Sep 28, 2016

RhoDeo 1639 Aetix

Hello,

Today's artists are an an English ska band led by frontman Buster Bloodvessel. They were at their most popular during the early 1980s, during a period when other ska revival bands such as Madness, The Specials and The Selecter filled the charts. They spent 111 weeks in the UK Singles Chart between 1980 and 1983, and they also achieved chart success with their first four studio albums ....N'Joy

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Fronted by Buster Bloodvessel (born Douglas Trendle), the band was formed in 1976 while the members were together at Woodberry Down Comprehensive School near Manor House, North London. They commemorated the 1981 closure of the school on the back sleeve of their Gosh It's... The band, composed of vocalist Buster Bloodvessel (born Douglas Trendle), Louis Cook (guitar), David Farren (bass), Martin Stewart (keyboards), Brian Tuitti (drums), Gus Herman (trumpet), Chris Kane (saxophone), and Andrew Marson (saxophone), were one of the many bands to take their inspiration from the Specials and the ska revival movement in England in the late '70s.

After becoming popular in their native London, Bad Manners signed to Magnet Records in 1980, and became regular guests on television shows such as Tiswas. The band also appeared on The British Music Awards (1981) and Cheggers Plays Pop. In 1985, they also appeared on The Time of Your Life, hosted by Noel Edmonds. Being closely associated with the 2 Tone movement (though never signed to 2 Tone Records itself), they were one of six bands featured in the 1981 documentary film Dance Craze.

Some of their more notable hits include "My Girl Lollipop", "Lip Up Fatty", "Can Can", "Special Brew" and "Walking In The Sunshine". One of the main reasons for their notoriety, was their outlandish huge-tongued and shaven-headed frontman, Buster Bloodvessel. His manic exploits got them banned from the British BBC TV chart show Top of the Pops.[3] The band was also banned from Italian TV after Bloodvessel mooned a concert audience, after being told that the Pope was watching on TV.

Bad Manners left Magnet Records in 1983, and Telstar Records released a compilation album, The Height of Bad Manners, which reached number 23 in the UK Albums Chart. The album was assisted with a television advertisement promotion, and it brought the band back to the attention of the media and the British public - but no further chart hits.

The group then went on to sign a contract with Portrait Records in the United States and Mental Notes was released in 1985. For two years the band toured continuously all over the world but decided to disband in 1987.

Buster reformed the band with original members Louis Alphonso, Martin Stewart and Winston Bazoomies. Another original member, Chris Kane, also remained in the band, but left in 1990. In 1988, the band licensed the name and logo of Blue Beat Records, and set up office in a 50 ft barge in the back garden of Buster's former home in Spring Hill, London. After Blue Beat closed in 1990, Bad Manners were without a recording contract, but still continued to tour. In 1992, they signed a deal with Pork Pie Records and Fat Sound was released in Europe. The album was initially intended to be released in the UK on Blue Beat.

In 1996, Buster Bloodvessel moved to Margate, and opened a hotel on the seafront called Fatty Towers, which catered for people with huge appetites. While living in Margate, he was a regular spectator at Margate F.C., and Bad Manners sponsored the club for one season. Fatty Towers closed in 1998 and did not re-open despite a facelift. After its closure, he moved back to London. Bad Manners released Heavy Petting on Moon Ska Records in the United States in 1997. Six years later, Buster set up another record label and the band released Stupidity on Bad Records in 2003.

The band are currently in their 40th anniversary year, and can still be seen out touring regularly across the UK.

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The Manners paint their visions of cats,monsters,woolly textures etc from a far richer palette.The brass section on this peice is also superb.If John Coltrane was a skinhead into ska he would have begged to join Bad Manners.Buster Bloodvessel is the ska Biggy Smalls except unlike that fat naughty legend this one still has blood pumping through him.Mind you he has a similiar sense of fun but not quite as many tunes about crack.Ska n B is Van Goff for the ear.



Bad Manners - Ska 'N' B   (flac  366mb)

01 Ne-Ne Na-Na Na-Na Nu-Nu 2:30
02 Here Comes The Major 2:53
03 Fatty Fatty 2:46
04 King Ska/Fa 4:43
05 Monster Mash 3:00
06 Caledonia 2:58
07 Magnificent 7 2:32
08 Wooly Bully 3:09
09 Lip Up Fatty 2:46
10 Special Brew 3:36
11 Inner London Violence 3:59
12 Scruffy The Huffy Chuffy Tug Boat 1:39
13 Holidays 2:12
14 Night Bus To Dalston (Instrumental Version) 2:18
15 Lip Up Fatty (12" Extended Mix) 4:42
16 Special Brew (Single Version) 3:19
17 Ivor The Engine 2:27

Bad Manners - Ska 'N' B   (ogg  135mb)

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Bad Manners' sophomore release pretty much follows the blueprint of their debut release Ska'n'B, in that it's fun original pop ska, with a few cover tunes and boisterous instrumentals. The remastered sound is awesome and 2 bonus tracks not on the original LP, have been aded. Wonderful, cheerful driving music.



Bad Manners - Loonee Tunes!   (flac 289mb)

01 Echo Four-Two 2:43
02 Just A Feeling 3:13
03 El Pussycat 2:30
04 Doris 2:48
05 Spy I 4:05
06 Tequila 2:12
07 Lorraine 3:15
08 Echo Gone Wrong 4:21
09 Suicide 3:04
10 The Undersea Adventures Of Ivor The Engine 2:25
11 Back In '60 2:34
12 Just Pretendin' 3:05
Bonus
13 Lorraine (Extended 12" Version) 6:20
14 Here Comes The Major (New Version) 3:23

Bad Manners - Loonee Tunes!   (ogg  111mb)

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Digitally re-mastered and expanded edition of the British Ska band's 1981 album including bonus tracks. This, their third album overall, was the bands' most successful full-length, reaching #18 in the UK charts. The album contains a fascinating mixture of styles, from the quality writing & musicianship of songs such as "Walking in the Sunshine" & "Casablanca" to the experimental, slightly leftfield "Gherkin", to the great fun tracks like "Can Can" & "Ben E. Wriggle". What you get is an amazingly diverse record that should have sold by the bucket load. BM were always perceived as a singles band, although this was the bands most successful record, it only peaked at 18 in the UK album charts. So if a fan of ska, then this album is an integral part of that scene. Amongst the six bonus tracks is the #34 hit single 'Buona Sera' plus many rare, previously non-LP B-sides making their debut on this album.



Bad Manners - Gosh It's (flac 401mb)

01 Walking In The Sunshine 3:26
02 Dansetta 3:53
03 Can Can 2:55
04 Weeping And Wailing 3:37
05 Casablanca (Rags And Riches) 4:48
06 Don't Be Angry 2:30
07 Ben E. Wriggle 3:48
08 Runaway 3:06
09 Never Will Change 3:04
10 Only Funkin' 3:32
11 End Of The World 2:57
12 Gherkin 4:36
Bonus
13 Armchair Disco 3;12
14 Night Bus To Dalston (Vocal Version) 2:14
15 Buona Sera 2:50
16 The New One 1:05
17 No Respect 1:58
18 Walking In The Sunshine (Ext 12" Version) 5:33

Bad Manners - Gosh It's  (ogg  141mb)

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Forging Ahead shows the band in peak form for the last time as the ska-revival was losing momentum. Includes the hit cover of Millie's (retitled) classic "My Girl Lollipop." Bad Manners were the pioneers of Ska/New wave/Zaniness and probably a few other categories that I missed. For fun, you can't beat this puppy! The Cossack-sounding That Will Do Nicely opens up the album, with the fun & echoey Salad Bar next. Tonight is Your Night is a great sing along while Sampson & Delilah & Exodus are great!My Girl Lollipop might have been done before, and recived the radio play, but remains my favorite, none-the-less.The Cd then goes into some hummable tracks, including the nutty remake of Van Morrisons Whats Up Crazy Pup! It may seem to you like I reviewed just about every song, and you'd be right! It's just that good. Listen to it yourself !



Bad Manners - Forging Ahead (flac 453mb)

01 That'll Do Nicely 2:52
02 Salad Bar 2:51
03 Tonight Is Your Night 3:25
04 Samson and Delilah 5:18
05 Exodus 2:45
06 Got No Brains 3:48
07 My Girl Lollipop 4:59
08 Falling Out of Love 3:23
09 Seventh Heaven 3:28
10 Educating Marmalade 3:16
11 What's up Crazy Pup 1:56
12 Your 3:49

Bad Manners - Forging Ahead   (ogg  99mb)

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Sep 27, 2016

RhoDeo 1639 Roots

Hello,  well the debate just ended and Trump managed to ignore every serious question and Clinton failed to pounce him on it. What so many americans see in Trump beats me. Clinton could have scored with him not paying income tax or even his bills. Then his waffling about 5 trillion dollars kept outside the US because of burocracy right that's an euphemism for taxes that these multinationals owe on that cashpile but hey let's give these crooks more is Donald's big idea. I'm no fan of Hillary and she clearly is a person that's inclined to take on too much on her plate. She's like a plate spinner and inevitably some plates will crash but hey you'd rather watch Trump spin the one golden plate with his name on it ?...


The music of Brazil encompasses various regional music styles influenced by African, European and Amerindian forms. After 500 years of history, Brazilian music developed some unique and original styles such as samba, bossa nova, MPB, sertanejo, pagode, tropicalia, choro, maracatu, embolada (coco de repente), mangue bit, funk carioca (in Brazil simply known as Funk), frevo, forró, axé, brega, lambada, and Brazilian versions of foreign musical genres, such as Brazilian rock and rap.


Today an international singing superstar and songwriter, he may have his roots in Brazil, but his songs have touched audiences all over the world. Born in Rio, his adoptve parents, both white, brought him to Tres Pontas, a small town in the state of Minas Gerais, when he was two. He began singing as a teenager. When he was 19, he moved to the capital Belo Horizonte and began singing wherever and whenever he could. Finally he caught a break when the pop singer Elis Regina recorded one of his songs, "Canção do Sal," in 1966. Regina got him a showcase on a popular Brazilian TV program, and after performing at Brazil's International Song Festival the following year, his career was launched. ........N'Joy

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Milton Nascimento born October 26, 1942, Rio de Janeiro his mother, Maria Nascimento, was a maid. As a baby, Milton Nascimento was adopted by a couple who were his mother's former employers; Josino Brito Campos, a bank employee, mathematics teacher and electronic technician and Lília Silva Campos, a music teacher and choir singer. When he was 18 months old, Nascimento's biological mother died, and he moved with his adopted parents to the city of Três Pontas, in the state of Minas Gerais. Nascimento was an occasional DJ on a radio station that his father once ran. He lived in the boroughs of Laranjeiras and Tijuca in Rio de Janeiro.

In the early stages of his career, Nascimento played in two samba groups, Evolussamba and Sambacana. In 1963, he moved to Belo Horizonte, where his friendship with Lô Borges led to the Clube da Esquina ("corner club") movement. Members included Beto Guedes, Toninho Horta, Wagner Tiso, and Flávio Venturini, with whom he shared compositions and melodies.

Nascimento is famous for his falsetto and tonal range, as well for highly acclaimed songs such as "Maria, Maria", "Canção da América" ("Song from America"/"Unencounter"), "Travessia" ("Bridges"), "Bailes da Vida", and "Coração de Estudante" ("Student's Heart"). The lyrics remember the funeral of the student Edson Luís, killed by police officers in 1968. The song became the hymn for the Diretas Já social-political campaign in 1984, was played at the funeral of the late President of Brazil Tancredo Neves the next year, and was also played at Ayrton Senna's funeral.

In 1972 he collaborated with fellow lyricists Márcio Borges, Fernando Brant, Ronaldo Bastos, and other friends to record Clube da Esquina, a double album that spurred three hit singles, including "Cais (Dock)" and "Cravo é Canela (Clove and Cinnamon)." The singles are still being recorded and have become standards in Brazil over the years. Since he began recording with his self-titled debut in 1967 for the Codil label, Nascimento has written and recorded 28 albums.

O Planeta Blue Na Estrada do SolNascimento's many achievements include Grammy nominations for his O Planeta Blue na Estrada do Sol in 1992, and in 1995 for his Warner Bros. debut, Angelus. Nascimento is also winner of the 1992 Down Beat International Critics' Poll and the 1991 Down Beat Readers' Poll. Nascimento has toured throughout the U.S., Europe, Japan, and Latin America.His lengthy discography includes Courage, a 1969 album for A&M and Milton Nascimento that same year for EMI Odeon; Milton, also for the EMI Odeon label, recorded in 1970, and then four more albums for the label EMI Odeon: Clube da Esquina (1972), Milagre dos Peixes (1973), Milagre dos Peixes (Ao Vivo) (1973), and Minas (1975).

His other titles include Native Dancer (CBS, 1976), Geraes (EMI Odeon, 1976), Milton (A&M, 1977), Clube da Esquina 2 (EMI Odeon, 1978), A Brazilian Love Affair, a collaboration with George Duke (CBS Records, 1980), Journey to Dawn (A&M Records, 1979), and a series of five albums for Ariola: Sentinela (1980), Cacador de Mim (1981), Missa dos Quilombos (1982), Anima (1982), and Milton Nascimento ao Vivo (1983).

His output through the rest of the 1980s and '90s has been steady and reliable, though never musically predictable. Like any true jazz and pop veteran, Nascimento has a deep need to keep challenging himself, vocally, lyrically, and stylistically. Nascimento's other releases include Encontros e Despedidas for Barclay in 1985, Corazon Americano for PolyGram in 1986, A Barca dos Amantes for Barclay in 1986, Milton/RPM for Epic/CBS in 1987, Yauaretê for CBS in 1987, Miltons in 1988 for CBS, Txai for the same label in 1990, and O Planeta Blue na Estrada do Sol for CBS in 1991.

Amigo In the mid-'90s, Nascimento switched to Warner Bros. He released two excellent, readily available albums for the label, Angelus, his 27th recording, in 1995, Amigo in 1996, Nascimento in 1997, and Crooner in 1999. He returned after a short hiatus in 2003 with Pieta, followed by The Essential Collection: The Best of the EMI Odeon Years (1969-78) in 2006.

This charismatic Brazilian superstar just won't slow down any time soon, and whether he's packing a stadium in Brazil or singing at a club in New York, his experienced stage persona allows everyone in the audience to feel as if they're in his living room. On Angelus, he's joined by saxophonist Wayne Shorter, who pays tribute to Nascimento's 1975 Native Dancer LP, the high point of which was the synthesis between Nascimento's voice and Shorter's saxophone. That album helped to solidify Nascimento's place on the international jazz and pop scene in the 1970s. Whatever he writes and sings about, be it the planet, ways of living, and loving and dying, his music has always carried an eternally optimistic spirit. As he entered the millennium, Nascimento won a Grammy for Best Contemporary Pop Album for 1999's Crooner at the first annual Latin Grammy Awards in fall 2000.

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Geraes was recorded in 1976. At this point, Nascimento had had an experience with fusion in the Som Imaginário, and with jazzers such as Herbie Hancock (who had recorded with him in the previous year's Milton) and Wayne Shorter (Native Dancer). For this album, Nascimento experiments economically with orchestra, trying to recover his roots -- the culture of the Minas Gerais state, whose already strong civilization made possible an expressive Baroque and sacred music in the 17th century. Therefore, the atmosphere here is not as swinging, but it reaches deeper emotional dimensions in some hits, like the bucolic "Fazenda," the religious folkloric "Calix Bento," the Latin "Volver a los 17," the fundamental "O Cio da Terra," and others. The album also has special guest Chico Buarque on his "O Que Será (À Flor da Pele)."



Milton Nascimento - Geraes  (flac  254mb)

01 Fazenda 2:40
02 Calix Bento 3:30
03 Volver A Los 17 5:10
04 Menino 2:47
05 O Que Será (À Flor Da Pele) 4:10
06 Carro De Boi 3:40
07 Caldera 4:25
08 Promessas De Sol 5:00
09 Viver De Amor 2:34
10 Lua Girou 3:42
11 Circo Marimbondo 2:55
12 Minas Geraes 5:13

 Milton Nascimento - Geraes    (ogg  107mb)

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An elaborately produced piece of vinyl, Journey to Dawn was, alas, the result of yet another campaign to prematurely place Nascimento into the U.S. market in a big way. The cosmopolitan tropicalismo movement continued to leave its mark on Nascimento, placing the bossa nova on the back burner and replacing it with an urgency often generated by four-square rock rhythms and electric guitars, percussive sounds from the Brazilian jungle, and some orchestrations from California. Nascimento remains a mesmerizing performer in the studio with his manly baritone and keening falsetto, and there are plenty of memorable compositions -- including the hypnotic "Paula and Bebeto," which harkens a bit back to '60s bossa nova, the fascinating "Maria Tres Filhos," and the "Pablo" suite, which has some of the wild carnival atmosphere within it. Unfortunately, it was all too exotic for American audiences in the disco days (the lack of English-translated lyrics didn't help), so back went Nascimento to merely being a superstar in Brazil.



Milton Nascimento - Journey To Dawn   (flac  205mb)

01 Pablo II, Pablo, Pablo II 4:45
02 Idolatrada 4:41
03 Unencounter 2:49
04 Maria Maria 3:08
05 Journey To Dawn 3:22
06 O Cio Da Terra 3:32
07 Paula & Bebeto 3:27
08 Maria Tres Filhos 2:34
09 Credo 3:37
10 Alouca 3:20

Milton Nascimento - Journey To Dawn    (ogg  85mb)

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This is a reissue of the original 1980 release, the first for Polygram after Milton Nascimento had left EMI. The album had the fundamental support of the melodic percussion of the Minas Gerais group Uakti, along with the usual robust orchestrations. Nascimento had a hit with "Canção da América," but several songs must be mentioned for their strong melodic qualities, like the folklore-tinged "Peixinhos do Mar," "Sueño Con Serpientes" (with Mercedes Sosa), Villa-Lobos' "Cantiga," and "Sentinela" (with singer Nana Caymmi showcasing her strong, personal voice timbre similar to Nascimento's, which serves wonderfully to convey the idea of religious devotion).



Milton Nascimento - Sentinela   (flac 240mb)

01 O Velho 0:36
02 Peixinhos Do Mar 3:34
03 Tudo 4:03
04 Canção Da América 3:52
05 Sueño Con Serpientes 4:41
06 Roupa Nova 2:58
07 Povo Da Raça Brasil 0:20
08 Sentinela 7:30
09 Cantiga (Caicó) Tema Folclórico 2:58
10 Bicho Homem 1:30
11 Itamarandiba 3:12
12 Um Cafuné Na Cabeça, Malandro, Eu Quero Até De Macaco 3:39
13 Peixinhos Do Mar 0:20

Milton Nascimento - Sentinela      (ogg 92mb)

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By the mid-'80s, PolyGram decided that the time had come for Milton Nascimento to become a big North American star -- indeed, he had not even performed in America at all until 1985 -- so they took his then-current release from its Brazilian affiliate and gave it a full-court press. The vehicle is a fairly uneven record for Nascimento, one heavily decorated by Wagner Tiso's digital synthesizers, loaded with Nascimento's exhortations for brotherhood and happiness yet not that well-stocked with memorable tunes. Nascimento takes on apartheid on "Lagrima Do Sul" with the help of Uakti's collection of exotic marimbas, and in one guilelessly autobiographical song, "Quem Perguntou Por Mim" ("Who Asked for Me"), he even acknowledges his role as Brazil's voice to the world. The moody instrumental "Vidro e Corte" finds Pat Metheny -- a longtime admirer of Nascimento -- taking the lead, but "Raca," with Steve Slagle's lightweight alto up front, is clearly aimed at American fuzak tastes. Although not one of Nascimento's best, the album did establish a foothold for him at last beyond the obscure import racks in North America and he has remained a presence there ever since. [The CD version contains an extra track.]



Nascimento - Encontros e Despedidas (flac 222mb)

01 Portal Da Cor (Threshold Of Colours) 4:09
02 Caso De Amor (Love Affair) 3:20
03 Noites Do Sertão (Country Nights) 2:34
04 Mar Do Nosso Amor (Sea Of Our Love) 3:21
05 Lágrimas Do Sul (Southern Tear) 3:40
06 Raça (Race) 2:49
07 Para Eu Parar De Me Doer (So I Can Stop Feeling Hurt) 3:03
08 Encontros E Despedidas (Meetings And Farewells) 3:35
09 Quem Perguntou Por Mim (Who Asked For Me) 3:52
10 A Primeira Estrela (The Morning Star) 5:02
11 Vidro E Corte (Glass And Cut) 4:40
12 Radio Experiência (Radio Experience) 2:45

Nascimento - Encontros e Despedidas  (ogg  107mb)

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Sep 26, 2016

RhoDeo Young 1's 9th

Hello,


Today the 9th episode of an 'historical' 12-episode dramatization of student life in early eighties UK, hooliganism had not made the headlights yet, but dare i say it quickly followed after this series was broadcast. Inspiring clueless chaos ..N'Joy

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The Young Ones is a British "variety" show, broadcast in the United Kingdom from 1982 to 1984 in two six-part series. Shown on BBC2, it featured anarchic, offbeat humour which helped bring alternative comedy to television in the 1980s and made household names of its writers and performers. In 1985, it was shown on MTV, one of the first non-music television shows on the fledgling channel. In a 2004 poll, it ranked at number 31 in the BBC's list of Britain's Best Sitcoms.

The main characters were four undergraduate students who were sharing a house: aggressive punk Vyvyan (Adrian Edmondson), conceited wannabe anarchist Rick (Rik Mayall), oppressed paranoid hippie Neil (Nigel Planer), and the suave, charming Mike (Christopher Ryan). It also featured Alexei Sayle, who played various members of the Balowski family—most often Jerzei Balowski, the quartet's landlord—and occasional independent characters, such as the train driver in "Bambi" and the Mussolini-lookalike Police Chief in "Cash". Stories were set in a squalid house where the students lived during their time at Scumbag College.

The show combined traditional sitcom style with violent slapstick, non-sequitur plot turns, and surrealism. Every episode except one featured a live performance by a band, including Madness, Motörhead, and The Damned. This was a device used to qualify the series for a larger budget, as "variety" shows attracted higher fees than "comedy"

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with

Adrian Edmondson - Vyvyan...
Rik Mayall - Rick...
Nigel Planer - Neil
Christopher Ryan - Mike
Alexei Sayle - The Balowski Family...


The Young Ones 09 Nasty (mp4  283mb)

09 Nasty 34:56

A strange package from South Africa interferes with the boys' plans to watch a video nasty on a rented VCR, Mike and Vyvan try to get their video player working as they are plan to watch video nasties, Neil has a bath and Vyvan, Rick, Mike and Neil are terrorized by a vampire. with The Damned performing Nasty

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Previously

The Young Ones 01 Demolition (mp4  266mb)
The Young Ones 02 Oil (mp4  264mb)
The Young Ones 03 Bored (mp4  284mb)
The Young Ones 04 Bomb (mp4  285mb)
The Young Ones 05 Intresting (mp4  258mb)
The Young Ones 06 Flood (mp4  247mb)
The Young Ones 07 Bambi (mp4  282mb)
The Young Ones 08 Cash (mp4  275mb)

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Sep 25, 2016

Sundaze 1639

Hello, the 4th post on Muslimgauze and though i'm not even halfway thru my Muslimgauze collection, for the moment i'll halt the posting, remind me in 6 months or so. I just want to keep the Sundaze surprising.....

About today's artist, a music project of Bryn Jones (17 June 1961 – 14 January 1999), a British ethnic electronica and experimental musician who was influenced by conflicts in the Muslim world, with an emphasis on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. With dozens of albums released under the Muslimgauze name, Jones was prolific, but his mainstream success was limited due in part to his work being issued mostly in limited editions on small record labels. His music was described by one critic as "among the most startling and unique in the noise underground."... N'Joy

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Jones first released music in 1982 as E.g Oblique Graph on Kinematograph, his own imprint, and the independent co-op label Recloose, run by Simon Crab. E.g Oblique Graph came from the do-it-yourself (DIY) ethos of the time and was musically composed of electronic/experimental drone with occasional synth-melodic hooks and use of radio broadcast samples. Track titles were sometimes politicised such as "Murders linked to Gaullist Clique" on Extended Play (1982) and "Castro Regime" on Triptych (1982).

After operation Peace of the Galilee, the first Muslimgauze album, Hammer & Sickle (1983) appeared on another of Jones's label monikers, Hessian. Under the Muslimgauze alias, music switched from emphasis on pure synthesis to percussion textures, which grew to encompass acoustic drum kits, drum machines, assorted ethnic hand percussion, and even rudimentary objects like pots and pans. Synthesis and tape loop samples were often relegated to accompaniment.

Releases at the time were occasionally on cassette, more often vinyl EPs and LPs; the longest running of Jones' label monikers, Limited Editions, started with Hunting Out with an Aerial Eye (1984) followed by Buddhist on Fire, put out by Recloose the same year. Since then, Jones roughly released an album a year, given scarce financial resources until 1988, when he began making inroads with then-emerging labels Staalplaat, Soleilmoon, and Extreme Records. In 1988, Staalplaat released the first Muslimgauze CD, Iran, the subsequent catalogue migrated to mostly that format.

By the late 1980s, Jones ran out of funding to self release, and other labels that did put out Muslimgauze releases such as Recloose and Permis De Construire (which put out Coup D'État) did not pay promised royalties. Recloose head Simon Crab cited lack of sales and damaged records from fire bombing as his reason.

The neighbouring Thomas a Becket pub run by East End gangsters—common-or-garden low-level vicious thugs (years before the species was romanticized by Lock Stock and Mona Lisa)—unable to control our unlicensed trade in alcohol and other illicits, firebombed the building one night and attacked the crew on a regular basis (ironically, many of the new pressings of Muslimgauze's Buddhist on Fire stored in the Recloose offices were destroyed during this attack).

The deal with Recloose was that we paid 50 percent of the profits to the artist and 50 percent went to the label, which was a pretty good deal, especially since we didn't sell that much. We put a lot of energy into marketing, and most of the artists signed to the label sold off the back of Bourbonese Qualk anyway. He assumed we sold loads of albums but we didn't even cover the costs.

At this time distributors Soleilmoon, Staalplaat, and Extreme Records transitioned to a label proper with the advent of the compact disc format, which became less expensive to produce and ship than vinyl over time and gradually took on the Muslimgauze catalogue. After a positive experience with the release of Intifaxa (1990) with Extreme, Jones remained with the label until his final release with it, Citadel, in 1994.

It was with the release of United States of Islam (1991) a formalised agreement was reached with Extreme Records, which helped fund professional studio recordings, designed attractive packaging, and used a more extensive distribution network. Though pleased at first, Jones was frustrated with Extreme's one-release-a-year policy and in 1993 signed with then-sibling labels Soleilmoon and Staalplaat, which offered a more frequent release schedule. 1993 saw the release of Vote Hezbollah, Veiled Sisters and a re-release of Iran on Soleilmoon and Hamas Arc, Satyajit Eye and Betrayal on Staalplaat.

As someone who always had more musical supply than demand[according to whom?], Jones additionally released material on nearly any small label that approached him, including Parade Amoureuse, Minus Habens Records, Concrete Productions, Daft, and Jara. A drawback with releasing on so many labels was gratuitous editing by producers and, through design or circumstance, no royalties. Extreme cited betrayal by distribution networks that were unscrupulous or filed for bankruptcy and could not pay—though they also claimed to have eventually remunerated Jones. Lack of due royalties was a source of ongoing stress throughout Jones's career.

In 1995, he had six releases; in 1996, 15; in 1997, nine; in 1998, 16. After his death, the many record companies with which he had associated released unreleased material and re-pressed older, out-of-print material. In 1999, the year of his death, 22 new (and old) albums and EPs on several media were released.

As frequency of releases increased, Jones was able to musically respond to events in the Muslim world as they occurred. Cases in point were the 1993 Oslo Accords, which surfaced as Betrayal and 1994's Hebron Massacre (also known as the Cave of the Patriarchs massacre) released under the same name just months after the tragedy.

Toward the end of his life, Jones involved himself in more collaborative efforts in projects like the Rootsman, Apollon, and Systemwide. Jones also made arrangements to release with other labels in addition to his mainstays (something done throughout his career, more so toward the end) such as D.O.R., Third Eye, BSI, Klanggalerie, and DAFT. In addition, the frequency of live shows increased, some recorded such as at on Air West in Japan, Mort Aux Vaches for VPRO Dutch Radio, and aboard the ship, the Stubnitz. It seemed no combination of labels, collaborations, or live performances could exhaust his musical output. Media scrutiny increased too (albeit mostly on independent publications) with a total of eight interviews in 1998.

He always stated that he never had time to listen to other people's music, although in a 1992 interview with Impulse Magazine, he mentioned that he enjoyed traditional music of Japan, the Middle East, and India, as well as the works of artists such as Can, Throbbing Gristle, Wire, and Faust. However, despite a few collaborations, Jones didn't trust anyone when it came to remixing his music. Instead, he took pieces of music sent to him and remixed them to his own liking. On Wednesday, 30 December 1998, Bryn was rushed to the hospital in Manchester with a rare fungal infection in his bloodstream, for which he had to be heavily sedated. His body eventually shut down, and he died on 14 January 1999.

Jones claimed Muslimgauze was formed in response to Operation Peace of the Galilee, Israel's 1982 invasion of Lebanon to stem attacks from Palestinian Liberation Organization guerrillas stationed in South Lebanon. This event inspired Jones to research the conflict's origins, which grew into a lifelong artistic focal point, and he became a staunch supporter of the Palestinian cause, and often dedicated recordings to the Palestinian Liberation Organization or a free Palestine. Jones's research further grew to encompass other conflict-ridden, predominantly Muslim countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Chechnya, Iran, and Iraq. He concluded that Western interests for natural resources and strategic-political gain were root causes for many of these conflicts and should Western meddling halt, said regions would stabilise.

When asked what he would do if conflicts in the Muslim world were peaceably resolved, Jones replied his music would champion other conflict regions such as China's occupation of Tibet. He also admitted Muslimgauze music could be appreciated outside a political context as the majority of it is instrumental; politicised only by track and album titles as well as occasional newscast and ethnic music samples. It was his hope that listeners would read album and track title references and verify for themselves the meanings through independent research and thought.

The name Muslimgauze is a play on the word muslin (a type of gauze) combined with Muslim, referring to Bryn Jones' preoccupation with conflicts throughout the Muslim world..

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Tandoori Dog is a 4x12" vinyl box set by Muslimgauze. Part of the subscription series. Hand numbered limited edition of 300. Contains an insert with information about the subscription and the copy number. Each LP has its own title and vinyl color: Tandoori Dog (red), Jaagheed Zarb (black), Libya Tour Guide (green) and Jerusalaam (blue).

In 1998 Staalplaat and Muslimgauze were on a conquering spirit. Bryn Jones (1961-1999), the man behind Muslimgauze delivered new works, almost on a weekly basis and was more than happy to see them released straight away. Unlike others, Staalplaat was never shy to release larger works, lumping various works together, such as the 9CD “Box Of Silk & Dogs”. Allowing free reign in editing, the 4LP box set ‘Tandoori Dog”, contained the LP of the same name, Muslimgauze didn’t fail in this highly productive period. Peaking as never before, his music here carries all that makes Muslimgauze the unique artist he is. Taking his influences from what can be loosely called the Middle East, but extending that to as far as Pakistan, Jones samples freely percussion, instruments and voices and adds these to his own sequences and instruments, such as the tabla. The melting pot that is the studio blends this together, in hypnotic pieces of music. Captivating, minimal, groovy, but rather than being slick and commercial, this is the roughly shaped electronic world of Bryn Jones. All of this motivated and inspired by events in the Middle East, as reflected through the titles Jones picked for his work. A strong pre-occupation with the fate of the occupied people in the Palestinian lands and an unashamed love for such controversial groups as Hezbollah.



Muslimgauze - Tandoori Dog  (flac  166mb)

01 Aurum Franc Insense Ul Myrrh 5:58
02 Girl Who Lived Inside A Sitar 3:43
03 Invisable Hands Of Revenge 3:40
04 Low On Qat 2:30
05 Turkish Cypriot 4:49
06 Under The Burka 3:47
07 Correct Use Of Sharia 3:20
08 Salt Caravan 2:24

     (ogg  mb)

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Jaagheed Zarb introducrs almost funky hip-hop beats, interspersed with vocal snippets, and on the first track a static-y loop and eerie nay (a Middle Eastern flute) whispering through it all. In case you forgot about his signature terrifying low-end, it permeates both albums in abundance, especially on the minimal bowel-rumbling "Fazal Mahmood on Juke," the Prodigy on a broken spring track "Turn Left for Jabaliya," and amid the laidback, rhythmic assassin, call-to-arms "Iranian Silkworm." A few more surprises lurk on this album including the space at the end of "Fazal Mahmood" -- escaping from the tape hiss is a tinny, straightforward bazaar jam, as if recorded through a boombox in a crowded market -- and the last part of "Hafeez Kardar," where extended seconds of radio fuzz oscillate from subtle noise to crystallized tabla and percussion, filtering through like sand. It skitters into the last track, electronics gobbed onto background noise and monolithic electronics.

Muslimgauze - Jaagheed Zarb  (flac  305mb)

01 Jaagheed Zarb 6:35
02 Fazal Mahmood On Jute 5:11
03 Sari Of Human Hair 5:28
04 Iranian Silkworm 3:49
05 Turn Right For Jabaliya 3:25
06 Sari Of Dog Hair 4:35
07 Zingiber 3:24
08 Vinoo Mankad Option 8:39
09 Hafeez Kardar 7:54  

Muslimgauze - Jaagheed Zarb    (ogg  138mb)

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Libya Tour Guide is most notable for featuring some of the most prominent use of Roland 303 acid baselines in Muslimgauze’s peerless oeuvre, as much as its fractal diversity and atmospheric range explored over 19 tracks. As with most of his other equipment, it’s almost a given that Bryn Jones would use the 303 uniquely, and we’d wager you’ve rarely, if ever, heard it wrenched quite like he does in the parched bogle of Tubrug Sand Bank or paired with acoustic strings in Benzedrine Effendi and rubbed all over saz and bouncing drums in the opener, Lalique Gadaffi Jar. If you’ve got anything approaching a taste for Muslimgauze gear, this one is a total no brainer.


Muslimgauze - Libya Tour Guide  (flac  286mb)

01 Lalique Gadaffi Jar 4:18
02 Mouth Piece Of... 0:47
03 Benghazi Hotel 1:08
04 Gadaffi Inc. 1:49
05 Green Book 1:34
06 Saef Edge 2:46
07 Marzuq 2:38
08 Moving Further In Land 2:34
09 Ag Sidrah 0:40
10 Benzedrine, Effendi 3:16
11 No, Benzedrine, Effendi 1:44
12 Tarabulus 2:24
13 East Of Tarabulus 4:28
14 A Guard Of Females 3:12
15 Great Satan Shadow 4:22
16 Down Chad 1:32
17 Eyes Of... 2:25
18 Kurnel 4:48
19 Goodbye And Never Come Back 2:09

Muslimgauze - Libya Tour Guide   (ogg  131mb)

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Jerusalaam fits in with much of Bryn Jones's classic work, with a heavy emphasis on hand percussion, bass-heavy distortion, sharply clipped loops, and the seething hiss of static. All tracks written, played and recorded by Muslimgauze.

Muslimgauze - Jerusalaam  (flac  318mb)

01 Istanbul Liqueur 6:37
02 All The Stolen Land Of Palestine 5:57
03 Lozenji Of Pure Gold 2:37
04 The Zion Terrorist 1:58
05 Outside Night 2:32
06 Girl Of The Sahara 2:16
07 Tanger Blanc Return 3:33
08 Under The Burka 3:47
09 Sufiq Gulf Breeze 1-2 2:46
10 Sufiq Gulf Breeze 3 3:04
11 Hessian Bag Of Camel Parts 3:39
12 Sawhand Dafinda 8:33
13 Lime Green Turban Gang 3:22

Muslimgauze - Jerusalaam    (ogg  142mb)

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Sep 24, 2016

RhoDeo 1638 Grooves

Hello,

Today's artists are a much-derided group that never got their props.  Aside from New Order, they are the one group most responsible for the way we hear today's house records. Were they they alone in their time? No, but they solidified a pattern of beats and electronic sounds into a harder edged and more soulful version of HiNRG. Their kick drums are probably the only ones from the period (apart from New Order and a few Giorgio Moroder records that preceded them) that will endanger the foundation of your home. And like the aforementioned Moroder, Denis LePage's composition seamlessly made the hoky electronic ponderances of Kratwerk into something truly symphonic in nature. Their sound may be a little stuck in it's time on the majority of their records, but at their best those records sing.. ..... N'joy

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Lime was a Canadian synth music outfit from Montreal, Quebec. The group was composed of husband and wife Denis and Denyse LePage. Very early in their career, the group released an instrumental 12" single vinyl record called "The Break" under the name Kat Mandu. The single was successful and peaked at number three on the disco chart.[2] Singer Denyse also wrote and sang on the record "Dancin' the Night Away" by Voggue. In between the Kat Mandu project, the LePages also helped produced and arranged music for numerous studio projects, notably for acts signed to Prelude Records.

Lime released their debut album (Your Love) in 1981. The title track became a #1 dance hit in the US. "You're My Magician" was also a big dance hit in the US. "Your Love" was featured in the 1982 movie Summer Lovers.1982 saw the release of Lime's second album (Lime II) and the release of one of Lime's best known hits, "Babe We're Gonna Love Tonight". In 1983 Lime released Lime 3, and the album gave us the hits "Guilty" and "Angel Eyes".

1984, Lime released Sensual Sensation, and the single "My Love" was a minor hit, but not as successful as prior hits. Lime's next album was Unexpected Lovers and the title track was another big hit. 1986's release (Take The Love) gave Lime two more chart hits, "Gold Digger" and "Cutie Pie". After Lime's fame in the early to mid 1980s, Problems between Denis and Denyse started to rise, and they separated in 1989 , Denis and Denyse still worked together until 1996.


Lime continued to release albums through 2002, but their next 4 CDs: A Brand New Day (88), Caroline (91), The Stillness of the Night (98), Love Fury (02), failed to have any hit singles. The band faded from popularity in the 1990s, and Denis LePage signed over his half rights to classic Lime royalties before releasing a new album, Love Fury, in 2002. After Denyse LePage had left him Denis LePage teamed up with several vocalists (Amber Star Chaboyer, Benedict Ouiment, Chubby Tavares, Julie Courchesne, Marie-Piere Vaillancourt, and Mary Lassard) for the final Lime project.

Two younger singers, Joy Dorris and Chris Marsh, were chosen to tour and appear as Lime. Later, Rob Hubertz would replace Chris Marsh. Joy Dorris and Rob Hubertz continue to perform today. Denis LePage from the original Lime has come out as transgender. She now releases records as Nini No Bless.

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Lime's debut is a classic example of Canadian disco at it's very best. All tracks on this album stands the test of time. They still sound great after a quarter of a century. To many around the world, Lime is probably the best Hi-NRG group that ever existed. Although underground in the States, Lime was played in every place around the world, from radio stations to clubs, with hit after hit from every album they put out. Really one of the first groups to cater to Dj's with multiple versions on every album of their hit songs.



Lime - Your Love    (flac  461mb)

01 Your Love (Remix) 7:01
02 You're My Magician 7:38
03 It's You 7:19
04 I'll Be Yours 7:10
05 Agent 406 7:05
06 Your Love (Album Mix) 7:17
07 You're My Magician (Instrumental) 7:46
08 Your Love (Instrumental) 7:16
09 Your Love (Radio Edit) 4:02
10 You're My Magician (Radio Edit) 4:05

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You've probably never read about this album in Rolling Stones magazine...or seen a video of it on VH1/MTV...or heard it on Top40 radio. Thats because it has Dance beats! A huge crime never forgiven by the establishment!. Despite them this album deserves a lot of praise. It was this Canadian duo's second lp released in 1982....and their first fully electronic one. Over a killer rolling energetic drum programming track (in those Analogue days)....you get beautifully complex yet easy to swallow cool electronic arrangements. Over the top you get Denis Le Page's masculine rugged voice wailing with command. "Babe were gonna Love tonight" has a hipnotyzing synth line and the sing a long chorus is legendary. It was a pop hit in the more open minded main land Europe. Denis just writes beautiful vocal melodies...which you could sing along to on an acoustic guitar too. Totally recomended Synth heaven.



Lime - II   (flac  265mb)

01 Come And Get Your Love 8:07
02 Help Yourself 6:07
03 A Man And A Woman 6:45
04 Wake Dream 7:05
05 No Reply 5:20
06 Babe, We're Gonna Love Tonite 6:51

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Although this album wasn't groundbreaking or earth shattering as their previous album, the 3rd release from this canadian disco act still shines brightly on the dance floor! songs like "angel eyes", "guilty", and "on the grid" just pop and spark like brand new! boy, you didn't know such wondrous sensations could be brought out from a Roland jupiter 8, a juno-60, and the all-time beat machine, the tr-808.....



Lime - III   (flac 281mb)

01 Guilty 7:01
02 Angel Eyes 7:40
03 On The Grid 4:00
04 Give Me Your Body 7:15
05 Together 6:53
06 Rendez Vous On The Dark Side Of The Moon 8:01

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Once again Lime delivered a great album. Their music brings back a lot of happiness and good times and of course with a beat all their own! Lime had always straddled a fine line between cringeworthy kitsch and some more experimental, slightly sinister fare with melancholy undercurrents, which thankfully come to the fore on "Don't You Wanna Do It" and more so on the second side. "I Don't Want Wanna Lose You" and the haunting "The Party's Over" are just as good as previous hits, while "Extrasensory Perception" is a decent enough upgrade of "On The Grid".



Lime - Sensual Sensation   (flac 474mb)

01 It's Gonna Be Allright 5:32
02 My Love 5:27
03 Don't You Wanna Do It 6:03
04 Sensual Sensation 6:00
05 Take It Up 5:16
06 I Don't Wanna Lose You 5:58
07 Extrasensory Perception 4:59
08 The Party's Over 6:37
09 I Don't Wanna Lose You (Club Mix) 7:34
10 Take It Up (Mark Kamins Remix) 6:17
11 My Love (Mark Kamins Remix) 5:42
12 My Love (Radio Edit) 4:20
13 I Don't Wanna Lose You (Radio Edit) 4:09

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Sep 23, 2016

RhoDeo 1638 Re-Ups 72

Hello,

These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a small number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here and yes sign a name to your request and do it from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned)

Looka here another batch of 16 re-ups, requests fullfilled up to September 22th,  there's so much to be had here. My tip here randomly pick an archive date and move up or down a few pages to older or newer posts, browse was you get there and maybe you'll find something of your liking or it may triggers a memory of what you'd really want and then do a search  ...N' Joy

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10x Neu Deutsch Welle NOW in Flac ( D.A.F. - DAF, Kowalski - Schlagende Wetter, Einstuerzende Neubauten - Halber Mensch, Nina Hagen Band - I, Palais Schaumburg - Lupa, Holger Hiller - Ein Bündel Fäulnis In Der Grube, Der Plan - Geri Reig, Zaza - Zaza ) Back in ogg (  Xao Seffcheque - Sehr Gut, Kommt Sehr Gut, Die Neue Deutsche Welle War Da Da Da ......Wie Was Wo ? )


4x Beats NOW in Flac ( Stereo MC's - Supernatural, Deee-Lite - World Clique, Adamski - Doctor Adamski's Musical Pharmacy, Happy Mondays - P,T,B, Twelvers)


2x Roots Back in Flac (VA - Sounds And Pressure vol 1, VA - Sounds And Pressure vol 3)


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Sep 21, 2016

RhoDeo 1638 Aetix

Hello, dear oh dear Angelina breaks up with Brad, now who will be interested in a 3rd hand 41 year old woman without breasts and 6 kids in tow, even if she still got nice legs. Clearly her seriousness was no longer compatible with Brad's easy going (weed smoking). Well they both got plenty of money so no worries there and who really cares anyway...


Today's artists are an English ska band from Camden Town, London, that formed in 1976. One of the most prominent bands of the late 1970s and early 1980s 2 Tone ska revival, they continue to perform with their most recognised line-up of seven members. They achieved most of their success in the early to mid-1980s. Both Madness and UB40 spent 214 weeks on the UK singles charts over the course of the decade, holding the record for most weeks spent by a group in the 1980s UK singles charts. However, Madness achieved this in a shorter time period (1980–1986)..... ....N'Joy

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Along with the Specials, Madness were one of the leading bands of the ska revival of the late '70s and early '80s. As their career progressed, Madness branched away from their trademark "nutty sound" and incorporated large elements of Motown, soul, and British pop. Although the band managed one crossover American hit in 1983, they remained a British phenomenon, influencing several successive generations of musicians and becoming one of the most beloved groups the country produced during the '80s.

The origins of Madness lie in a ska group known as the Invaders, which was formed by Mike Barson, Chris Foreman, and Lee Thompson in 1976. By 1978, the band had changed their name to Morris and the Minors and had added Graham "Suggs" McPherson, Mark Bedford, Chas Smash, and Dan Woodgate to the group. Later in 1978, they changed their name to Madness, in homage to one of their favorite Prince Buster songs. The following year, Madness released their debut single, a tribute to Prince Buster entitled "The Prince," on Two-Tone. The song was a surprise success, reaching the British Top 20. Following its success, the band signed a record contract with Stiff Records and released another Prince Buster song, "One Step Beyond," which climbed to number seven.

One Step Beyond...Madness quickly recorded their debut album, also titled One Step Beyond, with producers Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley. Released toward the end of the year, the album peaked at number two in Britain and it stayed on the charts for well over a year. At the beginning of 1980, the band's third single, "My Girl," peaked at number three. For the next three years, the group had a virtually uninterrupted run of 13 Top Ten singles, during which time they were one of the most popular bands in Britain, rivaled only by the Jam in terms of widespread popularity. Where the Jam appealed to teenagers and young adults, Madness had a broad fan base, reaching from children to the elderly. Which didn't mean their music was diluted -- they continued to expand their sound, both musically and lyrically.

Absolutely In the spring of 1980, Madness released the Work Rest and Play EP, which reached number six on the strength of the EP's lead song, "Night Boat to Cairo." Also during the spring, One Step Beyond was released in the United States, where it peaked at 128. Madness' second album, Absolutely, was released in the fall of 1980. The record peaked at number two on the British charts, but it stalled at number 146, in the U.S. Sire dropped the band after the commercial disappointment of Absolutely, leaving Madness without an American record contract for several years.

Back in England, Madness continued to gain momentum, as the group began playing matinee shows on their tours so children under 16 years old could attend the concert. In the fall of 1981, the band released their third album, Seven, which peaked at number five. In January of 1982, Madness hit number four with a cover of Labi Siffre's "It Must Be Love." In March, their streak of Top Ten hits was interrupted when "Cardiac Arrest" stalled at number 14 on the charts, due to radio's reluctance to play the tune. The band bounced back a few months later with "House of Fun," their first number one single. That same month, the hits compilation, Complete Madness, reached number one.

Madness Presents the Rise & FallMadness returned in the late summer of 1982 with The Rise and Fall, their full-fledged shift to pop. Like their previous albums, it was a British hit, reaching the Top Ten, but it also contained the seeds of their brief American success with the Top Five British single "Our House." The single was released in America on the group's new label, Geffen, and it received heavy airplay from MTV. The music-video television network had previously played the videos for "House of Fun," "It Must Be Love," and "Cardiac Arrest" when the band's albums were unreleased in the United States, thereby setting the stage for "Our House" to become a massive hit. With "Our House," Madness had MTV exposure coincide with a record release for the first time, which sent the single into the American Top Ten in the summer of 1983. The success of the single brought the U.S. compilation album, Madness, to number 41. Madness managed one more American Top 40 hit that fall, when "It Must Be Love" peaked at number 33.

Keep Moving At the end of 1983, Mike Barson -- the band's key songwriter -- left the group to settle down with his wife. Although Madness was able to stay near the top of the charts with their first post-Barson release, "Michael Caine," the band's fortunes began to decline over the course of 1984. Upon its release in the spring, Keep Moving hit number six on the British charts; in America, the record reached number 109. In June, the group released its final single for Stiff Records, "One Better Day," which peaked at number 17. In the fall, Madness formed their own record label, Zarjazz. They released "Yesterday's Men," their first recording on Zarjazz, in September of 1985, nearly a year after the label's formation. The record peaked at number 18 and its parent album, Mad Not Mad, reached number 16 upon its October release. Their chart decline continued early in 1986, when their cover of Scritti Politti's "Sweetest Girl" peaked at number 35. For most of 1986, the group was quiet. In September, Madness announced they were disbanding. Two months later, their farewell single, "Waiting for the Ghost Train," was released, charting at number 18.

After staying dormant for a year-and-a-half, the group reunited at the beginning of 1988 as a quartet called the Madness, releasing its comeback single, "I Pronounce You," in March. The Madness featured Chris Foreman, Lee Thompson, Chas Smash, and Suggs, and was augmented by the Specials' keyboardists Jerry Dammers and Steve Nieve, and Bruce Thomas (bass) of the Attractions. "I Pronounce You" reached number 44 on the U.K. charts and its accompanying album stiffed upon its spring release. The group disbanded for a second time that fall.

The Lone Ranger In the summer of 1992, the original lineup of Madness reunited to perform two outdoor concerts at London's Finsbury Park. The group dubbed the event Madstock and released a recording of the shows on Go! Records. Madstock became an annual event for the next four years -- every summer the band would reunite and headline an outdoor festival at Finsbury Park. Suggs launched a solo career in 1995 with The Lone Ranger, which performed respectably in the U.K. charts. In 1996, Madness played the final Madstock and announced they planned not to reunite for future concerts, but by 1998 they were back on the road, with a Los Angeles date recorded for release as Universal Madness the following year. The group also reunited with original producers Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley to record their first new material in over a decade. The resulting Dangermen Sessions, Vol 1 was released in 2005, followed in 2009 by The Liberty of Norton Folgate, the group's ninth studio album. During 2012 the band took part in high-profile performances that celebrated the best of British culture. They played from the top of Buckingham Palace in Queen’s Diamond Jubilee party and also appeared in the closing ceremony of the London Olympic Games. As 2012 drew to a close, Madness released a new album called Oui, Oui, Si, Si, Ja, Ja, Da, Da. The group returned in 2016 with their 12th studio effort, Can't Touch Us Now.

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There’s a certain grandness to the title of Madness Presents the Rise & Fall, the group’s fourth album and undeniable pop masterpiece: it’s clear that the band has ambitions, to go several steps beyond ska, to craft nothing less than a Village Green Preservation Society for the ‘80s. The Kinks figure heavily in Madness’ design for The Rise & Fall, both in individual tunes and the overall arc of the concept album, but so does Ian Dury’s celebration of the riffraff of London, the latter giving Madness an earthiness that Ray Davies’ crew lacked during their time on the Village Green. While Madness’ forefathers are evident, The Rise & Fall is recognizably Madness in sound and sensibility; faint echoes of their breakneck nutty beginnings can be heard on “Blue Skinned Beast” and “Mr. Speaker Gets the Word,” the melodies are outgrowths of such early masterpieces as “My Girl,” there’s a charming, open-hearted humor and carnivalesque swirl that ties everything together. All this comes to a head on “Our House,” as divine a pop single as there ever was -- so undeniable that this very British anthem actually crossed over into the American Top Ten in 1983 -- but that’s merely the splashiest evidence of Madness’ popcraft on The Rise & Fall. The rest of the record contains the same wit, effervescence, and joy, capturing what British pop life was all about in 1982, just as Village Green Preservation Society did in 1968 or Blur’s Parklife would do in 1994.



Madness - The Rise and Fall   (flac  274mb)

01 Rise And Fall 3:16
02 Tomorrow's (Just Another Day) 3:10
03 Blue Skinned Beast 3:22
04 Primrose Hill 3:36
05 Mr Speaker Gets The Word 3:00
06 Sunday Morning 4:03
07 Our House 3:23
08 Tiptoes 3:30
09 New Delhi 3:41
10 That Face 3:40
11 Calling Cards 2:19
12 Are You Coming (With Me) 3:17
13 Madness (Is All In The Mind) 2:53


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By 1986, the Clive Langer/Alan Winstanley production team had become synonymous with an all-too-slick approach. And despite their previous, well-tempered work with the band, Keep Moving falls into the same formulaic pitfalls of the period, incorporating the overused Afrodiziak and TKO horns, as well as a full gospel choir and even a cameo from Michael Caine. Overbearing production aside, this is well-crafted Brit-pop that explores a brighter, though decidedly less memorable side than the previous album. [The American issue replaces the lesser "Waltz Into Mischief" with the stray singles "Wings of a Dove" and "The Sun and the Rain," along with "Prospects" and "Samantha," making it the preferable version of the album.]



Madness - Keep Moving (flac 285mb)

01 Keep Moving 3:33
02 Michael Caine 3:39
03 Turning Blue 3:06
04 One Better Day 4:06
05 March Of The Gherkins 3:30
06 Waltz Into Mischief 3:36
07 Brand New Beat 3:17
08 Victoria Gardens 4:32
09 Samantha 3:14
10 Time For Tea 3:08
11 Prospects 4:15
12 Give Me A Reason 3:26

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This ironically peppy set of '80s pop would prove to be Madness' final studio album, and the band was clearly not in the best of moods while they recorded it. Their previous album had suffered the weakest chart showing of the band's career, and they had recently lost their founding father figure (keyboardist Mike Barson). They had left their record company, setting up their own "Zarjazz" label. Like the Beatles' Let It Be, this record has "One Last Stab" written all over it. The album opens with a bitingly overt declaration of the band's determination to hang on in the cynically mercurial music business ("I'll Compete") and concludes with one of many images of an inevitably approaching ending ("shivering to a halt...no one wants to speak too soon, although we all knew"). Several songs dwell on themes of transience and aging ("Time," "Yesterday's Men, "), and the title track openly broods over the sting of Barson's departure. The album almost seems to fortell its own lack of success. Its ultimate failure to reignite the group's popularity might be blamed on the slickly synthetic over-production. Clive Langer and Alan Wistanley occasionally strike an inspired balance between soulful pop and subtle reggae rythyms, but more often they replace the warmth of Barson's pianos with a cold emphasis on drum machines and synthesizers. Some of the songwriting, however, is on par with the band's most mature work, and the lively melodies lend a perfect irony to the band's wry social commentary and personal brooding.



Madness - Mad Not Mad (flac256mb)

01 I'll Compete 3:21
02 Yesterday's Men 4:37
03 Uncle Sam 4:16
04 White Heat 3:47
05 Mad Not Mad 4:11
06 Sweetest Girl 5:46
07 Burning The Boats 4:31
08 Tears You Can't Hide 3:09
09 Time 4:21
10 Coldest Day 4:25
Bonus
11 Yesterday's Men (Extended Version) 8:11
12 Uncle Sam (Ray Gun Mix) 6:46
13 Sweetest Girl (Extended Mix) 5:46
14 (Waiting For The) Ghost Train 3:45

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Sep 20, 2016

RhoDeo 1638 Roots

Hello,

The music of Brazil encompasses various regional music styles influenced by African, European and Amerindian forms. After 500 years of history, Brazilian music developed some unique and original styles such as samba, bossa nova, MPB, sertanejo, pagode, tropicalia, choro, maracatu, embolada (coco de repente), mangue bit, funk carioca (in Brazil simply known as Funk), frevo, forró, axé, brega, lambada, and Brazilian versions of foreign musical genres, such as Brazilian rock and rap.


Today an international singing superstar and songwriter, he may have his roots in Brazil, but his songs have touched audiences all over the world. Born in Rio, his adoptive parents, both white, brought him to Tres Pontas, a small town in the state of Minas Gerais, when he was two. He began singing as a teenager. When he was 19, he moved to the capital Belo Horizonte and began singing wherever and whenever he could. Finally he caught a break when the pop singer Elis Regina recorded one of his songs, "Canção do Sal," in 1966. Regina got him a showcase on a popular Brazilian TV program, and after performing at Brazil's International Song Festival the following year, his career was launched. ........N'Joy

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Milton Nascimento born October 26, 1942, Rio de Janeiro his mother, Maria Nascimento, was a maid. As a baby, Milton Nascimento was adopted by a couple who were his mother's former employers; Josino Brito Campos, a bank employee, mathematics teacher and electronic technician and Lília Silva Campos, a music teacher and choir singer. When he was 18 months old, Nascimento's biological mother died, and he moved with his adopted parents to the city of Três Pontas, in the state of Minas Gerais. Nascimento was an occasional DJ on a radio station that his father once ran. He lived in the boroughs of Laranjeiras and Tijuca in Rio de Janeiro.

In the early stages of his career, Nascimento played in two samba groups, Evolussamba and Sambacana. In 1963, he moved to Belo Horizonte, where his friendship with Lô Borges led to the Clube da Esquina ("corner club") movement. Members included Beto Guedes, Toninho Horta, Wagner Tiso, and Flávio Venturini, with whom he shared compositions and melodies.

Nascimento is famous for his falsetto and tonal range, as well for highly acclaimed songs such as "Maria, Maria", "Canção da América" ("Song from America"/"Unencounter"), "Travessia" ("Bridges"), "Bailes da Vida", and "Coração de Estudante" ("Student's Heart"). The lyrics remember the funeral of the student Edson Luís, killed by police officers in 1968. The song became the hymn for the Diretas Já social-political campaign in 1984, was played at the funeral of the late President of Brazil Tancredo Neves the next year, and was also played at Ayrton Senna's funeral.

In 1972 he collaborated with fellow lyricists Márcio Borges, Fernando Brant, Ronaldo Bastos, and other friends to record Clube da Esquina, a double album that spurred three hit singles, including "Cais (Dock)" and "Cravo é Canela (Clove and Cinnamon)." The singles are still being recorded and have become standards in Brazil over the years. Since he began recording with his self-titled debut in 1967 for the Codil label, Nascimento has written and recorded 28 albums.

O Planeta Blue Na Estrada do SolNascimento's many achievements include Grammy nominations for his O Planeta Blue na Estrada do Sol in 1992, and in 1995 for his Warner Bros. debut, Angelus. Nascimento is also winner of the 1992 Down Beat International Critics' Poll and the 1991 Down Beat Readers' Poll. Nascimento has toured throughout the U.S., Europe, Japan, and Latin America.His lengthy discography includes Courage, a 1969 album for A&M and Milton Nascimento that same year for EMI Odeon; Milton, also for the EMI Odeon label, recorded in 1970, and then four more albums for the label EMI Odeon: Clube da Esquina (1972), Milagre dos Peixes (1973), Milagre dos Peixes (Ao Vivo) (1973), and Minas (1975).

His other titles include Native Dancer (CBS, 1976), Geraes (EMI Odeon, 1976), Milton (A&M, 1977), Clube da Esquina 2 (EMI Odeon, 1978), A Brazilian Love Affair, a collaboration with George Duke (CBS Records, 1980), Journey to Dawn (A&M Records, 1979), and a series of five albums for Ariola: Sentinela (1980), Cacador de Mim (1981), Missa dos Quilombos (1982), Anima (1982), and Milton Nascimento ao Vivo (1983).

His output through the rest of the 1980s and '90s has been steady and reliable, though never musically predictable. Like any true jazz and pop veteran, Nascimento has a deep need to keep challenging himself, vocally, lyrically, and stylistically. Nascimento's other releases include Encontros e Despedidas for Barclay in 1985, Corazon Americano for PolyGram in 1986, A Barca dos Amantes for Barclay in 1986, Milton/RPM for Epic/CBS in 1987, Yauaretê for CBS in 1987, Miltons in 1988 for CBS, Txai for the same label in 1990, and O Planeta Blue na Estrada do Sol for CBS in 1991.

Amigo In the mid-'90s, Nascimento switched to Warner Bros. He released two excellent, readily available albums for the label, Angelus, his 27th recording, in 1995, Amigo in 1996, Nascimento in 1997, and Crooner in 1999. He returned after a short hiatus in 2003 with Pieta, followed by The Essential Collection: The Best of the EMI Odeon Years (1969-78) in 2006.

This charismatic Brazilian superstar just won't slow down any time soon, and whether he's packing a stadium in Brazil or singing at a club in New York, his experienced stage persona allows everyone in the audience to feel as if they're in his living room. On Angelus, he's joined by saxophonist Wayne Shorter, who pays tribute to Nascimento's 1975 Native Dancer LP, the high point of which was the synthesis between Nascimento's voice and Shorter's saxophone. That album helped to solidify Nascimento's place on the international jazz and pop scene in the 1970s. Whatever he writes and sings about, be it the planet, ways of living, and loving and dying, his music has always carried an eternally optimistic spirit. As he entered the millennium, Nascimento won a Grammy for Best Contemporary Pop Album for 1999's Crooner at the first annual Latin Grammy Awards in fall 2000.

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Milton Nascimento's first album for North American ears, recorded at Van Gelder Studios in New Jersey under the watchful eye and discerning ear of Creed Taylor, is a masterpiece, a gorgeously executed tour through his early songs. Backed beautifully by Eumir Deodato's lush orchestrations and a clutch of sidemen from the Taylor stable (including Herbie Hancock, Airto Moreira, and Hubert Laws), Nascimento unveils one first-class tune after another, many of which would ignite a rush of cover versions. Among the songs North Americans heard for the first time were "Vera Cruz," "Tres Pontas," "Morro Velho," the scatted "Catavento," and the intensely moving "Bridges" ("Travessia")" -- the latter which launched Nascimento's name on the world music scene. Singing in English, Portuguese, and often with no words at all, Nascimento's odd yet masculine and expressive baritone stands out like a moaning foghorn from the smooth A&M/Taylor sonic formula, a haunting combination. This was Nascimento before tropicalismo, when he latched onto the tail end of the bossa nova movement and quickly became one of its most inspired performers and songwriters. To some admirers, Courage remains his best record, period.



Milton Nascimento - Courage  (flac  207mb)

01 Bridges (Travessia) 3:49
02 Vera Cruz 3:10
03 Tres Pontas 2:36
04 Outubro (October) 4:09
05 Courage 3:23
06 Rio Vermelho 3:19
07 Gira Girou (Round N' Round) 3:21
08 Morro Velho 4:26
09 Catavento 2:26
10 Cancao Do Sol (Saltworkers Song) 3:06

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A classic double LP recorded in 1972 by Milton Nascimento and Lô Borges, the album had orchestrations from Eumir Deodato and Wagner Tiso under the conduction of the renowned clarinetist/composer/orchestrator Paulo Moura. The title Clube da Esquina is related to the gang of mineiros (people from the Minas Gerais state) that populate this release, either singing compositions or vocal/instrumental performances, like Nascimento and Borges themselves: Wagner Tiso, Beto Guedes, Milton Guedes, Tavito, Toninho Horta, Márcio Borges, Ronaldo Bastos, and Fernando Brant, among others. The album covers a great number of Clube da Esquina hits, like "Tudo Que Você Podia Ser," "Cais," "O Trem Azul," "Caravo E Canela," "Um Girassol da Cor do Seu Cabelo," "San Vicente," "Clube da Esquina No. 2," and so many others, with the competent backing of some of the best musicians in Brazil, including bassist Luiz Alves and percussionist Robertinho Silva. A must-have.



Milton Nascimento e Lô Borges - Clube da Esquina   (flac  486mb)

01 Tudo Que Você Podia Ser 2:57
02 Cais 2:45
03 O Trem Azul 4:05
04 Saídas E Bandeiras Nº 1 0:45
05 Nuvem Cigana 2:59
06 Cravo E Canela 2:31
07 Dos Cruces 5:22
08 Um Girassol Da Cor De Seu Cabelo 4:12
09 San Vicente 2:46
10 Estrelas 0:28
11 Clube Da Esquina Nº 2 3:38
12 Paisagem Da Janela 2:58
13 Me Deixa Em Paz 3:05
14 Os Povos 4:30
15 Saídas E Bandeiras # 2 1:30
16 Um Gosto De Sol 4:20
17 Pelo Amor De Deus 2:06
18 Lilia 2:33
19 Trem De Doido 3:58
20 Nada Será Como Antes 3:23
21 Ao Que Vai Nascer 3:20
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One of Milton Nascimento's most experimental albums, Milagre Dos Peixes was originally released in 1974. Accompanied by the Som Imaginário, Nascimento presented this album in a theater show in Rio and São Paulo, with orchestra, and the result live recorded and released on a double album called Milagre Dos Peixes Ao Vivo. In one of the worst periods of military dictatorship, all lyrics were systematically censored, the reason why the album is instrumental. Not entirely, to be sure. He can be heard crying "Eu Tô Cansado" (I Am Tired), and he also sings the lyrics of "Sacramento," having the boy Nico Borges delivering "Pablo" with that mixture, so dear to Nascimento, of a poor boy's ingenuity filled with a religious aura. It can be said that this album was especially suited for the talents of Naná Vasconcellos, who adds so much life to it. A must-have classic.



Milton Nascimento - Milagre dos Peixes   (flac 216mb)

01 Os Escravos de Jó 3:12
02 Carlos, Lúcia, Chico E Tiago 6:03
03 Milagre Dos Peixes 2:51
04 A Chamada 4:18
05 Cadè-/Canto: Nico E Telo 3:58
06 Pablo II 3:13
07 Tema Dos Deuses 3:23
08 Hoje É Dia de el-Rey 6:55
09 Última Sessao de Musica 2:18
10 Sacramento 1:52
11 Pablo-Canto: Nico 2:53

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Milton (Minas) (referring to his home state of Minas Gerais) is a remarkably cohesive piece of work that stands as one of his finest. Recorded in 1976, "Milton" follows closely on the heels of "Native Dancer", the album that paired the gifted brazilian singer-song-writer Milton Nascimento with saxophonist Wayne Shorter and put him squarely in that international jazz-pop star corner. Once again Milton is backed by Shorter on soprano saxophone and Herbie Hancock on piano. Shorter's expert, sometimes airily ethereal horn complements Nascimento's yearning yet free-spirited baritone, a voice that ranges from a tremulous vibrato to a soaring, effortless falsetto, as on "Os Povos".



Milton Nascimento - Milton (flac 251mb)

01 Raça (Hasa) (Race) 3:35
02 Fairy Tale Song (Cadé) 4:11
03 Francisco 4:27
04 Nothing Will Be As It Was (Nada Será Como Antes) 3:53
05 Cravi E Canela (Clove And Cinnamon) 3:44
06 The Call (Chamada) 5:49
07 One Coin (Tostáo) 5:30
08 Saídas E Bandeiras (Exits And Flags) 4:45
09 Os Povos (The People) 8:06

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Sep 19, 2016

RhoDeo 1638 Young 1's 8th

Hello, not much interest interest in the Paralympics from the mainstream media, go figure. Looking at the final medal table the US shows that handicapped people are much better of in China or in the UK or even Ukraine, shameful ! US a Christian country ? far far from it. That said the Nordic countries were surprisingly absent as well and Germany got less medals then the Dutch but they did broadcast several hours each day of the tournament on mainstream TV, plenty of back ground on the athletes and how they dealt with their handicap and as such inspiring television. The amazing human spirit in full glory.... such a shame that so many didn't even got a chance to witness it...


Today the 8th episode of an 'historical' 12-episode dramatization of student life in early eighties UK, hooliganism had not made the headlights yet, but dare i say it quickly followed after this series was broadcast. Inspiring clueless chaos ..N'Joy

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The Young Ones is a British "variety" show, broadcast in the United Kingdom from 1982 to 1984 in two six-part series. Shown on BBC2, it featured anarchic, offbeat humour which helped bring alternative comedy to television in the 1980s and made household names of its writers and performers. In 1985, it was shown on MTV, one of the first non-music television shows on the fledgling channel. In a 2004 poll, it ranked at number 31 in the BBC's list of Britain's Best Sitcoms.

The main characters were four undergraduate students who were sharing a house: aggressive punk Vyvyan (Adrian Edmondson), conceited wannabe anarchist Rick (Rik Mayall), oppressed paranoid hippie Neil (Nigel Planer), and the suave, charming Mike (Christopher Ryan). It also featured Alexei Sayle, who played various members of the Balowski family—most often Jerzei Balowski, the quartet's landlord—and occasional independent characters, such as the train driver in "Bambi" and the Mussolini-lookalike Police Chief in "Cash".
Stories were set in a squalid house where the students lived during their time at Scumbag College.

The show combined traditional sitcom style with violent slapstick, non-sequitur plot turns, and surrealism. Every episode except one featured a live performance by a band, including Madness, Motörhead, and The Damned. This was a device used to qualify the series for a larger budget, as "variety" shows attracted higher fees than "comedy"

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with

Adrian Edmondson - Vyvyan...
Rik Mayall - Rick...
Nigel Planer - Neil
Christopher Ryan - Mike
Alexei Sayle - The Balowski Family...
Mark Arden - Boy in Comic Strip... (7 episodes)
Stephen Frost - Bank Vault Manager... (7 episodes)
Ben Elton - Baz ... (5 episodes)


The Young Ones 08 Cash (mp4  275mb)

08 Cash 34:52

Vyvyan believes he's having a baby! But the boys are cash-strapped and burning all of their possessions for heat, so Neil is forced (by his housemates) to join the police force to earn money.

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Previously

The Young Ones 01 Demolition (mp4  266mb)
The Young Ones 02 Oil (mp4  264mb)
The Young Ones 03 Bored (mp4  284mb)
The Young Ones 04 Bomb (mp4  285mb)
The Young Ones 05 Intresting (mp4  258mb)
The Young Ones 06 Flood (mp4  247mb)
The Young Ones 07 Bambi (mp4  282mb)


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Sep 18, 2016

Sundaze 1638

Hello, Rosberg put out a phenominal qualification lap, Hamilton 0.7 sec behind, huge gap that beween the two Ricciardo came closest at 5 tenth. Could be an interesting race tomorrow with last years winner Vettel having to start at the back.

About today's artist, a music project of Bryn Jones (17 June 1961 – 14 January 1999), a British ethnic electronica and experimental musician who was influenced by conflicts in the Muslim world, with an emphasis on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. With dozens of albums released under the Muslimgauze name, Jones was prolific, but his mainstream success was limited due in part to his work being issued mostly in limited editions on small record labels. His music was described by one critic as "among the most startling and unique in the noise underground."... N'Joy

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Jones first released music in 1982 as E.g Oblique Graph on Kinematograph, his own imprint, and the independent co-op label Recloose, run by Simon Crab. E.g Oblique Graph came from the do-it-yourself (DIY) ethos of the time and was musically composed of electronic/experimental drone with occasional synth-melodic hooks and use of radio broadcast samples. Track titles were sometimes politicised such as "Murders linked to Gaullist Clique" on Extended Play (1982) and "Castro Regime" on Triptych (1982).

After operation Peace of the Galilee, the first Muslimgauze album, Hammer & Sickle (1983) appeared on another of Jones's label monikers, Hessian. Under the Muslimgauze alias, music switched from emphasis on pure synthesis to percussion textures, which grew to encompass acoustic drum kits, drum machines, assorted ethnic hand percussion, and even rudimentary objects like pots and pans. Synthesis and tape loop samples were often relegated to accompaniment.

Releases at the time were occasionally on cassette, more often vinyl EPs and LPs; the longest running of Jones' label monikers, Limited Editions, started with Hunting Out with an Aerial Eye (1984) followed by Buddhist on Fire, put out by Recloose the same year. Since then, Jones roughly released an album a year, given scarce financial resources until 1988, when he began making inroads with then-emerging labels Staalplaat, Soleilmoon, and Extreme Records. In 1988, Staalplaat released the first Muslimgauze CD, Iran, the subsequent catalogue migrated to mostly that format.

By the late 1980s, Jones ran out of funding to self release, and other labels that did put out Muslimgauze releases such as Recloose and Permis De Construire (which put out Coup D'État) did not pay promised royalties. Recloose head Simon Crab cited lack of sales and damaged records from fire bombing as his reason.

The neighbouring Thomas a Becket pub run by East End gangsters—common-or-garden low-level vicious thugs (years before the species was romanticized by Lock Stock and Mona Lisa)—unable to control our unlicensed trade in alcohol and other illicits, firebombed the building one night and attacked the crew on a regular basis (ironically, many of the new pressings of Muslimgauze's Buddhist on Fire stored in the Recloose offices were destroyed during this attack).

The deal with Recloose was that we paid 50 percent of the profits to the artist and 50 percent went to the label, which was a pretty good deal, especially since we didn't sell that much. We put a lot of energy into marketing, and most of the artists signed to the label sold off the back of Bourbonese Qualk anyway. He assumed we sold loads of albums but we didn't even cover the costs.

At this time distributors Soleilmoon, Staalplaat, and Extreme Records transitioned to a label proper with the advent of the compact disc format, which became less expensive to produce and ship than vinyl over time and gradually took on the Muslimgauze catalogue. After a positive experience with the release of Intifaxa (1990) with Extreme, Jones remained with the label until his final release with it, Citadel, in 1994.

It was with the release of United States of Islam (1991) a formalised agreement was reached with Extreme Records, which helped fund professional studio recordings, designed attractive packaging, and used a more extensive distribution network. Though pleased at first, Jones was frustrated with Extreme's one-release-a-year policy and in 1993 signed with then-sibling labels Soleilmoon and Staalplaat, which offered a more frequent release schedule. 1993 saw the release of Vote Hezbollah, Veiled Sisters and a re-release of Iran on Soleilmoon and Hamas Arc, Satyajit Eye and Betrayal on Staalplaat.

As someone who always had more musical supply than demand[according to whom?], Jones additionally released material on nearly any small label that approached him, including Parade Amoureuse, Minus Habens Records, Concrete Productions, Daft, and Jara. A drawback with releasing on so many labels was gratuitous editing by producers and, through design or circumstance, no royalties. Extreme cited betrayal by distribution networks that were unscrupulous or filed for bankruptcy and could not pay—though they also claimed to have eventually remunerated Jones. Lack of due royalties was a source of ongoing stress throughout Jones's career.

In 1995, he had six releases; in 1996, 15; in 1997, nine; in 1998, 16. After his death, the many record companies with which he had associated released unreleased material and re-pressed older, out-of-print material. In 1999, the year of his death, 22 new (and old) albums and EPs on several media were released.

As frequency of releases increased, Jones was able to musically respond to events in the Muslim world as they occurred. Cases in point were the 1993 Oslo Accords, which surfaced as Betrayal and 1994's Hebron Massacre (also known as the Cave of the Patriarchs massacre) released under the same name just months after the tragedy.

Toward the end of his life, Jones involved himself in more collaborative efforts in projects like the Rootsman, Apollon, and Systemwide. Jones also made arrangements to release with other labels in addition to his mainstays (something done throughout his career, more so toward the end) such as D.O.R., Third Eye, BSI, Klanggalerie, and DAFT. In addition, the frequency of live shows increased, some recorded such as at on Air West in Japan, Mort Aux Vaches for VPRO Dutch Radio, and aboard the ship, the Stubnitz. It seemed no combination of labels, collaborations, or live performances could exhaust his musical output. Media scrutiny increased too (albeit mostly on independent publications) with a total of eight interviews in 1998.

He always stated that he never had time to listen to other people's music, although in a 1992 interview with Impulse Magazine, he mentioned that he enjoyed traditional music of Japan, the Middle East, and India, as well as the works of artists such as Can, Throbbing Gristle, Wire, and Faust. However, despite a few collaborations, Jones didn't trust anyone when it came to remixing his music. Instead, he took pieces of music sent to him and remixed them to his own liking. On Wednesday, 30 December 1998, Bryn was rushed to the hospital in Manchester with a rare fungal infection in his bloodstream, for which he had to be heavily sedated. His body eventually shut down, and he died on 14 January 1999.

Jones claimed Muslimgauze was formed in response to Operation Peace of the Galilee, Israel's 1982 invasion of Lebanon to stem attacks from Palestinian Liberation Organization guerrillas stationed in South Lebanon. This event inspired Jones to research the conflict's origins, which grew into a lifelong artistic focal point, and he became a staunch supporter of the Palestinian cause, and often dedicated recordings to the Palestinian Liberation Organization or a free Palestine. Jones's research further grew to encompass other conflict-ridden, predominantly Muslim countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Chechnya, Iran, and Iraq. He concluded that Western interests for natural resources and strategic-political gain were root causes for many of these conflicts and should Western meddling halt, said regions would stabilise.

When asked what he would do if conflicts in the Muslim world were peaceably resolved, Jones replied his music would champion other conflict regions such as China's occupation of Tibet. He also admitted Muslimgauze music could be appreciated outside a political context as the majority of it is instrumental; politicised only by track and album titles as well as occasional newscast and ethnic music samples. It was his hope that listeners would read album and track title references and verify for themselves the meanings through independent research and thought.

The name Muslimgauze is a play on the word muslin (a type of gauze) combined with Muslim, referring to Bryn Jones' preoccupation with conflicts throughout the Muslim world..

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Shorter than many of Muslimgauze's 1990s albums -- 13 untitled songs over 45 minutes -- Azzazzin, originally released as part of the limited-edition subscription series, feels more like a collection of random experiments than a cohesive piece of work per se. If not something that would intrigue the casual listener, the hardcore fan will likely find something of interest on the various tracks here. Starting with an extremely minimal opening number -- it's no surprise Finnish experimental duo Pan Sonic are Muslimgauze fans, based on this track -- Azzazzin has a much more electronic feeling than most of Bryn Jones' other albums, eschewing the traditional elements used elsewhere for a rough, quietly aggressive and disturbing feel. Comparisons with Aphex Twin aren't too far off the mark here, but this is still clearly a Muslimgauze release than any sort of ripoff. The fourth track, with its unpredictable keyboard snarls over a low, quiet pulse, and the sixth and seventh songs, with distorted, high-pitched noise tones mixed with a soft series of bass notes and a slight spoken-word interjection from time to time, are some of the strong points from this intriguing release. Beats are used in an extremely limited way throughout Azzazzin, with rhythm, always a key component of Jones' work, more suggested at points by the nature of the keyboard lines than anything else. Closing with an equally minimal track, Azzazzin won't be everyone's cup of tea, but adventuresome listeners will find themselves rewarded.



Muslimgauze - Azzazin  (flac  246mb)


01 Untitled 4:29
02 Untitled 5:02
03 Untitled 2:21
04 Untitled 4:57
05 Untitled 5:45
06 Untitled 5:13
07 Untitled 2:00
08 Untitled 1:03
09 Untitled 2:11
10 Untitled 4:11
11 Untitled 2:10
12 Untitled 2:01
13 Untitled 3:27

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Boldly named after one of the most notorious Palestinian terrorist organizations, the group which carried out the Israeli Olympic athlete massacre in 1972, Return of Black September matches its dark black artwork and design with equally doom-laden music (mastered as one track, despite the five separate song titles listed on the back). The title track relies on a slightly more gentle ominousness, with soft string plucking reverberating around the beat, but things start to pick up accordingly with the more aggressive, sharp-edged electronics shading into a tense blend of percussion and energy on "Libya"; after shading away into a more minimal midsection, the track returns at a nervous, quick pace, with drums and drum pads firing off echoes into the mix as drones snake in and out of the song. One particularly gripping section has shards of noise firing off in all directions before settling back into the frazzled energy of the central beat, feeling like a soundtrack to a particularly good chase scene in a movie. "Thuggee" and its accompanying remix keep the unsettled edge up, with sudden drum and electronic pulse intrusions erupting over the main flow of the songs. It's interesting to hear how Bryn Jones' love of dub applies itself in even more creative and different ways than from his productions of some years before, exchanging the slow pace for a fast one and applying Krautrock drone principles. A nicely stretched out, creepy remix of Gun Aramaic's "Opiate and Mullah" wraps up this fine effort.



Muslimgauze - Return Of Black September      (flac  448mb)

only 1 track index
Part 1 Return Of Black September 8:58
Part 2 Libya 22:52
Part 3 Thugghee 22:59
Part 4 Remix Of Return Of Black September 9:01
Part 5 Remix Of Opiate And Mullah 4:35

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"Saladin Mercy" begins Gun Aramaic on a familiar touch, perhaps almost too familiar; while a certain consistency to Muslimgauze's work is no surprise, Bryn Jones generally varies things from album to album just enough to create distinct, different listening experiences for each release. Still, "Saladin Mercy" feels like something which easily could have been on his previous Soleilmoon/Staalplaat release Maroon, with its blend of the drones from earlier pieces and the more recent tweaking and heavy variety in the rhythms throughout the song. The following track, the first "8 am, Tel Aviv, Islamic Jihad," sets things more to rights, with a combination of sharp pulses, echoing roars, and what sounds like a domestic squabble between a couple caught on tape -- a characteristically strange combination which again works out quite nicely in the end. A little more than most Muslimgauze releases, Gun Aramaic is very environmental in terms of its composition; the reliance on conversational snippets throughout almost turns the album into a soundtrack for a non-existent film. As is often the case for Muslimgauze, the most fascinating elements of Gun Aramaic often are the simplest, such as the persistent, slow-rising beat in the first "Opiate and Mullah," or the shift from near silence to an elegant, slightly creepy keyboard arrangement about thirteen minutes into "Oil Prophets (pt. 1, 2, 3)." Gun wraps things up on a very moody note with the dark rumblings concluding "Oil Prophets (pt. 4, 5)" and the quite brief but deep, moody drones of the second "Opiate and Mullah," making for a slightly unexpected end to a fair album.



Muslimgauze - Gun Aramaic  (flac  388mb)

01 Saladin Mercy 7:12
02 8 AM, Tel Aviv, Islamic Jihad 9:18
03 Opiate And Mullah 6:47
04 Oil Prophets (Pt 1, 2, 3) 16:53
05 8 AM, Tel Aviv, Islamic Jihad 9:26
06 Lazzaream Ul Lepar 1:56
07 Oil Prophets (Pt 4, 5) 11:19
08 Opiate And Mullah 0:29

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In title and general design meant to be the sequel to the first Gun, Part 2 turns out to be a slightly different beast in the end, one which in the end turns out to be rather more interesting than the original album. The one-two opening punch of the first "Sikh Needle" and "Shia Psalm" provides yet another fantastic start to a Muslimgauze release, the first track being based around an extremely atypical noise/rhythm collage mixed with sudden percussion and sample interjections, while the second begins with a similar wash of noise and conversation before breaking into a great hip-hop loop, distorted, tweaked and overlaid with other beats as it goes. This in turn settles in a barely-there midsection, with buried notes and beats gently rising out of nowhere, before returning to the original elements of the song, which then is further mixed with more expected Muslimgauze elements (acoustic percussion, moody keyboards) to create a masterful ending. Going from there into the crisp, minimal cymbal beat that starts the second "Sikh Needle," Part 2 surges from strength to strength, increasingly exploring breakbeats as a newer weapon in Bryn Jones' particular sonic arsenal, while also further refining his basic sonic approach. The attractive shimmer of metallic chiming mixed with a similarly metronomic beat and a series of interwoven vocal samples on the first "Sharia Limb," not to mention unexpected jolts of noise and harsh, relentless beats and clatters leading into a wheezing ambient wash punctuated with further conversational snippets, all on the second "Sharia Limb," are just two highlights worthy of note.



Muslimgauze - Muslimgauze - Gun Aramaic, part 2  (flac  333mb)

01 Sikh Needle 1:31
02 Shia Psalm 9:12
03 Sikh Needle 6:47
04 Saladin Mercy 6:59
05 Sharia Limb 6:40
06 Sharia Limb 5:35
07 Shai Psalm 12:28
08 Alms And Gold Dust 0:58

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