Jun 25, 2012

RhoDeo 1226 HHGTTG 5


Hello, well i've been unable to get my hard disk out thusfar, all the more unexpected as i installed it myself, as always there's one screw that won't come out, its very difficult to reach and i have no idea how i got it in in the first place, chances are i damaged it, sigh. Well I won't give up and keep my temper.... Meanwhile chromes autologin didnt work and the previous one didn't save (thank you idiot proof windows 7) i had to get a new one to get here and what do you think happened when i restarted chrome the autologon functioned again, all this because the new blogger look now won't let me upload pics with the browser i've used these past 10 years, Opera. Not sure if squeezing the customer is helping the value of Google here.

Meanwhile I do have another episode of the Hitchhikers Guide to keep your spirits up

 xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Here is the BBC television adaptation of Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy broadcast in January and February 1981 on BBC Two. The adaptation follows the original radio series in 1978 and 1980. The series stars Simon Jones as Arthur Dent, David Dixon as Ford Prefect, Mark Wing-Davey as Zaphod Beeblebrox and Sandra Dickinson as Trillian. The voice of the guide is by Peter Jones. Simon Jones, Peter Jones, Stephen Moore and Mark Wing-Davey had already provided the voices for their characters in the original radio series in 1978/80. In addition, the series features a number of notable cameo roles, including Adams himself on several occasions.

Although initially thought by BBC executives to be unfilmable, the series was successfully produced and directed by Alan J. W. Bell and went on to win a Royal Television Society award as Most Original Programme of 1981, as well as several BAFTA awards for its graphics and editing.


xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

After an initial period of confusion, the four travelers find they have been transported forward in time to just before the end of the universe. They are in Milliways, the "Restaurant at the End of the Universe," which was built on the ruins of Magrathea. So, as Arthur says, they have traveled through time but not through space. Waiting for them is Marvin the depressed robot, who they left on Magrathea millions of years ago. He's now an attendant at the car park, and still depressed. Just before the universe ends, Zaphod and Ford get Marvin to help them steal a supercool all-black spaceship, which turns out to be the property of a very loud rock band called "Disaster Area." The episode ends on the cliff-hanger as the black ship is about to start a dive into the sun of Kakrafoon.


HHGTTG 5 ( 232mb)

01 Episode 5 32:20

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

before

HHGTTG 1 ( 232mb)
HHGTTG 2 ( 232mb)
HHGTTG 3 ( 232mb)
HHGTTG 4 ( 232mb)

Jun 18, 2012

RhoDeo 1225 HHGTTG 4


Hello, well i've been unable to get my hard disk out thusfar, all the more unexpected as i installed it myself, as always there's one screw that won't come out, its very difficult to reach and i have no idea how i got it in in the first place, chances are i damaged it, sigh. Well I won't give up and keep my temper....

Meanwhile I do have another episode of the Hitchhikers Guide to keep your spirits up

 xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Here is the BBC television adaptation of Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy broadcast in January and February 1981 on BBC Two. The adaptation follows the original radio series in 1978 and 1980. The series stars Simon Jones as Arthur Dent, David Dixon as Ford Prefect, Mark Wing-Davey as Zaphod Beeblebrox and Sandra Dickinson as Trillian. The voice of the guide is by Peter Jones. Simon Jones, Peter Jones, Stephen Moore and Mark Wing-Davey had already provided the voices for their characters in the original radio series in 1978/80. In addition, the series features a number of notable cameo roles, including Adams himself on several occasions.

Although initially thought by BBC executives to be unfilmable, the series was successfully produced and directed by Alan J. W. Bell and went on to win a Royal Television Society award as Most Original Programme of 1981, as well as several BAFTA awards for its graphics and editing.


xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Slartibartfast shows Arthur the archive tapes of Deep Thought being given the "Search for the Ultimate Answer" and of the result reported by the computer seven and a half million years later. After learning that the Earth was set up to search for the "Ultimate Question," Slartibartfast and Arthur join Ford, Trillian, Zaphod, and Trillian's mice, who had guided them to Magrathea.
The mice dismiss Slartibartfast, then express their desire to extract the "Ultimate Question" by first extracting Arthur's brain. While the mice attempt to strike a deal, the Galactic Police arrive, and Ford, Arthur, Trillian and Zaphod flee the dining hall, only to be cornered by the police in a large bay. After a misunderstanding, the police continue to fire on a computer bank behind which the four are hiding, which explodes, ending the episode on a cliffhanger.


HHGTTG 4 ( 232mb)

01 Episode 4 32:20

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

before

HHGTTG 1 ( 232mb)
HHGTTG 2 ( 232mb)
HHGTTG 3 ( 232mb)

Jun 11, 2012

RhoDeo 1224 HHGTTG


Hello, well i've been unable to get rid of the virus and even to reinstall my OS, duh i've bought an external case creating a USB disk and will reformat the infected partition that way. Maybe it will go down sweat and easy or maybe not..I have no experience with it but hey, anyway with all the other distractions going on this week Euro football and analysis then there was Roland Garros aswell as another exiting F1 race this evening, rarely seen Hamilton so pleased after the race, considering how close it was-just 35 sec in front of no 10- this season shapes up to become an alltime classic, 7 different winners and at least 3 potential winners still in the wings. Hmm anyway that's why havent gotten around to repairing yet and I'm still on this slow machine with a noisy HD. I will be back...

Meanwhile I do have another episode of the Hitchhikers Guide to keep your spirits up

 xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Here is the BBC television adaptation of Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy broadcast in January and February 1981 on BBC Two. The adaptation follows the original radio series in 1978 and 1980. The series stars Simon Jones as Arthur Dent, David Dixon as Ford Prefect, Mark Wing-Davey as Zaphod Beeblebrox and Sandra Dickinson as Trillian. The voice of the guide is by Peter Jones. Simon Jones, Peter Jones, Stephen Moore and Mark Wing-Davey had already provided the voices for their characters in the original radio series in 1978/80. In addition, the series features a number of notable cameo roles, including Adams himself on several occasions.

Although initially thought by BBC executives to be unfilmable, the series was successfully produced and directed by Alan J. W. Bell and went on to win a Royal Television Society award as Most Original Programme of 1981, as well as several BAFTA awards for its graphics and editing.

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx


The episode opens with a guide entry explaining the legendary planet of Magrathea, which manufactured planets millions of years ago, until the Galactic economy collapsed. Zaphod has been explaining to Ford that he has found the legendary planet of Magrathea, whilst Trillian tends to a pair of white mice. Zaphod orders the computer to land on the planet surface.

Before long, they receive a transmission from the Commercial Council of Magrathea, informing them that the planet is closed for business and asking them to leave. They ignore this and later receive another message, noting that nuclear missiles have been sent at the ship. Attempts to evade the missiles fail, and Arthur uses the ship's Infinite Improbability Drive, which ends up turning the missiles into a very surprised looking whale and a bowl of petunias. Trillian discovers that during the chaos, her mice escaped.

The five characters go onto the surface, where they find it desolate. Zaphod suggests that the Magratheans lived beneath the surface of the planet. They split into two groups — Trillian, Zaphod and Ford explore a tunnel, whilst Arthur and Marvin remain on the surface. Trillian, Zaphod and Ford's thread ends on a cliff-hanger, with them seeing something alarming at the end of the corridor.


HHGTTG 3 ( 232mb)

01 Episode 3 31:02

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

before

HHGTTG 1 ( 232mb)
HHGTTG 2 ( 232mb)

Jun 6, 2012

RhoDeo 1223 HHGTTG 2


Hello, well i've fallen victim to a nasty ransom virus, it means my working pc is out of order for the time being. This back up pc i got from the bedroom isn't synced, no passwords and shit and windows was doing 68 updates, sound not working, in short i need my regular machine back. That however i a very complicated proces according to what i've been able to discern, a very nasty piece of trojan virus that escaped my scanner. As things stand i suppose a clean reinstall looks the fastest way to get back. Yet having to do some more i don't expect to be fully up and running again before the weekend.

I do have an episode of the Hitchhikers Guide to keep your spirits up

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Here is the BBC television adaptation of Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy broadcast in January and February 1981 on BBC Two. The adaptation follows the original radio series in 1978 and 1980. The series stars Simon Jones as Arthur Dent, David Dixon as Ford Prefect, Mark Wing-Davey as Zaphod Beeblebrox and Sandra Dickinson as Trillian. The voice of the guide is by Peter Jones. Simon Jones, Peter Jones, Stephen Moore and Mark Wing-Davey had already provided the voices for their characters in the original radio series in 1978/80. In addition, the series features a number of notable cameo roles, including Adams himself on several occasions.

Although initially thought by BBC executives to be unfilmable, the series was successfully produced and directed by Alan J. W. Bell and went on to win a Royal Television Society award as Most Original Programme of 1981, as well as several BAFTA awards for its graphics and editing.



The episode opens with a recap of the story, with Ford and Arthur about to be captured. After being read Vogon poetry, they are thrown out of an airlock and improbably rescued by the Starship Heart of Gold, which has been stolen by Ford's semi-cousin Zaphod Beeblebrox, accompanied by Trillian, a young woman who Arthur once met at a party. Ford and Arthur are escorted to the bridge by Marvin the Paranoid Android and meet Zaphod and Trillian. The episode ends after they are introduced, with no cliffhanger.


HHGTTG 2 ( 232mb)

01 Episode 2 34:55

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

before

HHGTTG 1 ( 232mb)

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Jun 3, 2012

Sundaze 1223


Hello, as the brits prepare to celebrate their 'lizard' queen who after 60 years still seems reluctant to let go, I fully expect her to go for 75 years, after all she'd only be 100 by then and would have seen off most subjects alive at her crowning.  Looks like the weather won't play ball though, it's more like March this weekend, a dreary perspective for the party. Oh well the dead come back to dance here....

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Dead Can Dance (sometimes referred to as DCD) were an ambient, world music band which formed in Melbourne, Australia, in August 1981. Its mainstays were Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry. The band relocated to London in May 1982 and disbanded in 1998, but reunited temporarily for a world tour in 2005. Their 1996 album Spiritchaser reached No. 1 on the Billboard Top World Music Albums Chart. Australian music historian Ian McFarlane described Dead Can Dance as having an ambient style of world music that "constructed soundscapes of mesmerising grandeur and solemn beauty... with African polyrhythms, Gaelic folk, Gregorian chants, Middle Eastern mantras and art-rock".

Dead Can Dance formed in Melbourne, Australia, in August 1981 with Paul Erikson on bass guitar, Lisa Gerrard (ex-Microfilm) on vocals, Simon Monroe (Marching Girls) on drums and Brendan Perry on vocals and guitar. Gerrard and Perry were also a domestic couple and they left Erikson and Monroe in Australia when they moved to London in May 1982, where they signed with alternative rock label 4AD Records. With the duo, the initial United Kingdom line-up were James Pinker, Scott Rodger and Peter Ulrich. The group's debut album, Dead Can Dance, which appeared in February 1984, was produced by the band. The artwork, which depicts a ritual mask from New Guinea, "provide[s] a visual reinterpretation of the meaning of the name Dead Can Dance". The album "featured drum-driven, ambient guitar music with chanting, singing and howling".They followed with a four-track extended play, Garden of the Arcane Delights in August.which saw them plunging into a wider range of music and style, in fact it set them on their musical style.

For their second album, Spleen and Ideal, the group comprised the core duo of Gerrard and Perry with cello, trombones and tympani added in by session musicians. It appeared in November 1985 and was co-produced by the duo with John A. Rivers Raggett describes it as "a consciously medieval European sound ... like it was recorded in an immense cathedral". The group built a following in Europe, and this album reached No. 2 on the UK indie charts. By 1989, Gerrard and Perry had separated domestically – Gerrard returned to Australia and Perry moved to Ireland – but they still wrote, recorded and performed together as Dead Can Dance.

For the next two years, Dead Can Dance were relatively quiet, releasing only two new songs in 1986, both which appeared on the 4AD compilation Lonely Is an Eyesore. Within the Realm of a Dying Sun, the group's third album, appeared in 1986. In 1988, the band released their fourth album, The Serpent's Egg, and wrote the score for the Agustin Villarongas film El Nino de la Luna, which also featured Lisa Gerrard in her acting debut. Aion, Dead Can Dance's fifth album, was released in 1990. Also in 1990, the group toured America for the first time, earning rave reviews. The following year, the group was involved in various festivals and theatrical productions. In 1991, the compilation A Passage in Time was released on Rykodisc, making it the first American release of Dead Can Dance music. Early in 1993, the group provided the score to Baraka and contributed songs to Zazou's Sahara Blue.

Their sixth studio album, Into the Labyrinth, was issued in September 1993 and dispensed with guest musicians entirely; it sold 500,000 copies worldwide and appeared on the Billboard 200. It was a cult success throughout the U.S. and Europe, making them 4AD's highest selling act.They followed with a world tour in 1994 and recorded a live performance in California which was released as Toward the Within, with video versions on Laserdisc and VHS (later on DVD). Many unofficial bootlegs of concerts spanning their career exist, containing several rare songs that were only performed live. Toward the Within is the duo's only official live album. Gerrard released her debut solo recording, The Mirror Pool, and recombined with Perry for the Dead Can Dance studio album, Spiritchaser, in 1996.The album also charted on Billboard 200 and reached No. 1 on the Top World Music Albums Chart.

In 1998, Dead Can Dance planned a follow-up to Spiritchaser, but the band separated before it was realised. One song from the recording sessions, "The Lotus Eaters", was eventually released on the box set Dead Can Dance (1981-1998) and on the 2-disc compilation Wake (2003). Gerrard teamed with Pieter Bourke (Snog, Soma) to issue Duality in April 1998. Perry released Eye of the Hunter in October 1999. DCD reunited in 2005 and released limited-edition recordings of 13 shows from its European tour, and 8 recordings from the subsequent North American tour, as well as a compilation titled Selections from Europe 2005. These concerts were recorded and released on The Show record label.

On 28 March 2010, in an interview for Bulgaria’s Katehizis.com online music magazine, Perry revealed the possibility of a future Dead Can Dance reunion: "Yes, I’ve been talking about it with Lisa [Gerrard]. Maybe in the end of next year we’ll start work again. We’ve been talking about doing something like taking a small chamber orchestra – 10 or 15 people – and tour with them. And we have to write songs. We have to write new material – totally new – so the whole, entire set will be a new album. Then we’ll go into the studio after the tour, record, produce and release a record as well.

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

With its two sides split between Perry and Gerrard's vocal efforts, Within the Realm of a Dying Sun serves as both a display for the ever more ambitious band and a chance for the two to individually demonstrate their awesome talents. Beginning with the portentous "Anywhere Out of the World," a piece that takes the deep atmospherics to a higher level with mysterious, chiming bells, simple but effective keyboard bass and a sense of vast space, the album finds Dead Can Dance on a steady roll. Once again a range of assistant musicians provide even more elegance and power to the band's work, with a chamber string quartet plus various performers on horns, woodwind, and percussion. Impressive though the remainder of the first side is, Gerrard's showcase on the second half is even more enveloping and arguably more successful. The martial combination of drums and horns that start "Dawn of the Iconoclast" call to mind everything from Wagner to Laibach, but Gerrard's unearthly alto, at its most compelling here, elevates it even higher. "Cantara" is no less impressive, a swirling, drum-heavy song that sounds equally inspired by gypsy dancing, classical orchestras and any number of Arab musical traditions.


Dead Can Dance - Within The Realm Of A Dying Sun (flac  248mb)

01 Anywhere Out Of The World 5:07
02 Windfall 3:30
03 In The Wake Of Adversity 4:14
04 Xavier 6:16
05 Dawn Of The Iconoclast 2:06
06 Cantara 5:58
07 Summoning Of The Muse 4:55
08 Persephone (The Gathering Of Flowers) 6:35

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Perry and Gerrard once again did the business with Aion. Its cover taken from Bosch, Aion's medievalism was worn more openly than ever before, with songs adapted from centuries-old material. The beautiful, entrancing "Saltarello," with lead performance by what sounds like an old wind instrument, comes from an Italian dance of the 14th century, while the mysterious moods of "The Song of the Sibyl" derive from 16th-century Catalonia. The group's command of not merely recording possibilities but of musical traditions, instruments, and more from around the world was arguably never stronger. Gerrard's vocals in particular have an even stronger, richer feeling than before, not merely able to command with its power but softly calm and seduce. Perry, meanwhile, is no less compelling, his ever-strong, wonderful voice perfectly suited to his choice of material. The standout track is "Fortune Presents Gifts Not According to the Book" with lyrics from a Spanish poet. The musical combination of softly plucked guitar and buried organ drone is striking enough, swathed in reverb, but when Perry steps in with his vocals, matched by more sparkling keyboards, the result is yet another high point for a band laden with them. Guest performers once again assist throughout.


Dead Can Dance - Aion (flac  214mb)

01 The Arrival And The Reunion 1:39
02 Saltarello 2:34
03 Mephisto 0:54
04 The Song Of The Sybil 3:46
05 Fortune Presents Gifts Not According To The Book 6:04
06 As The Bell Rings The Maypole Spins 5:17
07 The End Of Words 2:06
08 Black Sun 4:57
09 Wilderness 1:24
10 The Promised Womb 3:24
11 The Garden Of Zephirus 1:19
12 Radharc 2:49

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

 It all begins with yet another jaw-dropper from Gerrard, "Yulunga (Spirit Dance)," with keyboards and her octave-defying voice at such a deep, rich level that it sweeps all before it. Wordless as always but never without emotional heft, the song slowly slides into a slow but heavy percussion piece that sounds a bit like "Bird" from A Passage in Time, but with greater impact and memorability. As the album slowly unwinds over an hour's length, the two again create a series of often astounding numbers that sound like they should be millennia old, mixing and matching styles to create new fusions. Perhaps even more impressive is that everything was performed solely by Perry and Gerrard -- no outside guests here, and yet everything is as detailed, lush, and multifaceted as many of their past albums. New classics from the band appear almost track for track: Gerrard's a cappella work on "The Wind That Shakes the Barley," the gentle beauty of "Ariadne," the rhythmic drive and chants of the title song. The conclusion is a slightly surprising but quite successful cover -- "How Fortunate the Man With None," an adaptation of a classic Bertolt Brecht tune about the turn of fortune's wheel. Given a restrained arrangement and Perry's singing, it brings Labyrinth to a satisfying end.


Dead Can Dance - Into The Labyrinth (flac  383mb)

01 Yulunga (Spirit Dance) 6:56
02 The Ubiquitous Mr. Lovegrove 6:17
03 The Wind That Shakes The Barley 2:52
04 The Carnival Is Over 5:26
05 Ariadne 1:56
06 Saldek 1:07
07 Towards The Within 7:10
08 Bird 5:03
09 Tell Me About The Forest (You Once Called Home) 5:44
10 The Spider's Stratagem 6:41
11 Spirit 4:58
12 Emmeleia 2:06
13 How Fortunate The Man With None 9:15

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

elsewhere

I + Garden Of The Arcane Delights (EP) (84  116mb)
Spleen And Ideal (85  89mb)

Dead Can Dance - The Serpent's Egg (ogg 82mb)
Dead Can Dance - Spiritchaser (96  122mb)

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Jun 2, 2012

RhoDeo 1222 Beats


Hello, some German beats today, serious beats as Germans tend to take the intellectual approach when they put their minds to what their doing, this has given them a label of lacking spontaneity. Todays Germans however do display plenty of sense of humor, rumor has it they were born on the same day and hospital, years later they met and began a band together. Time to check them out ..N'Joy

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Mouse on Mars is one of the few electronic bands to stand the test of time. Constantly reinventing themselves, they have taken electronica to new heights with a unique blend of sound annihilation, fragmented melodies and an impassioned hatred of conformity. For nearly two deacades, Andi Toma and Jan St. Werner have sweated over burning consoles to create a new musical language, only to twist it again into thousands of myriad distortions.

German post-techno duo Mouse on Mars is among a growing number of electronic music groups dabbling in complex, heavily hybridized forms that include everything from ambient, techno, and dub to rock, jazz, and jungle. The combined efforts of Andi Toma and Jan St. Werner (of Köln and Düsseldorf, respectively), Mouse on Mars formed in 1993, working from Werner's studio, the pair fused an admiration for the early experiments of Krautrock outfits like Can, Neu!, Kluster, and Kraftwerk into an offbeat update including influences from the burgeoning German techno and ambient scenes. A demo of material found its way to London-based guitar-ambient group Seefeel, who passed it on to the offices of their label, Too Pure.

MOM's first single, "Frosch," was released by the label soon after and was also included on their debut album, Vulvaland. Immediately hailed for its beguiling, inventive edge that seemed to resist all efforts at easy "schublade" ("pigeonhole"), Vulvaland was reissued in 1995 by (oddly) Rick Rubin's American Recordings label, which also released their follow-up, Iaora Tahiti, soon after. More upbeat and varied than their debut, the album made some inroads into the American marketplace, but the group's somewhat challenging complexity and steadfast refusal to pander make widespread popularity unlikely. They returned in 1997 with three different releases -- the EP Cache Coeur Naif, the LP Autoditacker, and the vinyl-only Instrumentals. Another vinyl-only release (Glam) appeared in 1998, and was followed a year later by the "official" follow-up to Autoditacker, Niun Niggung.

Mouse On Mars' sound links them to the club-music scene, as do their many remixes and collaborations with members of the dance-music world. Yet their association with the formalized and utilitarian world of dance music is ironic, as the band’s raison d’etre is to place electronic flies in any aural ointment they choose to muck through.  Although remixes are rare, Mouse on Mars began appearing with increasing frequency on compilations of experimental electronic music, including Volume's popular Trance Europe Express series.

Idiology, which introduced percussionist/collaborator Dodo Nkishi into the fold, followed in 2000 on Thrill Jockey. In 2004, the duo celebrated a decade's worth of work with the release of Radical Connector and a global tour, which was captured by 2005's concert album Live04. The following year's hard-hitting Varcharz was released by Ipecac. St. Werner also has recorded as half of the duo Microstoria (with Oval's Markus Popp) and solo as Lithops. Following Varcharz, the duo kept busy with other projects, both collaborative and solo, including their work with Mark E. Smith as Von Südenfed, St. Werner's duties as the artistic director of Amsterdam's Institute for Electronic Music, and Toma's productions for Stereolab, Junior Boys, and Moondog. The pair reconvened as Mouse on Mars for 2011's Paeanumnion, an electronically processed live orchestral piece for which they created their own music software. This software was also crucial in crafting 2012's Parastrophics, which returned to the textural interplay and mischievous avant-electro-pop for which the duo was acclaimed.

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

A wibbly, barely digital match of ambient texturology with experimental strains of techno, dub, and Krautrock. While the flip relies too heavily on four-on-the-floor ambient house clichés, the A-side is a prize, cultivating a weird, electronics-based avant-pop vibe as successful as it is unique.
I've cut up Katang here as the final 17 min contain 2 hidden tracks, this whole hidden track thing was a fad one came across now and then, luckily this nonsense has stopped these days.


Mouse On Mars - Vulvaland   (flac 332mb)

01 Frosch 9:18
02 Elli Im Wunderland 5:28
03 Uah 6:59
04 Chagrin 6:15
05 Future Dub 7:32
06 Die Seele Von Brian Wilson 7:43
07 Katang 11:31
08 Hidden Track 1 3:23
09 Hidden Track 2 6:04

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

More upbeat and with far greater detail than the debut, Iaora Tahiti proves Jan St. Werner and Andi Toma haven't stood still. The pair's fondness for all things lo-fi follows them here, but just as evident is a depth and punch lacking in their earlier material. Jungle-style programming pops up on the first single, "Bib," as well as elements of dub, funk, industrial, film soundtracks, and musique concrète.


Mouse On Mars - Iaora Tahiti   ( flac 364mb)

01 Stereomission 4:32
02 Kompod 4:05
03 Saturday Night Worldcup Fieber 4:19
04 Schunkel 5:00
05 Gocard 3:54
06 Kanu 5:57
07 Bib 5:59
08 Schlecktron 4:59
09 Preprise 1:35
10 Papa, Antoine 6:51
11 Omnibuzz 4:33
12 Hallo 3:59
13 Die Innere Orange 12:38

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Autoditacker finds Mouse on Mars continuing to grow and improve, adding textures and detail to their dense, electronic soundscapes without compromising their sound. They still are indebted to Krautrock and dub, but they continue to add new sounds and styles to their music, including long ambient stretches and flirtations with drum'n'bass. There are no silent moments on Autoditacker -- every inch of the tape is filled with rhythms, keyboards, and electronic squiggles. Each listen reveals new layers of the group's intricate arrangements, and the shifting instrumentation and themes recall the best adventurous jazz in terms of unpredictability. It's another stunning record in a distinguished, inventive catalog.


Mouse On Mars - Autoditacker  ( flac 343mb)

01 Sui Shop 5:09
02 Juju 4:57
03 Twift Shoeblade 4:23
04 Tamagnocchi 5:33
05 Dark Fx 3:22
06 Scat 4:52
07 Tux & Damask 5:01
08 Sehnsud 6:32
09 X-Flies 6:11
10 Schnick Schnack Meltmade 6:01
11 Rondio 4:52
12 Maggots Hell Wigs 6:47

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx

elsewhere Now in Flac

Mouse On Mars - Niun Niggung   ( ' 99 * 286mb )

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx