Aug 20, 2019

RhoDeo 1933 Mystery Knight 2

Hello,

As the public has been threatened with for decades with comet impacts by science and blockbuster movies, aren't these interchangeable these days, personally i go as far that astrophysics displays an amount of fantasy most blockbusters lack. June 30th marked the annual celebration of Asteroid Day, and science media used the occasion to suggest the need for greater funding for planetary defense against such an intruder. But just how real is the danger to Earth from kinetic impacts from asteroids, comets and meteors? Here's 14 minutes to demystefy comet-terror.


Asteroid Impact – How Big a Threat to Earth?






Most people just accept that our universe is ruled by gravity; an assumption that is wrong. Evidence instead shows that the force responsible for all of the objects and events we observe throughout the universe is the electric force that enables current flow and therefore magnetic fields to exist. If we consider that the electric force is fundamentally one thousand, billion, billion, billion, billion times more powerful than gravity and that the universe consists of 99.99% plasma; charged matter through which electric currents flow, then you have good reason to open your mind and watch what this video has to say.

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Today, the 2nd part of the third tale of Ser Duncan the Tall and his squire Egg, The Mystery Knight

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George R. R. Martin is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of many novels, including the acclaimed series A Song of Ice and Fire on which HBO based the world’s most-watched television series, Game of Thrones., A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords, A Feast for Crows, and A Dance with Dragons—as well as Tuf Voyaging, Fevre Dream, The Armageddon Rag, Dying of the Light, Windhaven (with Lisa Tuttle), and Dreamsongs Volumes I and II. His science fiction novella Nightflyers has also been adapted as a television series; and he is the creator of the shared-world Wild Cards universe, working with the finest writers in the genre. As a writer-producer, Martin has worked on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and pilots that were never made. He lives with his wife the lovely Parris in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


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Tales of Dunk and Egg is a series of fantasy novellas by George R. R. Martin, set in the world of his A Song of Ice and Fire novels. They follow the adventures of "Dunk" (the future Lord Commander of the Kingsguard, Ser Duncan the Tall) and "Egg" (the future king Aegon V Targaryen), some 90 years before the events of the novels. Three novellas have been published – The Hedge Knight (1998), The Sworn Sword (2003), and The Mystery Knight (2010) – and Martin has stated his intention to continue the series.

The Mystery Knight

The third novella was published in 2010 in the anthology Warriors, edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois.[5]

Like The Sworn Sword, the book takes place during the reign of Aerys I and the aftermath of the Blackfyre Rebellion is examined in more detail.
Plot

The story begins with Dunk and Egg leaving Stoney Sept, to ask service with Lord Beron Stark against Greyjoy raids on the northern coast. On the way they encounter a septon beheaded for preaching treason; and later a group of knights and minor lords traveling to a tourney in honor of the wedding of Lord Butterwell of Whitewalls to a Frey of the Crossing, wherein the victor's prize is a dragon egg. Dunk takes a dislike to Gorman Peake, whom he believes the killer of his own mentor's former squire. Egg tells Dunk that Peake's arms of three castles on an orange field is because the Peake family owned three castles, but forfeited two to the Crown when Peake sided with Blackfyre. During the journey Dunk befriends three other itinerant knights: Ser Maynard Plumm, Ser Kyle the Cat of Misty Moor, and Ser Glendon Ball who claims to be the bastard son of the famous knight Quentyn "Fireball", who fought for Daemon Blackfyre.

The wedding is set at Whitewalls and Lord Frey arrives with his four-year-old heir, Walder Frey, and his fifteen-year-old daughter, who weds Lord Butterwell. Egg becomes increasingly suspicious when he sees that most of the competitors belonged to the rebel party. During the wedding Dunk is drafted by John the Fiddler to carry the bride to the bedchamber. Dunk does so and later hears from John that the latter once saw Duncan himself, in a dream, in the armor of the royal guard. Dunk enters the first match of the joust under the name of 'Gallows Knight' (for a new shield acquired after the loss of his own); but is defeated in the first tilt by Ser Uthor Underleaf, known as the Snail Knight for his sigil. Duncan later gives Underleaf his armor and horse as forfeit, and Underleaf informs Dunk that someone bribed him to kill Dunk in the final tilt. Before the jousting continues, word spreads through the castle that the dragon egg is missing, and the blame is placed on Ser Glendon Ball, who is imprisoned by Peake. In search of the absent Egg, Duncan is wounded by Alyn Cockshaw, who claims to have bribed Uthor Underleaf, and throws him into a well. Maynard Plumm comes to Duncan's aid, and it is discovered that Plumm is one of Brynden "Bloodraven" Rivers' many spies (or possibly Bloodraven himself), and that John the Fiddler is the eponymous son of Daemon Blackfyre. Dunk finds Egg in the sept with the cowering Lord Butterwell, who on discovering Egg's true identity is terrified for his life. Lord Butterwell's son-in-law Black Tom Heddle tries to kill Egg to incite a war, and is killed by Duncan, who thereupon tells Egg to flee with Butterwell. To buy time for Egg's escape Dunk confronts the younger Daemon Blackfyre, and accuses Gorman Peake of falsely charging Ball with the theft of the dragon egg.

Daemon allows Ball to prove his innocence in trial by combat, in which Ser Glendon soundly defeats Daemon. By this time a large army under Bloodraven, who is also the King's Hand, encircles Whitewalls, and Daemon is captured. Dunk and Egg meet Bloodraven, and Egg demands that Bloodraven reward Glendon, Duncan, and the other hedge knights. For surrendering to Bloodraven without a fight, Lord Butterwell is spared his life and allowed a tenth of his wealth; but his fortress is forfeit to the Iron Throne and torn down. Bloodraven, at Egg's request, gives Dunk the gold to ransom his armor. When Dunk asks Bloodraven what became of the dragon egg, Bloodraven tells Dunk it was taken by an agent of his (implied to be one of the performing dwarfs at the wedding).


George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Mystery Knight 2 ( 106min mp3     43mb).


01 The Mystery Knight 2 106min



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previously

George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Hedge Knight 1 ( 103min mp3     35mb).
George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Hedge Knight 2 ( 85min mp3     65mb).

George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Hedge Knight  (CBR  265mb)


George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword 1-4 ( 75min mp3     26mb).
George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword 5-7 ( 60min mp3     21mb).
George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword 8-11 ( 72min mp3     25mb).

George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword ( CBR 283mb).


George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Mystery Knight 1 ( 63min mp3     18mb).





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Aug 19, 2019

RhoDeo 1933 Re-Up 201

Hello,


9 correct requests for this week, 1 now in flac, 3 unavailable (aetix-roots),  0 double (same artist) , whatever another batch of 32re-ups (9.8gig)


These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a smaller number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here remember to request from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned), and please check the previous update request if it's less then a year old i won't re-up either.

Looka here , requests fulfilled up to August 18th... N'Joy

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4x Grooves NOW in Flac ( Cameo - Cardiac Arrest, Cameo - We All Know Who We Are, Cameo - Ugly Ego, Cameo - Secret Omen)


3x Sundaze Back in Flac ( Celtic Cross - Hicksville, Kumba Mela Experiment - East Of The River Ganges , Dub Trees - Nature Never Did Betray The Heart That Loved Her  )



3x Sundaze  Back  in Flac (Alpha Wave Movement -  Transcendense, Alpha Wave Movement - The Edge Of Infinity , Alpha Wave Movement - Drifted Into Deeper Lands)



4x Sundaze Back In Flac (The Cinematic Orchestra - Motion, Cinematic Orchestra - Remixes 98-00 , Cinematic Orchestra - Everyday, Cinematic Orchestra - Man With A Movie Camera  )



3x Sundaze NOW in Flac (Bvdub & Ian Hawgood - The Truth Hurts, Bvdub - I Remember, Bvdub - Resistance Is Beautiful )



3x Grooves NOW in Flac (Savannah Band - Dr Buzzard's Original , Cory Daye  - Cory and Me, Kid Creole  - Off The Coast Of Me )


4x Sundaze Back in Flac ( Namlook-Mixmaster Morris - Dreamfish, Namlook-Mixmaster Morris - Dreamfish 2 , Mixmaster Morris & Jonah Sharp - Quiet Logic, Mixmaster Morris - The Morning After)



4x Grooves Back in Flac (Con Funk Shun - Touch, Con Funk Shun - 7, Con Funk Shun - To The Max, Con Funk Shun - Electric Lady)


4x Sundaze Back in Flac (All India Radio - Permanent Evolutions, All India Radio ‎– Fall exp, All India Radio - These Winter Dreams, All India Radio - Film Musik)


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Aug 18, 2019

Sundaze 1933

Hello,



If most artists in contemporary electronica are like islands unto themselves, turning out tracks in relative anonymity, Pete "Namlook" Kuhlmann was a whole continent. A dizzyingly prolific composer who steadily built up an entire industry around his Frankfurt-based Fax label, Namlook's name was inextricably linked with the post-rave resurgence of ambient music, and many of his solo and collaborative recordings with the likes of Mixmaster Morris, Tetsu Inoue, Klaus Schulze, Bill Laswell, Richie Hawtin, Geir Jenssen, Dr. Atmo, Burhan Ocal, Atom Heart, Jonah Sharp, Charles Uzzell-Edwards, and David Moufang, among many others, number among the most lauded and influential in new ambient. "...  ......N-Joy

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Pete Namlook (born 25 November 1960 as Peter Kuhlmann [phon koolman] in Frankfurt, Germany, died on 8 November 2012) was an ambient and electronic-music producer and composer., the extremely prolific Pete Namlook (1960-2012) was one of the high priests of new-school ambient, ie. ambient techno, trance, lounge and other related dance-music spinoffs. In its 20 year history his record label Fax Records released some of the definitive albums in these sub-genres and Namlook stands alongside a handful of other names such as The Orb, Biosphere and Mixmaster Morris as one of the originators of ambient's resurgence and reinvention via dance music in the late 80's and early 90's.

Intriguingly, he often favoured the sounds of analogue synthesisers over digital and - alongside fellow German e-musician Oliver Lieb - was reputed to have one of the most extensive collections of classic analogue equipment in Europe. And although he downplayed the linage, like many of his new-school peers his music has some of its roots in old-school electronica as varied as Brian Eno, psy rockers Pink Floyd, and Krautrock icons like Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream.

But Namlook was no imitator. He deepened and refined the sound of his predecessors with an injection of fresh ideas from the dance world, coupled with fine musicianship honed from many years of playing rock and jazz. In a 2007 interview with e-music magazine Slices he actually made a point of distancing his music from the conceptual influence of Eno particularly:

"You have to differentiate quite clearly between ambient in a techno sense, and on the other hand Brian Eno, a purely conceptual thing. I only knew of a collaboration between Brian Eno and Cluster [the German band], and him with Roxy Music. I only bought his ambient stuff later. Ambient as Eno defines it...is more or less musical wallpaper. It stays in the background and serves the environment rather than saying something about itself. In my definition of ambient, which has nothing in common with Eno's definition, it's about a journey, intense emotions that need to be transported - environmental music, jazz, ethno - depending on what project I'm working on".

The genesis of Fax Records

Although he had long dreamed of making a career from ambient electronica, in Fax Records' early days he was mainly pursuing a dance floor-oriented direction and releasing 12-inch vinyl singles to a warm reception from sectors of Europe's club scene.

But Namlook soon became dismayed at other artists' appropriation of the Frankfurt "hard trance" sound (developed through his genre-defining 4 Voice project). Thankfully his ambient B-sides to these singles - in hindsight a brilliant strategy - were also creating plenty of interest. Within a few years of the label's inception he had set about focusing Fax almost entirely on ambient and downtempo styles.

Up to his death in 2012 Namlook released an enormous number of solo and collaborative albums of widely varying quality both under his own name and various other project monikers. Collectors should be aware that many CD's were very limited pressings and some will be difficult to find, even more so now that Namlook has gone and the label is no more. Certain key titles were re-issued on CD and download from time to time, however, and much of the Fax catalogue is now spread widely online.

The Silence series

Silence (1992) is the one that started it all, Fax's first album release and one which caught the ear of both seasoned electronic boffins and dance fans looking for a chilled-out tonic after a night among the thumping beats of clubland. Both this album and Silence II (1993) are collaborations with close associate Dr Atmo and despite being at times almost new age in their choice of themes (a voice whispers sweet cosmic nothings like "we are all part of the universe") the music is outstanding. These beguiling, shimmering, reverberant landscapes are sometimes beatless and sometimes gently beaty with subdued live pads and cymbals. The 20 minute "Garden Of Dreams" is a particular mesmerising blend of slow Mid-Eastern rhythms with sighing and crying electronic chords.

Continuing the series is the the Persian-tinged Silence III (1998) which features Namlook on his own. Titles like "Mirage" "Into The Desert" and “A Ship On A Sea Of Sand” are just perfect; his sense of place is quite stunning and he understands the visual qualities of ambient sound exceptionally well. His creative range across entire series is impressive: from stately progressions of warm, organic-sounding orchestral synthscapes to atonal, purely atmospheric pieces of pure texture. When it comes to sound design Namlook’s attention to detail is faultless, which makes hearing his music on good hi-fi equipment especially rewarding. Silence III is followed by two more superb albums in the series.

The surreal, innovative first volume of Dreamfish (1993) with collaborator Mixmaster Morris is another genre-defining release, still cited today as a favourite by fans of early post-rave ambient. The environmental sound effects are deployed in a quirky way amongst the textured, gently rhythmic landscapes and the music brims with surprises and quiet invention. The jazzy bass notes on "Fishology", for example, move along at a good clip yet are so subtle that the track's calming qualities are never disturbed. The first three volumes of the Air series are also high-water marks for Namlook. Like the Silence series they show some rich ethnic and neo-classical leanings, and they remain particularly effective examples of how he uses live acoustic instruments in an electronic setting. The delicate, tinkling cymbals and soft tom-tom beats on "Je suis seule et triste ici" from Air I (1993), for instance, are utterly refreshing because Namlook is able to maintain a deep electronic ambient feel while still expanding electronica's instrumental vocabulary.

Air II (1994) is deeply psychedelic. An eleven-part "trip" subtitled "Traveling Without Moving", it takes it's thematic cue from Frank Herbert's cult sci-fi novel and movie Dune. Herbert's story posited a strange universe dependant on a life-extending, mind-altering spice drug. On Air II Namlook subtly draws on the story's themes to create a beautiful, creepy, intoxicating universe of his own. Again he utilizes acoustic instruments: didgeridoo, sighing woodwinds, flamenco guitar, Mid-Eastern flutes, and swooping vocal textures that rise and fall to striking effect. They're all integrated seamlessly, proving that despite the club music influences he thrived by exploring outside the rigid structures of electronic beats and sequencing.

Other collaborations

Although as an artist Namlook's focus was far broader than just club-influenced sounds, when he did get into more squelchy or bleepy techy-trance territory the results could be just as stimulating. On the brilliant two-part title track from The Fires Of Ork (1993) that thumping 4/4 kick drum is there alright, but somehow Namlook and cohort Gier Jenssen (aka Biosphere) have managed to mute it just enough to create a truly "ambient" dance music: thunderous yet shadowy and eerie, built around a voice sample of Rutger Hauer from Blade Runner. Also beats-based is the the superb first volume of From Within (1994), one of the pinnacles of ambient techno that marries Namlook's warm keys and spiralling synth sounds with the sparse bleeps and beats of Canadian techno guru Richie Hawtin. Again, the rhythms don't drive you into the ground but rather lull you into a gentle if uneasy trance, particularly on "Million Miles To Earth" and "Sad Alliance". The third in this series, From Within III (1997) is also outstanding

Namlook after the mid 90's

While many aficionados would agree that the early to mid 1990's produced most of Fax's - and Namlook's - most enduring releases, it would be unfair to dismiss some of Namlook's work since then. Highlights from 1995-2001 include the final volumes in what is probably Namlook's greatest series, the magnificent Silence IV (2000) and Silence V (2001). The luminous piano notes and warm orchestral synths of "The Night Before I Left" from Silence IV might just be the most emotional piece of music Namlook has ever made, an elegy that's at once incredibly sad and jaw-droppingly pretty. From the same album is the extraordinary "Bedouin Love", a dark, swirling epic with thunderous Moroccan drums, a strange spoken Arabic monologue and chilling yet beautiful synthesiser chords. In the same sonic universe as the Silence albums is From Within 3 from 1997, again made with Richie Hawtin but this time quite different from earlier volumes due to its softer, warmer sound. There's feather-soft lead guitar lines, lush strings, jazzy improvising and warm analogue melodies, all held together by subtle, intelligent drum programming. It's a fantastic example of accessible, soulful electronica.

In the 2000's and beyond Namlook continued with a busy release schedule of solo albums and collaborations but rarely with the same impact his music made in the previous decade. Not that there's lack of variety; for hardcore Fax fans there's plenty to explore. Experimental releases like New Organic Life (2002) are scarily unfamiliar, experimental, arguably unlistenable at times. Some outstanding individual melodic tracks appear on otherwise less-then-great albums such as Resonate (2006) and Namlook Le Mar (2009). However, some of his other collaborative albums made after the mid 90's - not listed on this page - are highly recommended including recordings with Tetsu Inoue, Klaus Schulze and Wolfram Spyra.

Death and legacy

Aged just 51, Namlook died unexpectedly in his sleep of a heart attack on 8 November 2012. Maintaining his intense work rate right up to the night he passed away, some wondered whether Namlook simply drove himself into the ground, literally living and dying for his art. Yet his sister told UK music journalist Mark Prendergast that "he went to bed happy" that day. Who are we to judge? Namlook left behind an extraordinary and enormous recorded legacy, as well as a generation of underground electronic producers and composers inspired by both his talents and his uncompromising independence. Fax Records is no more, though for the moment a good deal of his discography remains available. Hopefully a sensible licensing deal with the Kuhlmann estate will enable another publisher take on the best of his catalogue and keep it available in the coming decades. He deserves no less.

The tribute: Die Welt ist Klang

A superb Namlook tribute album appeared in 2013, almost as essential as any of the work released by the man himself. Die Welt ist Klang ("The World Is Sound") was put together in 2012-13 via a crowdfunding campaign by Dave Wade-Stein from EAR/Rational Music, the longtime North American distributor for Fax and related labels. The album is presented thus: four volumes of mostly new or unreleased music by former Fax artists, and four volumes of new material by mostly unknown musician-fans.

It's only fitting that one of the most prolific recording artists in the history of music - in all recorded music, not just a genre - should be honoured with a sprawling 8-volume tribute. It would take pages to review so much music in detail; suffice to say the standard of contributions overall is very high. Interestingly, most of the former Fax artists here don't seek to recapture peak moments from their past works. They just do what they do - from beatless ambient to bleepy dance grooves, from lounge to techno, from gentle dissonance to sweet, tender melodies. As for the the 40 or so musician-fan contributions, they were chosen from a large pool of submissions by a blind vote. Although there are some easy-to-spot pastiches among them, here too there is much freshness and surprise.

Die Welt ist Klang is a massive treasure chest of (mostly) new ambient and electronica. Some of it is the sound of now and some of it wistfully looks back. All of it acknowledges the contributions and example of one remarkable man.


Namlook" is "Koolman", a phonetic rendering of his real name, spelled backwards.

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The first in a series of collaborative improvisations by German experimentalists Pete Namlook & Atom Heart (Uwe Schmidt), 1995's Jet Chamber is a bit on the spotty side, but the tracks that work are sublime, some of the best ambient electronica of their era. The opening track, the 31-minute "Split Wide," is a bliss-out classic, with only a jarring midsection of atonal noise bursts from both members disturbing the placid beauty of the undulating keyboard lines. The comparatively brief "Chaos Impuls" (only four minutes, by far the shortest track on the hour-plus album) is a similarly environmental soundscape, but the remaining three tracks, "Rotor Cabinet," "Feedback Fluctuation," and "Streamline," are slightly more structured, with lolling beats and occasional washes of melody stretching out over Namlook's space rock-inspired keyboard and processor sounds. The last is a particular gem, as Atom Heart builds a teasingly repetitive groove that Namlook parries with for a good 11 minutes or so. All five volumes of the Jet Chamber series are strictly for ambient electronica fans, but those looking for an accessible entrée into Pete Namlook's dauntingly huge discography could do much worse than starting here.



Pete Namlook • Atom Heart - Jet Chamber ( flac   333mb)

01 Split Wide 30:51
02 Rotor Cabinet 12:25
03 Chaos Impuls 4:08
04 Feedback Fluctuation 10:13
05 Streamline 11:12

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Like a movie sequel that's basically a retread of the original, there's a definite "been there, done that" feel to the second entry in Pete Namlook & Atom Heart's Jet Chamber series of collaborative improvisations, but like the best movie sequels, there's just enough of a changeup in Jet Chamber II to keep it from becoming redundant. Where Namlook was clearly in control of 1995's Jet Chamber, Jet Chamber II is more of a showcase for his beat-making partner. Atom Heart is all over this album, making up for his subdued presence on its predecessor by creating a strange array of whirring, clicking, and chattering beats under Namlook's trademark Krautrock-inspired synths. The first and last of the three extended tracks, the 18-and-a-half-minute "Inner Rotation" and the nearly 27-minute "Outer Rotation," are driven by Atom Heart's beats and loops, with the latter track reaching moments of sheer atonality about two-thirds of the way through. In contrast, the aptly titled 17-minute "Calm Box" is almost all Namlook, a close relation to the sublime "Split Wide" from Jet Chamber, though with a slightly more structured and less amorphous feel akin to parts of Brian Eno's Discreet Music.



.Pete Namlook • Atom Heart - Jet Chamber II ( 280mb)

01 Inner Rotation 18:30
02 Rotation 17:20
03 Outer Rotation 26:56


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Pete Namlook and Uwe Schmidt (aka Atom Heart) hold each other up in the studio with an acceptable trio of sci-fidelity tracks. Like so many albums on the FAX record label, Jet Chamber V falls back on familiar strengths, filtered through the latest technology. Consequently it's a showcase for both the artists as well as the gear they plug into. "I Miss Green" spins out stuttering little robot beats with a gridwork of synth -- a very energizing and sterile track with stray beams of light shooting out from time to time, but the piece evolves primarily by way of adding and subtracting a dozen elements over the course of 21 minutes. It's reminiscent of early Spacetime Continuum material, but lengthier. "Tightness" is a darker groove, clicking and beeping with the same compositional state of suspended animation, under an ambient drone. Here, it's like the synchronized backdrop to a Kraftwerk song, rather than the song itself. It's the very picture of German engineering. "Voted Steady" squawks, gurgles, clunks, and chirps along, like a curious assembly of alien metronomes keeping time with harmonic keyboards floating overhead. It's the circuit boards of the equipment having a miniature drunken argument with themselves, and therefore a bit disposable. Jet Chamber V is essentially another notch in the very, very long belts of Namlook and Schmidt, an album that neither breaks new ground nor crashes into it. For collectors of the FAX outpouring, it's a finger on the label's pulse.



Pete Namlook • Atom Heart - Jet Chamber V (flac 242mb)

01 I Miss Green 21:26
02 Tightness 16:59
03 Voted Steady 13:40

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The Kool Man was one serious collaborator as the three albums he did with Russian sound collage outfit The New Composers should testify. 12 songs? What is this a box set. No, these are actually short and very entertaining pieces that go from odd space pop to abstract ambient. Worth checking out for more then just the Namlook fan.



Pete Namlook • New Composers - Planetarium ( 250mb)

01 Life on Mars 3:14
02 There Is Not Another World 6:48
03 Echnaton 3:27
04 Waters of Love 3:45
05 Tetra 5:55
06 Musika i slowa 3:22
07 Indigo 4:07
08 The Second Sector 3:22
09 In the Memory of Magnitola 3:16
10 Una 3:15
11 Bellan 2:37
12 Shadows of Shadows 7:00

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While Planetarium was more structured like something New Composers would release on their own, Planetarium 2 has Pete Namlook taking the pilot's wheel this time, attempting to get an intriguing space epic out of his work with the New Composers, starting with a rather lengthy intro "Moontrip", with a lot of repeated bleeps and NASA samples from Namlook. (later on, we hear some Russian sample that we assume are provided by New Composers) And thus, for the first half it's lot of spacey danciness that takes us back to the days of The Fires of Ork and Alien Community. Surprisingly, it's when the New Composers really come in that things actually get interesting. "Space Casino" is a goofy cheesy track made up of a lot of samples, most notably ones lifted from anime, I presume. Along with "Space Ballet", which is a sound collage piece featuring some disjointed piano along with various Russian TV samples, it's enough to make you wish they come out with a whole album in this style. "Spirit Preparation" and "225" have Namlook and New Composers finally coming to together to give us some great space ambient and have you looking forward to what this collaboration will bring in the future.



Pete Namlook • New Composers - Planetarium 2 ( 345mb)

01 Moontrip 11:45
02 Start Process 10:23
03 Urgent Message 2:54
04 MIR Station - Selektor 8:36
05 Space Casino 4:17
06 6 Beta 9 Answer 3:44
07 Spirit Preparation 8:53
08 Space Ballet 3:48
09 225 2:43

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Aug 16, 2019

RhoDeo 1932 Grooves

Hello,


Today's Artist (born August 31, 1963 in Los Angeles, California), better known by his stage name Egyptian Lover, is an American musician, vocalist, producer and DJ, and was an important part of the L.A. dance music and rap scene in the early 1980s.. ...... N Joy

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Greg Broussard started out as a DJ in Los Angeles with Uncle Jamm's Army, DJing dances as large as the L.A. Sports Arena with 10,000 people. He began recording around Los Angeles in 1982 as a member of the Radio Crew, as well as Uncle Jamm's Army. As the Egyptian Lover he became one of the most innovative producers of the old-school/electro era.

He recorded a parade of singles during the mid-'80s that proved influential for decades. Influenced himself by Kraftwerk/hip-hop soundclashes like Afrika Bambaataa's "Planet Rock" and Man Parrish's "Hip-Hop Be Bop (Don't Stop)," as well as the extroverted black-lover soul of Prince and Zapp, Broussard began recording from his Los Angeles base in 1983. One year later, he emerged with the breakdancing anthem "Egypt, Egypt," released on the Freak Beat label. Similar to excellent tracks being produced all over America -- from Detroit (Cybotron) to New York (Mantronix) -- "Egypt, Egypt" and successors "What Is a DJ If He Can't Scratch," "And My Beat Goes Boom," and "Computer Love (Sweet Dreams)" spent much time in DJ crates during the '80s and '90s. Broussard also released several LPs from the mid-'80s through the '90s, highlighted by 1984's On the Nile (practically a greatest-hits compilation), 1986's One Track Mind, and 1994's Back from the Tomb. He returned in 2006 with Platinum Pyramids, continued to perform live -- including dates with M.I.A. -- produced a track for Rye Rye, and, in 2015, released the long-in-the-works 1984. The following year, Stones Throw compiled 1983-1988, a proper anthology of Broussard's early highlights. It included a couple re-edits from label boss Peanut Butter Wolf, who sampled "What Is a DJ If He Can't Scratch" during his early-'90s partnership with MC Charizma.

Most of the Egyptian Lover's successful recordings were 12" singles. He eventually released some of the earliest rap LPs, but they were less popular than his singles. On the strength of an alternate mix of his most popular single "Egypt, Egypt", 1984's On the Nile was moderately successful.

The Egyptian Lover also established his own record company, Egyptian Empire Records, which included artists such as Rodney O & Joe Cooley 2 Oclock & Te & Joezee.

His 2015 release, 1984, continues his tradition of using all analog equipment, including his famed Roland TR-808 (which he is widely known as "the king of"), along with much of the same gear used on his recordings of the 1980s. The name "1984" refers to his earlier albums. The album was recorded at Skip Saylor, Encore Studios, and at RUSK Studios, the same studio where On The Nile was recorded in 1984.

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The electro producer also known as Greg Broussard recalls the studio techniques and diverse influences that made his records club hits in the 80s, and explains why the sound will never die

He was inspired at first by early electro – Afrika Bambaataa’s Planet Rock, Twilight Kingdom by Electric 22 – and by the records that inspired those artists (Kraftwerk’s Numbers was a key track) as well as Prince’s lithe dawn-of-the-1980s synth-funk. He set about building his tracks in layers, starting with “drum machine, maybe a beat programmed. And I could play it really loud in the studio, until I could get something I really liked. Then I started adding the keys, the bassline, the strings. I would let the record play over and over again, sit in the studio and write the lyrics to the record while it was being played. Then go on to the microphone, do the vocals and the song was done.”

He learned how records work by spending time in clubs, which is why the vocals were the least laboured-over part of Egyptian Lover tracks. “I started out as a dancer,” he says, “and I used to go to the clubs to dance. Then I became a DJ, and I knew what records or what parts of the records to play. Everybody liked these certain parts, so I would extend the breakdowns, put more breakdowns over the breakdowns, then more breakdowns and beats, because that’s what I wanted to dance to. When I was watching the crowd dance to certain records, they’d love the beats, they didn’t need to have words. I put the words on there so people know the name of the song.”

The Egyptian Lover character was inspired by the imagery from Earth, Wind & Fire’s releases, and from Broussard’s trip to see the treasures of Tutankhamun’s tomb when they toured the US in the late 70s. “I saw the King Tut exhibit, with this young king with his own empire, and that’s why I called my label Egyptian Empire.”

And there was another singer who really fired Broussard up. “Dean Martin has inspired me more than anyone has ever known,” he says. “Dean Martin was that sexy, ‘I got women’ kind of guy. I was in love with that whole image, and that’s where a lot of the Egyptian Lover’s image came from. He had a song called Crying Time, and I took that and made I Cry (Night After Night). My dad had a collection of Dean Martin albums, and I could pick the very first one he made, one in the middle of his career and one at the end of his career, and every one of those albums sound the same. I said to myself, ‘If I ever became a singer’ – this was before rap – ‘I would do it exactly like that.’ Because now when you buy a Dean Martin album, you’re getting a Dean Martin album. So I’m not going to change my style.”

He’s still pursuing that style – he talks about the 12in singles he plans to release from last year’s album 1984, and his hope to write a film script based on his life story. Whatever comes next, he’s still dedicated to his sound, and sure he’ll always find his audience.

“When you feel that beat and hear that music,” he says, “it makes you want to dance, it makes you feel good and have a good time. To this very day, some people like this sound, some people looooove this sound, and they go way out in the field to hear it.”


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Before Ice-T, N.W.A., and the late Eazy-E made Los Angeles famous (or infamous) for gangsta rap in the late '80s, the city's rap community was best known for a high-tech, futuristic approach that owed a lot to Afrika Bambaataa's 1982 classic, "Planet Rock." In the early to mid-'80s, L.A.-based electro-hoppers like the Egyptian Lover, the World Class Wreckin' Cru (the group that Dr. Dre belonged to before N.W.A.), the Arabian Prince, and Uncle Jam's Army didn't get much respect from East Coast hip-hoppers, who insisted that their music wasn't gritty enough. But those artists did enjoy a cult following in Southern California. Besides, the Egyptian Lover never claimed to be a hardcore rapper; On the Nile, his debut album of 1984, doesn't pretend to be a Run-D.M.C., L.L. Cool J, or Fat Boys release any more than Grover Washington, Jr. claimed to be a jazz purist. The closest this LP comes to an East Coast hip-hop vibe is the single "What Is a DJ If He Can't Scratch"; all of the other tracks offer a synthesizer-driven blend of rap, dance music, and electro-funk. Though "Planet Rock" is a strong influence on this release, it is hardly the Egyptian Lover's only influence -- his sound also owes a debt to Germany's seminal Kraftwerk (whose innovations greatly influenced "Planet Rock"), Prince, Man Parrish, and Giorgio Moroder, as well as Middle Eastern and North African music. The Egyptian Lover never had great rapping skills, but he was definitely an original and imaginative producer/writer -- and his risk-taking spirit serves him well on definitive, high-tech tunes like "Egypt Egypt," "My House (On the Nile)," and "Girls." On the Nile isn't the only Egyptian Lover LP that is worth owning, but most fans insist that it is his most essential and consistent album -- and they're absolutely right.



 The Egyptian Lover - On The Nile  (flac   216mb)

01 My House (On the Nile) 04:21
02 What Is a D. J. If He Can't Scratch 03:17
03 Girls 07:05
04 Computer Love (Sweet Dreams) 03:14
05 Egypt, Egypt 05:19
06 I Cry (Night After Night) 05:04
07 Unreal 05:32
08 And My Heart Goes Boom 04:12

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When the Egyptian Lover's second album, One Track Mind, came out in 1986, gangsta rap had yet to become huge. Ice-T's Rhyme Pays and N.W.A's N.W.A. & the Posse -- two landmarks in West Coast gangsta rap -- didn't come out until 1987, and East Coast hip-hoppers still associated Southern California with the electro-hop style that the Egyptian Lover is best known for. Anyone who expects to find hardcore rap on One Track Mind is bound to be disappointed; this LP isn't for rap purists. But those who appreciated his first album, On the Nile, will find this to be a respectable, if imperfect, sophomore effort. Egyptian's influences remain the same; the quirky rapper/producer still combines his appreciation of Afrika Bambaataa's "Planet Rock," Prince, Man Parrish, and Kraftwerk with elements of North African music and Egyptian imagery. It's a strange mixture -- Egyptian inhabits a place in which rap, Prince's Minneapolis sound, European synth pop, and North African music come together. But it's a mixture that works well on infectious electro-hop jams like "Livin' on the Nile," the single "Freak-A-Holic," and "A Stranger Place (The Alezby Inn)," which bears a bit of a resemblance to Prince's "Erotic City." As the title One Track Mind indicates, the Egyptian Lover shares Prince's love of all things erotic. But this LP is never X-rated; the lyrics are suggestive rather than explicit, which is why some of the tunes on One Track Mind had urban radio potential. Egyptian, however, was never a superstar, although he did enjoy an enthusiastic cult following. While One Track Mind isn't as essential as On the Nile, it's a likable release that fans of the electro-hop sound will enjoy.



The Egyptian Lover - One Track Mind  (flac   242mb)

01 One Track Mind 5:31
02 You're So Fine 2:41
03 The Dark Side Of Egypt 4:18
04 Livin' On The Nile 1:10
05 Freak-A-Holic 4:33
06 The Lover 5:31
07 A Strange Place (The Alezby Inn) 5:51
08 Los Angeles 3:35
09 Kinky Nation (Kingdom Kum) 3:17


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It's ironic that many East Coast hip-hoppers of the 1980s had such a low opinion of the Egyptian Lover and other Los Angeles residents who specialized in the electro-hop style -- ironic because Egyptian and his colleagues were heavily influenced by Afrika Bambaataa's "Planet Rock," which is considered one of 1982's definitive New York hip-hop singles. Of course, Egyptian was never the hardcore hip-hopper that Bambaataa is; his forte is a club-friendly mixture of rap, dance music, and synth funk. When Filthy came out in 1988, electro-hop was starting to decline in popularity in Southern California -- thanks to the success of Ice-T, N.W.A, and Eazy-E, Los Angeles rappers were becoming known for gangsta rap instead of electro-hop. But Egyptian carried on, avoiding hardcore rap and sticking to material that had a lot of dance and urban appeal. Parts of Filthy find him singing instead of rapping, including the addictive synth funk single "D.S.L.'s"; the Cameo-minded "Overdose"; and the eerie, Europop-influenced "Whisper in Your Ear." Meanwhile, Egyptian sticks to rapping on futuristic, "Planet Rock"-influenced electro-hop items such as "Baddest Beats Around" and "I Want Cha." Egyptian isn't a great singer any more than he is a great rapper -- his strong points are producing and writing -- but he still manages to be effective. The most surprising thing on the LP is a cover of Booker T. & the M.G.'s' early-'60s instrumental "Green Onions," which gets an almost Doors-like makeover -- not the sort of thing one expected from Egyptian, but then, he always did have eclectic tastes. A fairly diverse effort, Filthy falls short of essential but will appeal to Egyptian's die-hard fans.



The Egyptian Lover - Filthy (flac   397mb)

01 D.S.L.'s
02 I Want Cha
03 Whisper In Your Ear
04 Overdose
05 Baddest Beats Around
06 I'm Thru With You
07 Planet E
08 Filthy
09 Green Onions

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This album was released in 1989 as a best of package. There is only 8 songs, but they sound great on this CD, on the other LP's of Egyptian Lover, the songs are shorter and they don't even finish. Here, they go all the way through till the living end. This is a classic album to throw on at parties. Ok, it's 80's classic. Favorite songs are "Egypt,Egypt" and "The Lover". Meanwhile awesome collection of The Egyptian Lover's music, also, the sound quality is top notch. Highly recommended if you're a fan of electric funk.



The Egyptian Lover - King Of Ecstasy (flac   430mb)

01 Sexy Style (Greatest Hits Dub Mix) 7:22
02 My House on the Nile (Greatest Hits Mix) 9:04
03 Freak-A-Holic (12" Dub Mix) 7:15
04 You're So Fine (Greatest Hits Edit) 6:48
05 Egypt, Egypt (12" Original Mix) 6:49
06 The Alezby Inn (Remodeled Vocal Version) 9:31
07 The Lover (12" Long Mix) 9:56
08 Girls (Dub Mix) 9:31

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Aug 13, 2019

RhoDeo 1932 Mystery Knight 1

Hello,

"Einstein's relativity work is a magnificent mathematical garb which fascinates, dazzles and makes people blind to the underlying errors. The theory is like a beggar clothed in purple whom ignorant people take for a king....Its exponents are  brilliant men but they are metaphysicists rather than scientists."

Nikola Tesla (the smartest man in the world-according to Einstein)


Electric Universe theories explained by GENIUS Plasma Dave!






Most people just accept that our universe is ruled by gravity; an assumption that is wrong. Evidence instead shows that the force responsible for all of the objects and events we observe throughout the universe is the electric force that enables current flow and therefore magnetic fields to exist. If we consider that the electric force is fundamentally one thousand, billion, billion, billion, billion times more powerful than gravity and that the universe consists of 99.99% plasma; charged matter through which electric currents flow, then you have good reason to open your mind and watch what this video has to say.




Today, the final part of the second tale of Ser Duncan the Tall and his squire Egg, a year has passed from the time Dunk almost lost a hand and foot, but gained a royal squire. He is now under the employ of Ser Eustace and thanks to conflicts with his neighbor, The Red Widow, we get to know more about the Targaryen history and their conflicts.

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George R. R. Martin is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of many novels, including the acclaimed series A Song of Ice and Fire on which HBO based the world’s most-watched television series, Game of Thrones., A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords, A Feast for Crows, and A Dance with Dragons—as well as Tuf Voyaging, Fevre Dream, The Armageddon Rag, Dying of the Light, Windhaven (with Lisa Tuttle), and Dreamsongs Volumes I and II. His science fiction novella Nightflyers has also been adapted as a television series; and he is the creator of the shared-world Wild Cards universe, working with the finest writers in the genre. As a writer-producer, Martin has worked on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and pilots that were never made. He lives with his wife the lovely Parris in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


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Tales of Dunk and Egg is a series of fantasy novellas by George R. R. Martin, set in the world of his A Song of Ice and Fire novels. They follow the adventures of "Dunk" (the future Lord Commander of the Kingsguard, Ser Duncan the Tall) and "Egg" (the future king Aegon V Targaryen), some 90 years before the events of the novels. Three novellas have been published – The Hedge Knight (1998), The Sworn Sword (2003), and The Mystery Knight (2010) – and Martin has stated his intention to continue the series.

The Mystery Knight

The third novella was published in 2010 in the anthology Warriors, edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois.[5]

Like The Sworn Sword, the book takes place during the reign of Aerys I and the aftermath of the Blackfyre Rebellion is examined in more detail.
Plot

The story begins with Dunk and Egg leaving Stoney Sept, to ask service with Lord Beron Stark against Greyjoy raids on the northern coast. On the way they encounter a septon beheaded for preaching treason; and later a group of knights and minor lords traveling to a tourney in honor of the wedding of Lord Butterwell of Whitewalls to a Frey of the Crossing, wherein the victor's prize is a dragon egg. Dunk takes a dislike to Gorman Peake, whom he believes the killer of his own mentor's former squire. Egg tells Dunk that Peake's arms of three castles on an orange field is because the Peake family owned three castles, but forfeited two to the Crown when Peake sided with Blackfyre. During the journey Dunk befriends three other itinerant knights: Ser Maynard Plumm, Ser Kyle the Cat of Misty Moor, and Ser Glendon Ball who claims to be the bastard son of the famous knight Quentyn "Fireball", who fought for Daemon Blackfyre.

The wedding is set at Whitewalls and Lord Frey arrives with his four-year-old heir, Walder Frey, and his fifteen-year-old daughter, who weds Lord Butterwell. Egg becomes increasingly suspicious when he sees that most of the competitors belonged to the rebel party. During the wedding Dunk is drafted by John the Fiddler to carry the bride to the bedchamber. Dunk does so and later hears from John that the latter once saw Duncan himself, in a dream, in the armor of the royal guard. Dunk enters the first match of the joust under the name of 'Gallows Knight' (for a new shield acquired after the loss of his own); but is defeated in the first tilt by Ser Uthor Underleaf, known as the Snail Knight for his sigil. Duncan later gives Underleaf his armor and horse as forfeit, and Underleaf informs Dunk that someone bribed him to kill Dunk in the final tilt. Before the jousting continues, word spreads through the castle that the dragon egg is missing, and the blame is placed on Ser Glendon Ball, who is imprisoned by Peake. In search of the absent Egg, Duncan is wounded by Alyn Cockshaw, who claims to have bribed Uthor Underleaf, and throws him into a well. Maynard Plumm comes to Duncan's aid, and it is discovered that Plumm is one of Brynden "Bloodraven" Rivers' many spies (or possibly Bloodraven himself), and that John the Fiddler is the eponymous son of Daemon Blackfyre. Dunk finds Egg in the sept with the cowering Lord Butterwell, who on discovering Egg's true identity is terrified for his life. Lord Butterwell's son-in-law Black Tom Heddle tries to kill Egg to incite a war, and is killed by Duncan, who thereupon tells Egg to flee with Butterwell. To buy time for Egg's escape Dunk confronts the younger Daemon Blackfyre, and accuses Gorman Peake of falsely charging Ball with the theft of the dragon egg.

Daemon allows Ball to prove his innocence in trial by combat, in which Ser Glendon soundly defeats Daemon. By this time a large army under Bloodraven, who is also the King's Hand, encircles Whitewalls, and Daemon is captured. Dunk and Egg meet Bloodraven, and Egg demands that Bloodraven reward Glendon, Duncan, and the other hedge knights. For surrendering to Bloodraven without a fight, Lord Butterwell is spared his life and allowed a tenth of his wealth; but his fortress is forfeit to the Iron Throne and torn down. Bloodraven, at Egg's request, gives Dunk the gold to ransom his armor. When Dunk asks Bloodraven what became of the dragon egg, Bloodraven tells Dunk it was taken by an agent of his (implied to be one of the performing dwarfs at the wedding).


George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Mystery Knight 1 ( 63min mp3     18mb).


01 The Mystery Knight 1 63min



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previously

George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Hedge Knight 1 ( 103min mp3     35mb).
George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Hedge Knight 2 ( 85min mp3     65mb).

George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Hedge Knight  (CBR  265mb)


George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword 1-4 ( 75min mp3     26mb).
George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword 5-7 ( 60min mp3     21mb).
George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword 8-11 ( 72min mp3     25mb).

George R. R. Martin - Song of Ice and Fire Prequel - The Sworn Sword ( CBR 283mb).







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Aug 12, 2019

RhoDeo 1932 Re-Ups 200

Hello,


8 correct requests for this week, 2 now in flac, 4 unavailable (aetix-roots),  0 double (same artist) , whatever another batch of 32re-ups (10.3gig)


These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a smaller number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here remember to request from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned), and please check the previous update request if it's less then a year old i won't re-up either.

Looka here , requests fulfilled up to August 11th... N'Joy

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3x Grooves NOW in Flac ( Five Blind Boys Of Alabama - Platinum Gospel, The Swan Silvertones - Love Lifted Me My Rock,  Little Anthony And The Imperials - 25  )


4x Sundaze Back in Flac ( VA - Ambient Diary.One 1, VA - Ambient Diary.One 2, VA - Ambient Diary.Two 1, VA - Ambient Diary.Two 2 )



3x Sundaze  Back  in Flac ( Alpha Wave M & Jim Cole - Bislama, Alpha Wave Movement - A Distant Signal, Alpha Wave Movement - Cosmology)


4x Sundaze Back In Flac (The Cinematic Orchestra - Ma Fleur, Cinematic Orchestra - Live At The Royal , Cinematic Orchestra - Crimson Wing, Cinematic Orchestra - LateNightTales  )



4x Grooves NOW in Flac (Material - Temporary Music (1979-1981), Praxis - Metatron, VA - Axiom Funk - Funkcronomicon 1, VA - Axiom Funk - Funkcronomicon 2 )



4x Sundaze Back in Flac (Carbon Based Lifeforms - Hydroponic Garden , Carbon Based Lifeforms - World of Sleepers, Carbon Based Lifeforms - Interloper, Carbon Based Lifeforms - Twentythree )



6x Netherlands NOW in Flac ( Clashing Egos - Rubicon, Solex - Pick Up , Junkie XL - Saturday Teenage Kick, Legowelt - Classics 1998-2003, Voicst - 11-11 , Kettel - Cenny Crush)



4x Sundaze Back in Flac (Kevin Kendle - Deep Skies 1 - Light From Orion, Kevin Kendle - Deep Skies 2 - Lagoon Of Eternity , Kevin Kendle - Deep Skies 3 - Light From The Pleiades, Kevin Kendle - Deep Skies 4 - Light From Andromeda)



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Aug 11, 2019

Sundaze 1932

Hello, poor filthy rich mr Epstein,  just another dick for brains, despite having having managed to acquire billions, he clearly lacked imagination and the guts to face up to his victims and did a very unjewish thing, killing oneself. Probably thinking that way he could save his family from more shame and friends from having to name them as business partners in crime. These young unspoiled girls are just too irresistible for wealthy dick for brains, as most men are dick for brains it clearly isn't an issue of money, but an issue of inferior conscience, well that's planet Earth for ya.



If most artists in contemporary electronica are like islands unto themselves, turning out tracks in relative anonymity, Pete "Namlook" Kuhlmann was a whole continent. A dizzyingly prolific composer who steadily built up an entire industry around his Frankfurt-based Fax label, Namlook's name was inextricably linked with the post-rave resurgence of ambient music, and many of his solo and collaborative recordings with the likes of Mixmaster Morris, Tetsu Inoue, Klaus Schulze, Bill Laswell, Richie Hawtin, Geir Jenssen, Dr. Atmo, Burhan Ocal, Atom Heart, Jonah Sharp, Charles Uzzell-Edwards, and David Moufang, among many others, number among the most lauded and influential in new ambient. "...  ......N-Joy

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Pete Namlook (born 25 November 1960 as Peter Kuhlmann [phon koolman] in Frankfurt, Germany, died on 8 November 2012) was an ambient and electronic-music producer and composer., the extremely prolific Pete Namlook (1960-2012) was one of the high priests of new-school ambient, ie. ambient techno, trance, lounge and other related dance-music spinoffs. In its 20 year history his record label Fax Records released some of the definitive albums in these sub-genres and Namlook stands alongside a handful of other names such as The Orb, Biosphere and Mixmaster Morris as one of the originators of ambient's resurgence and reinvention via dance music in the late 80's and early 90's.

Intriguingly, he often favoured the sounds of analogue synthesisers over digital and - alongside fellow German e-musician Oliver Lieb - was reputed to have one of the most extensive collections of classic analogue equipment in Europe. And although he downplayed the linage, like many of his new-school peers his music has some of its roots in old-school electronica as varied as Brian Eno, psy rockers Pink Floyd, and Krautrock icons like Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream.

But Namlook was no imitator. He deepened and refined the sound of his predecessors with an injection of fresh ideas from the dance world, coupled with fine musicianship honed from many years of playing rock and jazz. In a 2007 interview with e-music magazine Slices he actually made a point of distancing his music from the conceptual influence of Eno particularly:

"You have to differentiate quite clearly between ambient in a techno sense, and on the other hand Brian Eno, a purely conceptual thing. I only knew of a collaboration between Brian Eno and Cluster [the German band], and him with Roxy Music. I only bought his ambient stuff later. Ambient as Eno defines it...is more or less musical wallpaper. It stays in the background and serves the environment rather than saying something about itself. In my definition of ambient, which has nothing in common with Eno's definition, it's about a journey, intense emotions that need to be transported - environmental music, jazz, ethno - depending on what project I'm working on".

The genesis of Fax Records

Although he had long dreamed of making a career from ambient electronica, in Fax Records' early days he was mainly pursuing a dance floor-oriented direction and releasing 12-inch vinyl singles to a warm reception from sectors of Europe's club scene.

But Namlook soon became dismayed at other artists' appropriation of the Frankfurt "hard trance" sound (developed through his genre-defining 4 Voice project). Thankfully his ambient B-sides to these singles - in hindsight a brilliant strategy - were also creating plenty of interest. Within a few years of the label's inception he had set about focusing Fax almost entirely on ambient and downtempo styles.

Up to his death in 2012 Namlook released an enormous number of solo and collaborative albums of widely varying quality both under his own name and various other project monikers. Collectors should be aware that many CD's were very limited pressings and some will be difficult to find, even more so now that Namlook has gone and the label is no more. Certain key titles were re-issued on CD and download from time to time, however, and much of the Fax catalogue is now spread widely online.

The Silence series

Silence (1992) is the one that started it all, Fax's first album release and one which caught the ear of both seasoned electronic boffins and dance fans looking for a chilled-out tonic after a night among the thumping beats of clubland. Both this album and Silence II (1993) are collaborations with close associate Dr Atmo and despite being at times almost new age in their choice of themes (a voice whispers sweet cosmic nothings like "we are all part of the universe") the music is outstanding. These beguiling, shimmering, reverberant landscapes are sometimes beatless and sometimes gently beaty with subdued live pads and cymbals. The 20 minute "Garden Of Dreams" is a particular mesmerising blend of slow Mid-Eastern rhythms with sighing and crying electronic chords.

Continuing the series is the the Persian-tinged Silence III (1998) which features Namlook on his own. Titles like "Mirage" "Into The Desert" and “A Ship On A Sea Of Sand” are just perfect; his sense of place is quite stunning and he understands the visual qualities of ambient sound exceptionally well. His creative range across entire series is impressive: from stately progressions of warm, organic-sounding orchestral synthscapes to atonal, purely atmospheric pieces of pure texture. When it comes to sound design Namlook’s attention to detail is faultless, which makes hearing his music on good hi-fi equipment especially rewarding. Silence III is followed by two more superb albums in the series.

The surreal, innovative first volume of Dreamfish (1993) with collaborator Mixmaster Morris is another genre-defining release, still cited today as a favourite by fans of early post-rave ambient. The environmental sound effects are deployed in a quirky way amongst the textured, gently rhythmic landscapes and the music brims with surprises and quiet invention. The jazzy bass notes on "Fishology", for example, move along at a good clip yet are so subtle that the track's calming qualities are never disturbed. The first three volumes of the Air series are also high-water marks for Namlook. Like the Silence series they show some rich ethnic and neo-classical leanings, and they remain particularly effective examples of how he uses live acoustic instruments in an electronic setting. The delicate, tinkling cymbals and soft tom-tom beats on "Je suis seule et triste ici" from Air I (1993), for instance, are utterly refreshing because Namlook is able to maintain a deep electronic ambient feel while still expanding electronica's instrumental vocabulary.

Air II (1994) is deeply psychedelic. An eleven-part "trip" subtitled "Traveling Without Moving", it takes it's thematic cue from Frank Herbert's cult sci-fi novel and movie Dune. Herbert's story posited a strange universe dependant on a life-extending, mind-altering spice drug. On Air II Namlook subtly draws on the story's themes to create a beautiful, creepy, intoxicating universe of his own. Again he utilizes acoustic instruments: didgeridoo, sighing woodwinds, flamenco guitar, Mid-Eastern flutes, and swooping vocal textures that rise and fall to striking effect. They're all integrated seamlessly, proving that despite the club music influences he thrived by exploring outside the rigid structures of electronic beats and sequencing.

Other collaborations

Although as an artist Namlook's focus was far broader than just club-influenced sounds, when he did get into more squelchy or bleepy techy-trance territory the results could be just as stimulating. On the brilliant two-part title track from The Fires Of Ork (1993) that thumping 4/4 kick drum is there alright, but somehow Namlook and cohort Gier Jenssen (aka Biosphere) have managed to mute it just enough to create a truly "ambient" dance music: thunderous yet shadowy and eerie, built around a voice sample of Rutger Hauer from Blade Runner. Also beats-based is the the superb first volume of From Within (1994), one of the pinnacles of ambient techno that marries Namlook's warm keys and spiralling synth sounds with the sparse bleeps and beats of Canadian techno guru Richie Hawtin. Again, the rhythms don't drive you into the ground but rather lull you into a gentle if uneasy trance, particularly on "Million Miles To Earth" and "Sad Alliance". The third in this series, From Within III (1997) is also outstanding

Namlook after the mid 90's

While many aficionados would agree that the early to mid 1990's produced most of Fax's - and Namlook's - most enduring releases, it would be unfair to dismiss some of Namlook's work since then. Highlights from 1995-2001 include the final volumes in what is probably Namlook's greatest series, the magnificent Silence IV (2000) and Silence V (2001). The luminous piano notes and warm orchestral synths of "The Night Before I Left" from Silence IV might just be the most emotional piece of music Namlook has ever made, an elegy that's at once incredibly sad and jaw-droppingly pretty. From the same album is the extraordinary "Bedouin Love", a dark, swirling epic with thunderous Moroccan drums, a strange spoken Arabic monologue and chilling yet beautiful synthesiser chords. In the same sonic universe as the Silence albums is From Within 3 from 1997, again made with Richie Hawtin but this time quite different from earlier volumes due to its softer, warmer sound. There's feather-soft lead guitar lines, lush strings, jazzy improvising and warm analogue melodies, all held together by subtle, intelligent drum programming. It's a fantastic example of accessible, soulful electronica.

In the 2000's and beyond Namlook continued with a busy release schedule of solo albums and collaborations but rarely with the same impact his music made in the previous decade. Not that there's lack of variety; for hardcore Fax fans there's plenty to explore. Experimental releases like New Organic Life (2002) are scarily unfamiliar, experimental, arguably unlistenable at times. Some outstanding individual melodic tracks appear on otherwise less-then-great albums such as Resonate (2006) and Namlook Le Mar (2009). However, some of his other collaborative albums made after the mid 90's - not listed on this page - are highly recommended including recordings with Tetsu Inoue, Klaus Schulze and Wolfram Spyra.

Death and legacy

Aged just 51, Namlook died unexpectedly in his sleep of a heart attack on 8 November 2012. Maintaining his intense work rate right up to the night he passed away, some wondered whether Namlook simply drove himself into the ground, literally living and dying for his art. Yet his sister told UK music journalist Mark Prendergast that "he went to bed happy" that day. Who are we to judge? Namlook left behind an extraordinary and enormous recorded legacy, as well as a generation of underground electronic producers and composers inspired by both his talents and his uncompromising independence. Fax Records is no more, though for the moment a good deal of his discography remains available. Hopefully a sensible licensing deal with the Kuhlmann estate will enable another publisher take on the best of his catalogue and keep it available in the coming decades. He deserves no less.

The tribute: Die Welt ist Klang

A superb Namlook tribute album appeared in 2013, almost as essential as any of the work released by the man himself. Die Welt ist Klang ("The World Is Sound") was put together in 2012-13 via a crowdfunding campaign by Dave Wade-Stein from EAR/Rational Music, the longtime North American distributor for Fax and related labels. The album is presented thus: four volumes of mostly new or unreleased music by former Fax artists, and four volumes of new material by mostly unknown musician-fans.

It's only fitting that one of the most prolific recording artists in the history of music - in all recorded music, not just a genre - should be honoured with a sprawling 8-volume tribute. It would take pages to review so much music in detail; suffice to say the standard of contributions overall is very high. Interestingly, most of the former Fax artists here don't seek to recapture peak moments from their past works. They just do what they do - from beatless ambient to bleepy dance grooves, from lounge to techno, from gentle dissonance to sweet, tender melodies. As for the the 40 or so musician-fan contributions, they were chosen from a large pool of submissions by a blind vote. Although there are some easy-to-spot pastiches among them, here too there is much freshness and surprise.

Die Welt ist Klang is a massive treasure chest of (mostly) new ambient and electronica. Some of it is the sound of now and some of it wistfully looks back. All of it acknowledges the contributions and example of one remarkable man.


Namlook" is "Koolman", a phonetic rendering of his real name, spelled backwards.

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The first of many recorded sessions between Pete Namlook and David Moufang that focus on day-long live and unplanned studio recordings that are then edited and mixed down to CD length. The first single step of a long journey through this uncharted landscape.
For those who are familiar with Move D's Kunstoff, the lush ambient "Giant Mushroom" is a definite pleaser. "Drop Kick" starts the duo off with the basics; very simple beats and funk that slowly get mingled and played with throughout the record. Things seem to finally come together for "Coda" which puts the ambience, beats, and funk on the same page. A decent and fairly classic beginning that foreshadows the future direction of quantity over quality and sound over construction and composition.



Namlook • Move D - I - Exploring The Psychedelic Landscape ( flac   302mb)

01 Giant Mushroom 11:21
02 Drop Kick 16:59
03 Floor 16:38
04 Saucerful 6:23
05 Coda 13:39

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More of a great improvement over the formula and style of the first release which involved taking a day-long non-rehearsed studio jam and mixing it down for a full-length album. "Wake Up" is a simple dreamy ambient melody that becomes the basis for the rest of the album. The second track introduces some funky beats that moves into an somewhat candid electro jam session. Towards the end of "Into a Wonderful Maze" it aburptly shifts into ambient mode using the opening melody and things come together for "Down at the EMC". From there things really mellow out but things get upbeat again one last time for "In The End" for a balanced blend of ambient and electro. Listening from start to finish is highly recommended



Namlook • Move D - II, A Day In The Live! ( 256mb)

01 Wake Up 4:14
02 Fall out of Bed 4:10
03 Into a Wonderful Maze 13:45
04 Down to the EMC 13:33
05 Where We Chill Out 6:08
06 As Peter Plays the Strings 3:16
07 At the End 7:36


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As soon as the opening chords for Softwired land, you know this release has officially set the high bar for the collaborative efforts of Pete Namlook and David Moufang. Deep, lush and a bit jazzy, the long Softwired opus is some of the best upbeat ambient music to come out of FAX and it's impromptu collaborations. A bit of over halfway through, things idle a bit so that Pete can get on his guitar, which, this time, doesn't really fit in all to well sad to say. Dave backs him up on keys during his solo, which last about five minutes before things idle again for another instrument change/set up, leading to a more laid back rendition of the Softwired theme. At 27 minutes, it certainly could have been split up, giving us cuts where it kind of idles (i.e. right before and after the guitar jam). Hardwired, on the other hand, gets broken up into three tracks, and as the name suggests, it goes a bit harder and faster but with that lush atmosphere you got on Softwired. We get two closing tracks: "Wear Your Love Out" keeps the same warm atmosphere going, just much softer and more chill, while "1969" gets more experimental before briefly moving into a theme but ending and leaving you with a minute of almost absolute silence. Widely considered a Fax classic, this is one of the very best of the Move D/Namlook collaborations. It holds together as an album beautifully, and the three "Hardwired" tracks form a trio of sublime, beat-driven ambience that is just tailor-made for driving.



Namlook • Move D - V, Wired (flac 380mb)

01 Softwired 27:38
02 Short Return of the Astrogator 0:21
03 Hardwired - Tangent 8:39
04 Hardwired - Hypoteneuse 9:33
05 Hardwired - Asymptote 4:39
06 Wear Your Love Out 8:21
07 1969 8:44

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FAX meets WARP!
Artificial Intelligence fans are in for a treat here. Namlook collaborates with ones of the founders of Warp Records, Rob Gordon, and surprisingly enough, the result is the sound that made the early days of Warp so memorable. Pete describes this as being different because it combines, "Beats, Chords, Melodies & Bass" but isn't that the what good music is normally comprised of? A lot of classic elements both upbeat and laid back that are familiar to fans of early Aphex Twin, LFO, and Richard Kirk come together for a pleasant sci-fi trip. "The Hunt", though, is an offseting industrial drum piece, which seems to describe the choatic future of IDM, that will spoil this album for most, since the other three tracks features such a priceless mixture of ambient and techno, it leaves you with a letdown, much like the end of SHADO 2. One of the few IDM gems on FAX.



Pete Namlook • Rob Gordon - Ozoona ( 289mb)

01 She Ship 11:24
02 Flat Pack 12:58
03 Blackbird Suite 17:41
04 The Hunt 11:22

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"Kooler" is mainly referred to as an experimental Namlook's album, nevertheless it's pretty digestible, as some moments here are literally breathtaking. The sounds are crystal clear and deeply reverberated: saxophone/trumpet (mostly short solos and fragmentary puffs), guitar, faraway percussions, phone female voice and various electro-acoustic tricks Namlook is so famous for. Imagine yourself floating through an empty futuristic city with huge buildings when listening to this album. A fascinating sonic adventure for open-minded people with high-quality audio equipment. Recommended.



Pete Namlook • Robert Sattler - Kooler ( 270mbmb)

01 Urban Isolationism 47:54
02 Metro 10:10

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Aug 9, 2019

RhoDeo 1931 Grooves

Hello,


Today's Artists Christopher George Latore Wallace (May 21, 1972 – March 9, 1997), known professionally as The Notorious B.I.G., Biggie Smalls, or Biggiewas an American rapper. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Wallace was born and raised in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. His debut album made him a central figure in East Coast hip hop and increased New York City's visibility in the genre at a time when West Coast hip hop dominated the mainstream. The following year, he led Junior M.A.F.I.A.—a protégé group composed of his childhood friends—to chart success. In 1996, while recording his second album, Wallace was heavily involved in the growing East Coast–West Coast hip hop feud. On March 9, 1997, he was murdered by an unknown assailant in a drive-by shooting in Los Angeles. His second album, released two weeks later, rose to No. 1 on the U.S. album charts. In 2000, it became one of the few hip-hop albums to be certified Diamond. Wallace was noted for his "loose, easy flow"; dark, semi-autobiographical lyrics; and storytelling abilities, which focused on crime and hardship. Three more albums have been released since his death, and he has certified sales of over 17 million records in the United States, including 13.4 million albums..  . ...... N Joy

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In just a few short years, the Notorious B.I.G. went from a Brooklyn street hustler to the savior of East Coast hip-hop to a tragic victim of the culture of violence he depicted so realistically on his records. His all-too-brief odyssey almost immediately took on mythic proportions, especially since his murder followed the shooting of rival Tupac Shakur by only six months. In death, the man also known as Biggie Smalls became a symbol of the senseless violence that plagued inner-city America in the waning years of the 20th century. Whether or not his death was really the result of a much-publicized feud between the East and West Coast hip-hop scenes, it did mark the point where both sides stepped back from a rivalry that had gone too far. Hip-hop's self-image would never be quite the same, and neither would public perception. The aura of martyrdom that surrounds the Notorious B.I.G. sometimes threatens to overshadow his musical legacy, which was actually quite significant. Helped by Sean "Puffy" Combs' radio-friendly sensibility, Biggie reestablished East Coast rap's viability by leading it into the post-Dr. Dre gangsta age. Where fellow East Coasters the Wu-Tang Clan slowly built an underground following, Biggie crashed onto the charts and became a star right out of the box. In the process, he helped Combs' Bad Boy label supplant Death Row as the biggest hip-hop imprint in America, and also paved the way to popular success for other East Coast talents like Jay-Z and Nas. Biggie was a gifted storyteller with a sense of humor and an eye for detail, and his narratives about the often violent life of the streets were rarely romanticized; instead, they were told with a gritty, objective realism that won him enormous respect and credibility. The general consensus in the rap community was that when his life was cut short, sadly, Biggie was just getting started.

The Notorious B.I.G. was born Christopher Wallace on May 21, 1972, and grew up in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. He was interested in rap from a young age, performing with local groups like the Old Gold Brothers and the Techniques, the latter of whom brought the teenaged Wallace his first trip to a recording studio. He had already adopted the name Biggie Smalls at this point, a reference to his ample frame, which would grow to be over six feet tall and nearly 400 pounds. Although he was a good student, he dropped out of high school at age 17 to live his life on the streets. Attracted by the money and flashy style of local drug dealers, he started selling crack for a living. He got busted on a trip to North Carolina and spent nine months in jail, and upon his release, he made some demo recordings on a friend's four-track. The resulting tape fell into the hands of Mister Cee, a DJ working with Big Daddy Kane; Cee in turn passed the tape on to hip-hop magazine The Source, which gave Biggie a positive write-up in a regular feature on unsigned artists. Thanks to the publicity, Biggie caught the attention of Uptown Records producer Sean "Puffy" Combs, who signed him immediately. With his new daughter in need of immediate financial support, Biggie kept dealing drugs for a short time until Combs found out and laid down the law. Not long after Biggie's signing, Combs split from Uptown to form his own label, Bad Boy, and took Biggie with him.

Changing his primary stage name from Biggie Smalls to the Notorious B.I.G., the newly committed rapper made his recording debut on a 1993 remix of Mary J. Blige's single "Real Love." He soon guested on another Blige remix, "What's the 411?," and contributed his first solo cut, "Party and Bullshit," to the soundtrack of the film Who's the Man? Now with a considerable underground buzz behind him, the Notorious B.I.G. delivered his debut album, Ready to Die, in September 1994. Its lead single, "Juicy," went gold, and the follow-up smash, "Big Poppa," achieved platinum sales and went Top Ten on the pop and R&B charts. Biggie's third single, "One More Chance," tied Michael Jackson's "Scream" for the highest debut ever on the pop charts; it entered at number five en route to an eventual peak at number two, and went all the way to number one on the R&B side. By the time the dust settled, Ready to Die had sold over four million copies and turned the Notorious B.I.G. into a hip-hop sensation -- the first major star the East Coast had produced since the rise of Dr. Dre's West Coast G-funk.

Not long after Ready to Die was released, Biggie married R&B singer and Bad Boy labelmate Faith Evans. In November 1994, West Coast gangsta star Tupac Shakur was shot several times in the lobby of a New York recording studio and robbed of thousands of dollars in jewelry. Shakur survived and accused Combs and his onetime friend Biggie of planning the attack, a charge both of them fervently denied. The ill will gradually snowballed into a heated rivalry between West and East Coast camps, with upstart Bad Boy now challenging Suge Knight's Death Row empire for hip-hop supremacy. Meanwhile, Biggie turned his energies elsewhere. He shepherded the career of Junior M.A.F.I.A., a group consisting of some of his childhood rap partners, and guested on their singles "Player's Anthem" and "Get Money." He also boosted several singles by his labelmates, such as Total's "Can't You See" and 112's "Only You," and worked with superstars like Michael Jackson (HIStory) and R. Kelly ("[You to Be] Happy," from R. Kelly). With the singles from Ready to Die still burning up the airwaves as well, Biggie ended 1995 as not only the top-selling rap artist, but also the biggest solo male act on both the pop and R&B charts. He also ran into trouble with the law on more than one occasion. A concert promoter accused Biggie and members of his entourage of assaulting him when he refused to pay the promised fee after a concert cancellation. Later in the year, Biggie pled guilty to criminal mischief after attacking two harassing autograph seekers with a baseball bat.

The year 1996 was even more tumultuous. More legal problems ensued after police found marijuana and weapons in a raid on Biggie's home in Teaneck, New Jersey. Meanwhile, Junior M.A.F.I.A. member Lil' Kim released her first solo album under Biggie's direction, and the two made little effort to disguise their concurrent love affair. 2Pac, still nursing a grudge against Biggie and Combs, recorded a vicious slam on the East Coast scene called "Hit 'Em Up," in which he taunted Biggie about having slept with Faith Evans (who was by now estranged from her husband). What was more, during the recording sessions for Biggie's second album, he suffered rather serious injuries in a car accident and was confined to a wheelchair for a time. Finally, in September 1996, Tupac Shakur was murdered in a drive-by shooting on the Las Vegas strip. Given their very public feud, it didn't take long for rumors of Biggie's involvement to start swirling, although none were substantiated. Biggie was also criticized for not attending an anti-violence hip-hop summit held in Harlem in the wake of Shakur's death.

Observers hoped that Shakur's murder would serve as a wake-up call for gangsta rap in general, that on-record boasting had gotten out of hand and spilled into reality. Sadly, it would take another tragedy to drive that point home. In the early morning hours of March 9, 1997, the Notorious B.I.G. was leaving a party at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, thrown by Vibe magazine in celebration of the Soul Train Music Awards. He sat in the passenger side of his SUV, with his bodyguard in the driver's seat and Junior M.A.F.I.A. member Lil' Cease in the back. According to most witnesses, another vehicle pulled up on the right side of the SUV while it was stopped at a red light, and six to ten shots were fired. Biggie's bodyguard rushed him to the nearby Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, but it was already too late. As much as Shakur was mourned, Biggie's death was perhaps even more shocking; it meant that Shakur's death was not an isolated incident, and that hip-hop's highest-profile talents might be caught in the middle of an escalating war. Naturally, speculation ran rampant that Biggie's killers were retaliating for Shakur's death, and since the case remains unsolved, the world may never know for sure.

In the aftermath of the tragedy, the release of the Notorious B.I.G.'s second album went ahead as planned at the end of March. The eerily titled Life After Death was a sprawling, guest-laden double-disc set that seemed designed to compete with 2Pac's All Eyez on Me in terms of ambition and epic scope. Unsurprisingly, it entered the charts at number one, selling nearly 700,000 copies in its first week of release and spending a total of four weeks on top. The first single, "Hypnotize," went platinum and hit number one on the pop chart, and its follow-up, "Mo Money Mo Problems," duplicated both feats, making the Notorious B.I.G. the first artist ever to score two posthumous number one hits. A third single, "Sky's the Limit," went gold, and Life After Death was certified ten times platinum approximately two years after its release. Plus, Combs -- now rechristened Puff Daddy -- and Faith Evans scored one of 1997's biggest singles with their tribute, "I'll Be Missing You." In 1999, an album of previously unreleased B.I.G. material, Born Again, was released and entered the charts at number one. It eventually went double platinum. Six years later, Duets: The Final Chapter (studio scraps paired with new verses from several MCs and vocalists) surfaced and reached number three on the album chart.

In the years following Christopher Wallace's death, little official progress was made in the LAPD's murder investigation, and it began to look as if the responsible parties would never be brought to justice. The 2Pac retaliation theory still holds sway in many quarters, and it has also been speculated that members of the Crips gang murdered Wallace in a dispute over money owed for security services. In an article for Rolling Stone, and later a full book titled Labyrinth, journalist Randall Sullivan argued that Suge Knight hired onetime LAPD officer David Mack -- a convicted bank robber with ties to the Bloods -- to arrange a hit on Wallace, and that the gunman was a hitman and mortgage broker named Amir Muhammad. Sullivan further argued that when it became clear how many corrupt LAPD officers were involved with Death Row Records, the department hushed up as much as it could and all but abandoned detective Russell Poole's investigation recommendations.

Documentary filmmaker Nick Broomfield used Labyrinth as a basis for 2002's Biggie and Tupac, which featured interviews with Poole and Knight, among others. In April 2002, Faith Evans and Voletta Wallace (Biggie's mother) filed a civil suit against the LAPD alleging wrongful death, among other charges. In September of that year, the Los Angeles Times published a report alleging that the Notorious B.I.G. had paid members of the Crips one million dollars to murder 2Pac, and even supplied the gun used. Several of Biggie's relatives and friends stepped forward to say that the rapper had been recording in New Jersey, not masterminding a hit in Las Vegas; the report was also roundly criticized in the hip-hop community, which was anxious to avoid reopening old wounds. Outside legal matters, the B.I.G. legacy continued to be burnished with the 2007 compilation Greatest Hits, the 2009 biopic Notorious, and 2017's The King & I. The third posthumous duets album, The King & I was co-credited to Evans, whose new vocals were combined with a mix of familiar and previously unreleased verses from Biggie.


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The album that reinvented East Coast rap for the gangsta age, Ready to Die made the Notorious B.I.G. a star, and vaulted Sean "Puffy" Combs' Bad Boy label into the spotlight as well. Today it's recognized as one of the greatest hardcore rap albums ever recorded, and that's mostly due to Biggie's skill as a storyteller. His raps are easy to understand, but his skills are hardly lacking -- he has a loose, easy flow and a talent for piling multiple rhymes on top of one another in quick succession. He's blessed with a flair for the dramatic, and slips in and out of different contradictory characters with ease. Yet, no matter how much he heightens things for effect, it's always easy to see elements of Biggie in his narrators and of his own experience in the details; everything is firmly rooted in reality, but plays like scenes from a movie. A sense of doom pervades his most involved stories: fierce bandits ("Gimme the Loot"), a hustler's beloved girlfriend ("Me & My Bitch"), and robbers out for Biggie's newfound riches ("Warning") all die in hails of gunfire. The album is also sprinkled with reflections on the soul-draining bleakness of the streets -- "Things Done Changed," "Ready to Die," and "Everyday Struggle" are powerfully affecting in their confusion and despair. Not everything is so dark, though; Combs' production collaborations result in some upbeat, commercial moments, and typically cop from recognizable hits: the Jackson 5's "I Want You Back" on the graphic sex rap "One More Chance," Mtume's "Juicy Fruit" on the rags-to-riches chronicle "Juicy," and the Isley Brothers' "Between the Sheets" on the overweight-lover anthem "Big Poppa." Producer Easy Mo Bee's deliberate beats do get a little samey, but it hardly matters: this is Biggie's show, and by the time "Suicidal Thoughts" closes the album on a heartbreaking note, it's clear why he was so revered even prior to his death.



 The Notorious B.I.G. - Ready To Die The Remaster  (flac   495mb)


01 Intro 3:24
02 Things Done Changed 3:57
03 Gimme The Loot 5:04
04 Machine Gun Funk 4:16
05 Warning 3:40
06 Ready To Die 4:24
07 One More Chance 4:43
08 #!*@ Me (Interlude) 1:31
09 The What 3:57
10 Juicy 5:03
11 Everyday Struggle 5:19
12 Me & My Bitch 4:00
13 Big Poppa 4:13
14 Respect 5:22
15 Friend Of Mine 3:28
16 Unbelievable 3:43
17 Suicidal Thoughts 2:54
18 Who Shot Ya5:19
19 Just Playing (Dreams) 2:43

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It may have taken the Notorious B.I.G. a few years to follow up his milestone debut, Ready to Die (1994), with another album, but when he did return with Life After Death in 1997, he did so in a huge way. The ambitious album, intended as somewhat of a sequel to Ready to Die, picking up where its predecessor left off, sprawled across the span of two discs, each filled with music, 24 songs in all. You'd expect any album this sprawling to include some lackluster filler. That's not really the case with Life After Death, however. Like 2Pac's All Eyez on Me from a year before, an obvious influence, Biggie's album made extensive use of various producers -- DJ Premier, Easy Mo Bee, Clark Kent, RZA, and more of New York's finest -- resulting in a diverse, eclectic array of songs. Plus, Biggie similarly brought in various guest rappers -- Jay-Z, Lil' Kim, Bone Thugs, Too $hort, L.O.X., Mase -- a few vocalists -- R. Kelly, Angela Winbush, 112 -- and, of course, Puff Daddy, who is much more omnipresent here than on Ready to Die, where he mostly remained on the sidelines. It's perhaps Puffy himself to thank for this album's biggest hits: "Mo Money Mo Problems," "Hypnotize," "Sky's the Limit," three songs that definitely owe much to his pop touch. There's still plenty of the gangsta tales on Life After Death that won Biggie so much admiration on the streets, but it's the pop-laced songs that stand out as highlights. In hindsight, Biggie couldn't have ended his career with a more fitting album than Life After Death. Over the course of only two albums, he achieved every success imaginable, perhaps none greater than this unabashedly over-reaching success. Ready to Die is a milestone album, for sure, but it's nowhere near as extravagant or epic as Life After Death.



The Notorious B.I.G. - Life After Death  (flac   333mb)

101 Life After Death Intro 1:40
102 Somebody's Gotta Die 4:27
103 Hypnotize 3:50
104 Kick In The Door 4:46
105 #!*@ You Tonight 5:46
106 Last Day 4:20
107 I Love The Dough 5:12
108 What's Beef? 5:15
109 B.I.G. Interlude 0:48
110 Mo Money Mo Problems 4:17
111 Niggas Bleed 4:51
112 I Got A Story To Tell 4:43


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The Notorious B.I.G. - Life After Death 2 (flac   397mb)

201 Notorious Thugs 6:08
202 Miss U 4:59
203 Another 4:15
204 Going Back To Cali 5:07
205 Ten Crack Commandments 3:24
206 Playa Hater 3:58
207 Nasty Boy 5:34
208 Sky's The Limit 5:29
209 The World Is Filled...4:55
210 My Downfall 5:27
211 Long Kiss Goodnight 5:18
212 You're Nobody (Til Somebody Kills You) 4:53


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Considering it was released almost three years after his death, it'd be easy to dismiss the Notorious B.I.G.'s third album as a cash-in or merely a tribute album, similar to Puff Daddy's No Way Out. Fact is, Born Again includes a lot of previously unheard material from Biggie, and guest spots from Busta Rhymes, Redman and Method Man, Missy Elliott, Ice Cube, and Snoop Dogg work better than could be expected. It's difficult to say where all this material came from, but it's probable that the productions were simply arranged around old rhymes from Biggie himself. On most tracks, he takes a spotlight and then the guest rapper comes in. Thanks to executive producer Puff Daddy, it'd be easy to fool those not into hip-hop that Notorious B.I.G. was still alive. The outro, a spoken-word reminiscence by Voletta Wallace (his mother) is a bit touching but also a bit ghoulish. For B.I.G. fans, this is another must-have, but for anyone who thinks the rap industry routinely goes too far in pursuit of the almighty dollar, Born Again is yet further proof.



The Notorious B.I.G. - Born Again (flac   514mb)

01 Born Again (Intro) 1:28
02 Notorious B.I.G.. 3:11
03 Dead Wrong 4:57
04 Hope You Niggas Sleep 4:10
05 Dangerous MC's 5:15
06 Biggie 5:22
07 Niggas 3:48
08 Big Booty Hoes 3:27
09 Would You Die For Me 3:36
10 Come On 4:37
11 Rap Phenomenon 4:02
12 Let Me Get Down 4:33
13 Tonight 6:08
14 If I Should Die Before I Wake 4:51
15 Who Shot Ya 3:47
16 Can I Get Witcha 3:36
17 Really Want To Show You 5:09
18 Ms. Wallace (Outro) 3:20

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Junior Masters at Finding Intelligent Attitudes, or Junior M.A.F.I.A., were able to grab instant notoriety with two hit singles, "Get Money" and "Player's Anthem," thanks to their childhood crony and producer, the Notorious B.I.G. Their gold-certified debut album, Conspiracy (Undeas/Big Beat), was also released on Biggie's Undeas label in 1995. Hailing from Bedford-Stuyvesant, NY, the group was comprised of four separate acts: the 6s (Little Caesar, Chico, and Nino Brown), the Snakes (cousins Larceny and Trife), MC Klepto, and 47 MC Little Kim. Their rhymes mostly conveyed scenarios involving guns, money, and sex. The single "Get Money" was popular enough to help one of the group's members start a solo career. Lil' Kim, "the lieutenant" of Junior M.A.F.I.A., presented her own agenda and promiscuous persona, which some public figures protested, but fans concentrated on her skills as a rap artist. Her album Hard Core was released in 1996 and featured the hit singles "Crush on You," "Queen B@#$H," and "No Time" (which became a number one rap single). Biggie, Sean "Puffy" Combs, and Little Caesar contributed to the album as well. Soon after, Kim's popularity paved the way for guest raps on songs by artists such as Missy "Misdemeanor" Elliott, Mary J. Blige, and Sean "Puffy" Combs and appearances on the movie soundtracks Money Talks and High School High.

Under the guidance of the Notorious B.I.G., Junior M.A.F.I.A. released their first single, "Player's Anthem," in the summer of 1995, along with the full-length Conspiracy. Not surprisingly, the group's music resembles that of The Notorious B.I.G.'s Ready to Die, complete with an opening sound collage. Considering Ready to Die was one of the seminal hip-hop releases of the early '90s, Conspiracy could have been an inspired, enjoyable sequel; instead, it's a fitfully successful replication of the earlier record's strengths. The major problem is Junior M.A.F.I.A. doesn't have enough personality to distinguish themselves from the B.I.G., who appears on four of the album's songs. Little Kim, the group's only female, does bring things to life on occasion, but it isn't quite enough to save the entire album. Nevertheless, the Clark Kent-produced "Player's Anthem" is a classic single, riding on its rubbery bass and surprisingly warm sentiments. Although the Notorious B.I.G. contributes some killer rhymes to the song; he fits into the overall sound of the single, but he doesn't dominate. Instead, the true personalities of Junior M.A.F.I.A. shine through, and they are impressive.



 Junior M.A.F.I.A. - Conspiracy  (flac   290mb)


01 Intro 2:42
02 White Chalk 4:40
03 Excuse Me... 0:50
04 Realms Of Junior M.A.F.I.A. 4:25
05 Player's Anthem 5:22
06 I Need You Tonight 4:28
07 Get Money 4:34
08 I've Been... 0:35
09 Crazaay 3:58
10 Back Stabbers 5:34
11 Shot! 0:55
12 Lyrical Wizardry 3:52
13 Oh My Lord 3:39
14 Murder Onze 4:22
15 Outro 0:41

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