career of many. The really killer tracks include "Shadow of Love," a semi-Morricone-style mood-out quick shuffle with haunting guitar from Jugg, and "Grimly Fiendish," a funny bit of spooky psychedelia not all that far off from where the Dukes of Stratosphear would end up a couple of years later. Phantasmagoria concludes with the surging instrumental "Trojans," a strong number that showed the Damned had lots of life in them yet.



The Damned - Phantasmagoria (flac 371mb)

01 Street Of Dreams 5:39
02 Shadow Of Love 3:52
03 There'll Come A Day 4:15
04 Sanctum Sanctorum 6:28
05 Is It A Dream 3:28
06 Grimly Fiendish 3:50
07 Edward The Bear 3:37
08 The Eighth Day 3:47
09 Trojans 4:53
Bonus
10 Grimly Fiendish (Bad Trip) 5:12
11 The Shadow Of Love (Ten Inches Of Hell Mix) 6:46
12 Is It A Dream (Wild West Express Mix Live) 6:45

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The Damned - Phantasmagoria bonus (flac  385mb)

01 Grimly Fiendish (Spic N Span Mix) 5:23
02 Edward The Bear 3:56
03 The Shadow Of Love (Pressure Mix) 5:27
04 Nightshift 2:28
05 Let There Be Rats 2:12
06 Wiped Out 1:38
07 Would You 2:49
08 Is It A Dream (Wild West End Mix) 8:13
09 Street Of Dreams (Live) 5:05
10 Curtain Call (Live) 4:30
11 Pretty Vacant (Live) 2:05
12 Wild Thing (Live) 2:18
13 Shadow Of Love (Radio One Session 20/5/85) 4:09
14 Is It A Dream (Radio One Session 20/5/85) 3:40
15 Street Of Dreams (Radio One Session 20/5/85) 4:43

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After Captain Sensible left the Damned in 1984 when his solo career took off with the freak success of his single "Happy Talk," Dave Vanian took over the creative reins of the group, and he began nudging their music in a direction that reflected his growing interest in the goth movement. The Damned's flirtation with goth led to them signing a major label deal for the first time and enjoying one of their biggest commercial successes with the 1985 album Phantasmagoria. But if that album found the Damned looking gingerly into a new direction, 1986's Anything was the sound of Vanian and company falling down a well; fans were probably savvy enough not to expect the Damned to sound like a straightforward punk band by this point, but most of Anything barely even qualifies as rock 'n' roll. The solo keyboard piece "The Portrait" bears an unfortunate resemblance to Nigel Tufnel's "Lick My Love Pump," "Restless" and "In Dulce Decorum" meander at length for all their thunder (and John Kelly's echoing production makes everything thunders if it's meant to or not), "Gigolo" suggests a failed merger of pop and prog rock, and "The Girl Goes Down" is a faintly ridiculous song that borrows from a number of vintage pop styles without distinction. Only "Psychomania" and the title cut generate anything approximating the energy of the Damned's best music, and it's telling that easily the best song on the album is a cover, a reasonably faithful rendition of Love's "Alone Again Or." The Damned began to crumble after Anything, and the band broke up for a spell in 1989.



The Damned - Anything (flac 246mb)

01 Anything 4:47
02 Alone Again Or 3:38
03 The Portrait 3:50
04 Restless 4:57
05 In Dulce Decorum 4:47
06 Gigolo 6:02
07 The Girl Goes Down 4:35
08 Tightrope Walk 4:21
09 Psychomania 4:03

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Sessions of the Damned is another fine stick with which to beat those who inexplicably fail to recognize the utter brilliance of the 1976-1984 Damned. Not only were they one of the funniest, wildest, and most irreverent bands of the punk and post-punk epochs, but as Sessions reminds, they were, just behind the Sex Pistols, Clash, and Buzzcocks, the fourth best and most exciting band of the explosive 1976-1977 liftoff -- only to evolve into one of the most accomplished pop groups. Previously issued on Dutch East India, this major-distributed compilation of BBC radio sessions is as good a place as any to sample the Damned's ample red-hots. It is grossly evident that the "record and mix four songs in one day" dictates of John Peel sessions suited these talented madcaps like the swanky Halston dresses Sensible once donned: live-in-the-studio "smash ups" of punk touchstones like "New Rose," "Neat Neat Neat," "Love Song," and "Smash It Up" compare well to the familiar U.K. hit versions. And while it would be impossible to improve on the speeding-train energy and euphoria of 1979's Machine Gun Etiquette renditions, the formative December 1978 looks at "Melody Lee" and the MC5's sped-up "Looking at You" (the first recordings of the newly reformed group, with Sensible moving from bass to guitar) match them for electricity and magnetism. As well, the Brian James-era lineup's "Sick of Being Sick" and "Stretcher Case Baby" are lesser-known classics of the form, filled with abandon and drummer Rat Scabies' Keith Moon-ish hyper drumming. Zow! Then, to top it off, the final six of the 22 cuts reveal the more mature, measured, yet still punishing melodic guitar pop gems the group favored from 1980-1984, the period of The Black Album and just after the immortal swan song Strawberries. Fine singer Dave Vanian stretches out wonderfully from paranoid punk shouter to moody, disturbed crooner on his "Curtain Call" opus (a funeral parlor eerie epic), while Sensible's parting prize "Thanks for the Night" is hard to keep from singing along with. And, as an added historical bonus, one gets to hear a lovely early version of the beguiling "Is It a Dream" before Sensible bolted (taking the band's creative spark with him), and a sharp cover of the Rolling Stones' psychedelic single "We Love You."



The Damned - Sessions Of The Damned (flac  459mb)

01 Stab Your Back 1:01
02 Neat Neat Neat 2:40
03 New Rose 2:41
04 So Messed Up 2:29
05 I Fall 2:11
06 Sick Of Being Sick 2:30
07 Stretcher Case Baby 1:49
08 Fan Club 3:03
09 Feel The Pain 3:34
10 Melody Lee 2:29
11 I'm A Burglar 3:29
12 Love Song 2:20
13 Looking At You 3:54
14 I Just Can't Be Happy Today 4:41
15 Smash It Up 4:02
16 I'm Bored 2:23
17 Curtain Call (Part 1) 10:26
18 Therapy 5:01
19 Is It A Dream? 3:26
20 Nasty 3:00
21 We Love You 2:34
22 Thanks For The Night 4:04

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Jan 24, 2017

RhoDeo 1704 Roots

Hello,

The music of Brazil encompasses various regional music styles influenced by African, European and Amerindian forms. After 500 years of history, Brazilian music developed some unique and original styles such as samba, bossa nova, MPB, sertanejo, pagode, tropicalia, choro, maracatu, embolada (coco de repente), mangue bit, funk carioca (in Brazil simply known as Funk), frevo, forró, axé, brega, lambada, and Brazilian versions of foreign musical genres, such as Brazilian rock and rap.


Today's artist became popular with the songs Se Acaso Você Chegasse, her first single, Mas Que Nada, A Carne, and other well-known samba songs. She was nominated to the Grammy Awards and was elected by the BBC London as "the singer of the millennium." In 2007, Soares was invited to sing a cappella the Brazilian National Anthem at the opening ceremony of the 2007 Panamerican Games. In 2016, she performed at the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, where she sang O Canto de Ossanha, a classic by Baden Powell and Vinícius de Moraes......N'Joy

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Owner of a distinctive, harsh voice (even if considering the conspicuous Armstrong mannerisms), Elza Soares is one of the most swinging samba singers. Having appeared in 1959 with the samba "Se Acaso Você Chegasse," Soares always had her artistic career complicated by her personal life, which certainly impeded her enjoyment of a more widespread popularity. Having gotten married at 12 and lost three children who died of hunger, she later became the wife of Garrincha, one of the most genial soccer players ever, and also a chronic alcoholic. The peak of her career was in the '60s, with albums like O Máximo em Samba (1967), Elza Soares & Wilson das Neves (1968), and Elza, Miltinho e Samba (a three-album series shared with Miltinho). In that decade she had several hits, among them "Boato," "Edmundo" (a version of "In the Mood"), "Beija-me," "Devagar Com a Louça," "Mulata Assanhada," "O Mundo Encantado de Monteiro Lobato," "Bahia de Todos os Deuses," "Palmas no Portão," and "Palhaçada." In the '70s, she had further success with "Salve a Mocidade" (1974) and "Malandro" (1977; this song launched Jorge Aragão as a composer). But it wasn't enough to prevent her from facing huge economical adversity, and at the same time she was being systematically turned away by recording companies. With Garrincha, Soares had a very troubled marriage and the untimely demise of their son Garrinchinha in 1986 in a car accident didn't help.

Living in extreme poverty throughout her childhood and teens, Soares had her first audition in radio at Ary Barroso's novice show when she was 16, winning first place. She was then hired as a crooner by the Orquestra Garam de Bailes (led by conductor Joaquim Naegli). She worked in the orchestra until 1954, when she became pregnant. In 1955, she was invited to star with Grande Otelo in the play Jour-Jou-Fru-Fru, which was a smash. Three years later, she toured Argentina, returning in the next year when she was hired by Rádio Vera Cruz. Also in 1959, she recorded a 78 rpm with "Se Acaso Você Chegasse" (Lupício Rodrigues/Felisberto Martins), one of her biggest hits. In 1960, she went to São Paulo where she performed regularly in the show I Festival Nacional de Bossa Nova and recorded her first LP, Se Acaso Você Chegasse. In 1962, she represented Brazil in Chile during the World Soccer Cup, where she met Garrincha.

Having recorded several albums with the hits "Só Danço Samba" (Tom Jobim/Vinícius de Moraes), "A Banca do Distinto" (Billy Blanco), "Pressentimento" (Elton Medeiros/Hermínio Bello de Carvalho), and "Princesa Isabel" (Sérgio Ricardo), she moved to Italy in 1969, where she performed at the Sistina Theater (Rome), returning to Brazil in 1972. In the same year, she opened the show Elza em Dia de Graça at the Opinião Theater (Rio) and participated in the Brasil Export Show (Canecão). Rediscovered in the '80s as a cult heroine by Os Titãs, she performed with the band in a regular show at the Madame Satã nightclub.

Trying unsuccessfully to develop a career abroad, she returned to Brazil in 1994, poor and depressed. Finally, she was rediscovered in the '80s by the younger generations of Brazilian rockers (Os Titãs, Lobão) and MPB artists like Caetano Veloso, having been awarded with a Sharp Prize award as the Best Samba Singer of 1997. Soares also recorded in duet with Caetano Veloso on his album, Velô, and with Lobão on Casa de Samba. With her Trajetória (1997), in which she was paid tribute by Zeca Pagodinho, she won the Prêmio Sharp Award as Best Samba Singer.Her life was depicted in the musical Crioula, which had several songs written specially for her by Chico Buarque, Chico César, Nei Lopes, and others.  In November 1999, Soares participated in the show Desde Que o Samba é Samba (at Royal Albert Hall, London, England), together with Chico Buarque, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, Gal Costa, and Virginia Rodrigues. In 2000, her life was depicted in the musical Crioula (by Stella Miranda). In 2000, she was appointed Singer of the Millennium by London's BBC. Soares continues to challenge her destiny, performing shows in every venue available.

Do Cóccix Até O Pescoço In 2002, she released the acclaimed Do Cóccix Até O Pescoço on Maianga Discos, which successfully wedded samba, bossa, and MPB with electronic sounds. Produced and recorded by Alê Siqueira, it featured an enormous cast of guest musicians under the direction of pianist Jose Miguel Wisnik, including Caetano Veloso, Chico Buarque, and Carlinhos Brown. It sold well internationally and received a Grammy nomination. Vivo Feliz followed on Tratore in 2004 and contained the singles "Rio de Janiero" and a reading of "Concordia" by Nando Reis, featuring the songwriter in a duet. Working again with Wisnik, she released the live Beba-Me Ao Vivo and a concert DVD with the same title in 2007.

Though Soares continued to perform, she took an extended break from recording. A year later she was the featured vocalist on the soundtrack of the film Chega de Saudade. She fell from the stage during a performance and required numerous spinal column surgeries. It slowed her down and forced her to perform in a chair, but she never stopped. In 2015, she re-entered the studio with with producer Guilherme Kastrup of São Paulo’s groundbreaking samba sujo scene. She didn't like his idea of recording a set of classic sambas in modern settings and instead insisted on creating entirely original new material -- a first in her long career. He hired the city's vanguard post-punk band Passo Torto (with Metá Metá's Kiko Dinucci) and several players from Bixiga 70. A Mulher Do Fim Do Mundo, a collection of 11 songs (culled from over 50), focuses on the achievement of justice for women, people of color, and members of the LGBT community -- causes she had celebrated throughout her life. Issued in Brazil in October by Circus Produções Culturais, it was celebrated in the national press as the year's best album by a national artist, regardless of genre. Due to global acclaim, it was re-released internationally by Mais Um Discos in June of 2016.


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Great stuff! A big band-and-salsa-tinged take on the Brazilian samba cancao sound, music that had definitely grown stale by the time this disc came out. Working once again with bandleader Astor Silva, Soares re-works oldies from the 1930s, '40s and '50s, giving them a rhythmic punch that lands it all somewhere between Lucio Alves and Ella Fitzgerald, with a strong hint of Carmen Miranda thrown in as well. I'm not sure how "bossa" one could actually consider this disc -- Soares was pals with the key members of the early bossa nova scene, but this disc is very much rooted in the pre-Jobim era, and the rowdy, jazz-tinged gafieira style. Anyway, it's a very good record.  Highly recommended.



Elza Soares - Se Acaso Você Chegasse, A Bossa Negra (flac  480mb)

01 Se Acaso Você Chegasse
02 Casa De Turfista...
03 Mulata Assanhada
04 Era Bom
05 Samba Em Copa
06 Dedo Duro
07 Teleco-Teco Nº 2
08 Contas
09 Sal E Pimenta
10 Cartão De Visita
11 Nêgo Tu...Nêgo Vós...Nêgo Você...
12 Não Quero Mais
A Bossa Negra
13 Tenha Pena De Mim (Ai, Ai, Meu Deus) 2:45
14 Boato 3:22
15 Fala Baixinho 2:17
16 Marambaia 2:05
17 O Samba Está Com Tudo 2:31
18 Cadeira Vazia 3:22
19 Perdão 2:18
20 Beija-me 2:24
21 O Bilhete 2:13
22 O Samba Brasileiro 2:26
23 As Polegadas Da Mulata 2:06
24 Eu Quero É Sorongar 2:51
bonus
25 Mack the knife
26 Edmundo
27 Avec no leblon
28 Aconteceu no leblon
29 A barata Serafina

Elza Soares - Se Acaso Você Chegasse, A Bossa Negra  (ogg  170mb)

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A fun, lively album, with perky pop-samba tunes arranged by bandleader Astor Silva, who's kind of old-school, but still a little hip. Many of the songs were samba-cancao golden oldies, but there's a also a whiff of newer material, such as Tom Jobim and Blilly Blanco's "Acho Que Sim." Monsueto Menezes duets on a couple of tracks, including his novelty scat, "Ziriguidum," which sufferes here under the weight of Astor's blatting brass arrangements, but is still a groovy little tune. All in all, this is a fun album, although it's a bit staid and static. Elza's such a cheerful presence, though -- hard not to love her!

Sambossa (1963), without surprise, is a continuation of the previous albums made for Odéon by Elza Soares: Se Acaso Voce Chegasse (1960), O Samba and Elza Soares (1961) and A Bossa Negra (1961). The interest of this type of album lies mainly in the vocal qualities of Elza Soares and its ability to generate an enthusiasm and a good mood thanks to its radiance. The compositions are not exceptional, but they are fairly well presented by the singing and pretty arrangements of Milton Miranda. In addition, the album is extremely rhythmic, only one song, "Maria, Mária, Mariá" (Billy Blanco) exceeds three minutes. This song is proposed twice, the second, which dates from 1962, being superior to the first. But the very good surprise of Sambossa, which is worth listening to, is the totally successful and sublimated version of the very good title of Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes, "Só Danço Samba" (in link). A very good record without pretension to immerse yourself in the futile universe of the Samba-Cançao Pop version Elsa Soares.



Elza Soares - O Samba É Elza Soares, Sambossa   (flac  522mb)

01 Eu E O Rio
02 Vedete Certinha
03 Teleco-Teco
04 Bom Mesmo E' Estar De Bem
05 Fez Bobagem
06 Amor De Mentira
07 Na Base Do Bilhetinho
08 Cantiga Do Morro
09 Acho Que Sim
10 Ziriguidum
11 Vou Sonhar Prá Você Ver
12 Reconciliação
Sambossa
13 Rosa Morena
14 Gamação
15 A Banca Do Distinto
16 Primeira Comunhão
17 Sim E Não
18 Leilão
19 Só Danço Samba
20 A Corda E A Caçamba
21 Vaca De Presépio
22 Maria, Mária, Mariá
23 Quando O Amor Não É Mais Amor
24 Mulata De Verdade
Bonus
25 Maria, Maria, Maria
26 Praga
27 Galã enganadora
28 Escurinho

Elza Soares - O Samba É Elza Soares , Sambossa      (ogg   173mb)

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A lively, high-powered album matching Soares's irrepressible vocals with groovy, jazzy gafieria backing from Severino Araujo and his band... The whole album features A-list studio talent: producer Milton Miranda is joined by Lyrio Panicalli and the Odeon studio crew... The results are first-rate: Elza's in fine form, and the music matches her mood, and her talent. Most of the songs are by (now) obscure composers -- of note are contributions from Orlandivo (the title track, "Na Roda De Samba") and Rildo Hora... Some inventive arrangements amid the standard-issue, big band-y samba-pop, but mostly it's about the feeling of the music: Elza's caught fire, and the guys at EMI are zeroing in on her wavelength.

In Brazilian music, the term "show" usually means a live performance, so you'd imagine that this would be a live album... Strangely, it isn't, although with the high proportion of material from classic, canonical composers -- including Atualfo Alves, Ary Barroso, Dorival Caymmi, Lupicino Rodrigues and Tom Jobim -- I think this was meant to be representative of what her live shows were like. Unfortunately, although the repertoire is all first-class, the backing by Maestro Nelsinho is a drab, at least in comparison to her earlier albums. Okay, but not great.



Elza Soares - Na Roda do Samba , Um Show de Elza (flac 470mb)

01 Na Roda Do Samba
02 Dja Ba Dja
03 Convite Ao Samba
04 Na Base Do Pingüim
05 Pressentimento
06 Samba Primeiro
07 Nêga
08 Gostoso É Sambar
09 Vou Rir De Você
10 Princesa Izabel
11 Domingo Em Copacabana
12 Banca De Pobre
Um Show de Elza
13 Ocultei
14 Verão No Meu Rio
15 Dindi
16 Samba Da Minha Terra
17 Ombro A Ombro
18 Pé Redondo
19 Vingança
20 Sambou Sambou
21 Porque E Para Que
22 Neném
23 Cais Do Porto
24 Se Acaso Você Chegasse
Bonus
25 Eu sou a outra
26 Amor impossível
27 De amor ou paz
28 Toque balanço, moço!

Elza Soares - Na Roda do Samba , Um Show de Elza    (ogg  165mb)

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