Jun 30, 2014

RhoDeo 1426 Cabin P 12

Hello, another day at the office for some, it was a try out for the Worldcup in Qatar, somewhat cooler in Fortaleza so what do those FIFA devils cook up for the teams competing, let's play midday at 38 C !  To the Dutch this is hotter than it's ever been in their country, the Mexicans have seen those temps before but they don't take a siesta for nothing. The game in the end less static as one would expect the Dutch taking it very slow the first half, the Mexicans wasted energy and were lucky not getting a penalty against them. Second half they scored early so the Dutch had to attack as the Mexicans retreated further and further but then in the 88th minute their fear was rewarded when the Dutch equalized, being on the up they kept on coming and with an attacker as Robben a penalty is always on the cards and so Huntelaar got to crown his first 15 min in the tournament with the winning goal. Amazing run the Dutch have, the Mexicans disappointed me somewhat. So tonight it was the surprise package Costa Rica against the Greek that bizarrely lucky advanced to the last 16 after a last minute penalty thanks to a referee black out. It wasn't the best of games it went to penalties after Greece had had one more man on the pitch for almost an hour. The Costa Ricans scored every penalty the Greek missed one, a deserved win for the smallest nation still at the worldcup, they get to chase Robben next...

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Cabin Pressure is a radio situation comedy series written by John Finnemore. Its first series was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008. The show follows the exploits of the oddball crew of the single aeroplane owned by "MJN Air" as they are chartered to take all manner of items, people or animals across the world. The show stars Stephanie Cole, Roger Allam, Benedict Cumberbatch and John Finnemore.

The principal cast, the 4-person crew, is the following:

As part of her last divorce settlement, Carolyn Knapp-Shappey (Stephanie Cole) received a mid-size (16 seat) jet aeroplane named "GERTI" (a "Lockheed McDonnell 312", registration G-ERTI). As a result, she founds her very own single plane charter airline, "MJN Air" ("My Jet Now"), which is crewed by an oddball mixture of characters who fly to various cities around the world, encountering a variety of situations.

The airline's only Captain, Martin Crieff (Benedict Cumberbatch), has wanted to be a pilot since he was six years old (before which he wanted to be an aeroplane). He suffers, however, from a distinct lack of natural ability in that department. He was rejected by at least one flight school, and had to put himself through the required coursework, barely qualifying for his certification – on his seventh attempt. He took the job with MJN for no salary at all, as long as he could be Captain. He appears to have no outside interests beyond flying. He is a stickler for procedures and regulations, but is more prissy than pompous. At the end of series two he tells Douglas that he survives financially by running a delivery service using the van he inherited from his father (running two different jobs largely explaining the lack of hobbies). This was his only inheritance (apart from a tool kit and multimeter) because his father believed he would waste any money he received trying to become a pilot. He has two siblings, Caitlin, now a traffic warden and Simon, a council administrator who often frustrates Martin with his annoying superiority. This isn't helped by his Mother's constant admiration of Simon, often saying that "Simon knows best".

First Officer Douglas Richardson (Roger Allam) is, on the other hand, a quite competent pilot who worked for Air England – until he was fired for smuggling. He chafes at his subordinate position to Martin, and misses no opportunity to flaunt his superiority in the younger pilot's face. In later episodes, it is revealed that Douglas, ashamed of his second-rate job, dresses in Captain's uniform for his wife Helena's benefit, changing to First Officer's uniform before he gets to work. Douglas is, however, something of a smooth operator who knows all of the dodges available to airline officers, and enjoys taking part in all of them.

Carolyn's son Arthur Shappey (John Finnemore) is an eager and cheery dimwit aged 29, who is supposed to be the flight attendant but usually manages to get in everyone's way. He is half-English and half-Australian; Carolyn is his English mother, and Gordon, Carolyn's ex-husband, his Australian father (original owner of Gertie). Arthur is a relentless optimist, whose biggest claim to fame is being the inventor (or at least discoverer) of fizzy yoghurt (the recipe for which is yoghurt plus time). He also celebrates Birling day, Birling day eve, Gertie's birthday and Summer Christmas, and is a definite polar bear enthusiast and expert. He is very allergic to dragon fruit and strawberries, but frequently forgets, having eaten strawberry mousse on occasion.

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Cabin Pressure - 206 Limerick (ogg 25mb)

206 - Limerick 28:00

MJN are flying an insufferably long flight to Limerick with the comforts of an unpleasant-filled box, Arthur's spot-check method of learning the phonetic alphabet, Douglas and Martin's game of evil-sounding names and some creative limericks.

previously

Cabin Pressure - 101 Abu Dhabi (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 102  Boston (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 103  Cremona (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 104  Douz (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 105  Edinburgh (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 106  Fitton (ogg 25mb)

Cabin Pressure - 201  Helsinki (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 202  Gdansk (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 203  Ipswich (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 204 Johannesburg (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 205 Kuala Lumpur (ogg 25mb)


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Jun 29, 2014

Sundaze 1426

Hello, well talk of lucky Brazil a slightly less forcefull strike in the last minute of extra time had seen the ball in the net and Brazil exit, as it happens it hit the crossbar, the sidebar didn't want to be left out and bounced out Chile's final penalty. To me Chile would have been deserved winners they outplayed Brazil for large parts of the second half. I doubt very much Columbia, that beat Uruguay thanks to James Rodriguez who scored both goals, will make life as difficult for the Brazilians as Chile did, no it's up to France or most likely Germany to block it's path to the final.

Today we remain in one of our worlds coldest countries, best known for it once world dominating mobile phone until Apple muscled itself in, Nokia. It's the source country for one of the worlds best operating systems (and free ) Linux. They produce coolheaded racing drivers.  Born 1985 in Finland, and curretly living in Amsterdam, Netherlands. "I try my best to capture moments and spaces. Subtle melodies and progression, sense of space, and warmth are close to my heart." .....N'Joy

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Vladislav Delay is one of the pseudonyms of Sasu Ripatti (born 1976), a Finnish electronic musician. A Helsinki producer whose "clicks + cuts" style of ambience under the moniker of Vladislav Delay he has recorded excellent work for three of Europe's most challenging electronic labels: Chain Reaction, Mille Plateaux, and Thomas Brinkmann's Max.Ernst. He grew up trained in jazz and still counts Philly Joe Jones -- the fiery drummer for the first Miles Davis Quintet -- one of his prime influences. Also before entering the world of electronics, Delay took side trips through the music of the globe (Brazilian, Cuban, African). After a few failed experiments with fusing electronics in a band environment, he began producing on his own and grew to love the mid-'90s developments by German labels Chain Reaction, A-Musik, Mille Plateaux, and others. Sasu has been involved in the ambient music, glitch, house, and techno genres. His method of track production involves a mixture of synthesizing, vocal recording and live reprocessing. Many tracks have an organic feeling that pervades through rolling, dubby basslines and vocal snippets. His partner is Antye Greie, with whom he has collaborated. Their daughter was born in 2006.

It would be hard to overstate the importance of dub in electronic music, but it's also easy to take for granted. Part of that owes to how literally dub gets invoked by those most closely associated with it: When the likes of Pole or Rhythm & Sound show their devotion to the dub methodology they hold dear, it tends to come out sounding more or less like re-versioned reggae. Drums fan out over bulbous bass-lines, tempos skew slow, melodies grow lazy and warm, and so on. Sasu Ripatti is less literal. Under his working guises as Luomo, Uusitalo, and Vladislav Delay, the Finnish producer has allied with dub as both a method and a mindset. It starts with the interrelation of his three personae, which itself functions as a sort of dub gesture. But it's most evident in the way he trips and rubs each and every element of his sound as it transpires, whether under the schedule of house (cf. Luomo), techno (Uusitalo), or dub that wanders out of line.

After a series of experimentations during 1996-1997 (later released, as by Conoco, on the Kemikoski full-length), his first release was the Kind of Blue EP, released in 1998 on his Huume label. During 1999, Delay released singles on Max.Ernst and Chain Reaction, leading to his album debut, Ele, on the Australian label Sigma Editions. In early 2000, two more full-lengths followed; first, Chain Reaction released Multila, then Entain appeared on Mille Plateaux. Before the end of the year, Delay had debuted a housier incarnation, Luomo, with the Vocalcity LP for Forcetracks. Anima (2001), Demo(n) Tracks (2004), The Four Quarters (2005), and Whistleblower (2007) were followed by two 12" remix singles based on the album track "Recovery Idea." He also released another Luomo album called Convivial, as well as its follow-up remix 12" for "Love You All." To top it all off, Delay issued a new recording of his propulsive tech-house project Uusital entitled Karhunainen.

Vladislav Delay's Tummaa full-length was released in 2009, as well as the final part of the "Recovery Idea" series of remixes and the "Tessio" single from Convivial; a subsequent remix of the track by Ramon Tapia was released later in the year. Ripatti's 2011 was no less prolific. In May, the full-length self-titled band recording Vladislav Delay Quartet was issued on Honest Jon's, followed by the solo Delay release of Vantaa later in the year on Raster-Noton. He also appeared on the Moritz Von Oswald recording Horizontal Structures, and released another Luomo single entitled "Good Stuff."

Ripatti's music is renowned for its sophisticated textural qualities. His sonic approach relies heavily on a semi-random element, and many undulating, complementary and sometimes conflicting layers interplay throughout most of his music. A de-constructive element is sometimes detected within the music as Ripatti makes comment on established genres within his various releases. Characteristic traits within Ripatti's music are sometimes a deep or bubbling synth-bass line, fractured and syncopated percussion - often placed freely within the music, long delay repetitions of various sounds, syncopated use of vocal samples, and complicated digital effect processing techniques. Generally, the music has a very spacious and organic sound, and albums such as "Anima" feature a very simple theme repeated with an array of musical and rhythmical interjections.

Ripatti releases under different names have conceptually varied, but have sonically related qualities; this may be due to Ripatti's different composition techniques. Uusitalo releases are often anchored by a house beat and highlight rhythmic variation (see 2007's Karhunainen). Vladislav Delay releases, on the other hand (see 2000's Multila), explore rhythmically sparse, experimental and ambient techno-dub soundscapes. Works under the Luomo name feature uncommonly wrought dance-floor ready vocal house.

Ripatti has released EPs and albums on labels such as Raster-Noton, Force Tracks, Chain Reaction, Mille Plateaux, Resopal, and Sigma Editions. He also founded the Finnish music label Huume Recordings. From 2009 onwards Ripatti has been performing drums and percussion in the Moritz von Oswald Trio alongside Moritz von Oswald and Max Loderbauer. With the Moritz von Oswald Trio he has released two albums and a live LP. He has also released an album in 2011 with his own experimental jazz/electronic group, the Vladislav Delay Quartet.

He was chosen by Animal Collective to perform at the All Tomorrow's Parties festival that they curated in May 2011

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Originally released in 2001 with the legendary Mille Plateaux label, Vladislav Delay’s Anima marked a shift for the noted electronic whiz kid with the many monikers. Gone, in large part, were the well-choreographed, sequencer-led compositions of old, replaced by live instruments, long takes, and a minimum of post-production and overdubs.

The word 'anima' is a psychological term meaning essentially 'an inner feminine part of the male personality'.  Both the artwork, a pastel enshrouded woman, and music, demure and beautiful, perfectly reflect these qualities.  The disc is indexed as a single 62 minute track, a continuous organic flow that constantly, unpredictably shifts gears while retaining recurrent themes and coherence.  Delay's sound set is a vast, atmospheric sonic sandbox of arctic synth pads, low end blips and throbs, fragments and smears of fractured audio and an expansive selection of percussive minutiae.  Melody and rhythm are sometimes more implied than expressed, allowing for your brain to fill in the blanks, and at other times coalesce effortlessly, flawlessly and gracefully all on their own.  Stagnation is the enemy as a few notes of wash background are about the only element allowed to loop for any great length of time.  The piece ends by gradually, almost unwillingly, dissolving and fading away finally concluding with a crash and sampled dialogue ... "I might never go to sleep again, I might stay awake forever!"  Absolutely gorgeous.  Pure genius.  Yet another masterpiece.



Vladislav Delay - Anima  (flac 347mb)

01 Anima 62:08
02 Anima (Version) 10:11

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An official live recording released in commemoration of Vladislav Delay's headlining performance at the 2001 Ars Electronica festival (September 1-6), Naima is more fascinating for the moment it captures than the actual musical performance itself. Recorded less than a year after Mille Plateaux had released Delay's sprawling Anima album, this performance purportedly harks back to that piece for its source material. However, you probably wouldn't guess that from listening to the hourlong performance. In fact, there are few overt references to Anima; rather, there are momentary allusions to aspects of Anima, but for the most part, Naima is a drastic reworking (hence the anagrammatic title) that is more notable for its lyrical allusions to Delay's work as Luomo. The Luomo allusions come via guest vocalist AGF (aka Antye Greie-Fuchs, billed here as "Girlfriend"), who highlights Delay's ambient dub ramblings with her trademark spoken word ramblings that uncoincidentally quote freely at times from "Tessio," a much-celebrated Luomo track much at odds with this featured performance. It's this blurring of distinctions that makes Naima somewhat of a puzzling curiosity piece: it's billed as a Delay performance, though it's actually more of an AGF one; it's purportedly based on Anima source material, though that's less than obvious; and the Luomo allusions further blur the line between what you'd expect from this performance and what you're in fact presented with. The end result is less than essential, but Delay completists (as well as AGF ones) will certainly want to seek out this somewhat hard-to-track-down album, which was released by the Cologne-based Staubgold label. As an addendum, it's worth noting that the CD packaging is quite well done, providing ample documentation of the annual Ars Electronica festival that began in 1979 and was held annually at Klangpark, otherwise known as Donaupark, a picturesque park in Linz, Austria, that straddles the Danube River.



Vladislav Delay - Naima  (flac 217mb)

01 Naima - Live 42:08

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Is there anybody doing as much with dub these days as Sasu Ripatti? The tricks and tenets of the form have been so integrated into different realms of music production that they're simply part of the weather. Disembodied echoes, horizontal smears, transfigurations of details into plot-points and vice versa-- all such things are base elements that owe to the days when reggae producers started wondering what might be hiding between the wires in their mixing desks.

The last one is what plays on Whistleblower, the eighth album credited to Vladislav Delay. The sounds are the same as they've always been: miasmic synth tones, rubbery kick-drums that stutter and tap, weird whirligigs given to tumbling around what could well be a big washing machine filled with an irradiated syrup of significant thickness. They're basically the same sounds that Ripatti mines as Luomo and Uusitalo, minus any veritable rites of rhythm.

As Luomo has grown evermore sensuous and inviting, the common knock against the work of Delay is that it's all a big tease. (Who could resist the desire to hear Luomo when he's so close at hand?) But while the tease does in fact taunt in tracks that rarely build beyond a lumbering yawn, the Luomo aura helps as much as it hurts, mostly by making Delay's dubby hesitations and ambient lack of pacing resonante all the more for the decisions they imply. When a series of pounding sounds wanders into a 12-minute track like “Wanted To (Kill)", what initially scans as arbitrary carpentry noise falls into a hypnotic pulse, in part because you're listening for it. Likewise the barely-suggested sound of a voice cut up in "Stop Talking"-- the mere chance that it might turn into a lush chorus in the fashion of Luomo makes it sneak into an ear all the deeper.

That's not to say that Whistleblower isn't worthwhile on its own terms. Few producers have as varied a store of sounds to draw on as Ripatti. And he never just plugs them in, which proves all the more evident when he's at his slowest and most patient. It's a wonder to hear how he tweaks and customizes every little fidget in "I Saw a Polysexual," just as it's stirring to hear when he pulls back to haunt in "Lumi." You could fashion a Venn diagram to make sense of the effects as they relate to Luomo and Uusitalo, or you could just draw a circle and stay inside.



Vladislav Delay - Whistleblower (flac  336mb)

01 Whistleblower 9:44
02 Wanted To (Kill) 12:20
03 Stop Talking 9:12
04 I Saw A Polysexual 9:19
05 Lumi 5:24
06 He Lived Deeply 12:54
07 Recovery IDea 10:00

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Jun 28, 2014

RhoDeo 1425 Grooves

Hello, as the Worldcup finished the first round no real surprises perhaps Algerians keeping the Russians at bay but they like the Koreans and Japanese lack creativity, so it's goodbye to them. Ronaldo can lick his wounds and those Ghanians really fell apart, quiet unnecessary. Meanwhile some withdrawal symptoms today--no matches, thankfully tomorrow starts another cycle with 8 matches in 4 days, by that time there will be 8 teams left.  Gone already is Luis Suarez whose streetwise character overtakes him at times, and as was to be expected his minimal byte cost him dearly as the screaming british press draws blood once more, talk of sore losers...


These weeks it's all about "Soul Brother Number One," "the Godfather of Soul," "the Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite" -- those are mighty titles, but no one can question that today's artist earned them more than any other performer. James was a guy who had self motivation written all over his back and front. And it came out of every pore of his music. His rhythms,the conversational way his band interacted with himself and each other and the way each one of them was able to make music that made people move. At this time dancing wasn't a mere gut reaction to rhythmic music. It was a political statement. So when we're dealing with funk and dancing it's on a level somewhat closer to jazz and swing. It's movement connected with a CULTURAL movement itself. So when you hear something like this,the grooves make you want to move. Than the movement will get your mental juices going. A big undertaking for one man to carry but than he wasn't alone, he had some great musicians backing and sometimes leading him the JB's was one of those supporting casts ......N'joy

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The J.B.'s were the legendary supporting cast of musicians behind James Brown, earning a well-deserved reputation as the tightest, best-drilled instrumental ensemble in all of funk. The name J.B.'s is most often associated with three hornmen in particular -- saxophonists Maceo Parker, Alfred "Pee Wee" Ellis, and trombonist Fred Wesley, all of whom originally joined Brown's backing band at various points during the '60s. As a recording entity unto themselves, however, The J.B.'s enjoyed a distinctly defined heyday from 1970-1975, under the musical directorship of Wesley (though Brown, naturally, remained a strong presence). The J.B.'s were billed under a variety of alternate names on their own singles and albums -- Fred Wesley and the J.B.'s, Maceo and the Macks, Fred and the New J.B.'s, the James Brown Soul Train, the Last Word, the First Family, and more. The core group of personnel, despite some turnover on the periphery, remained fairly steady from 1971 on, at least until Brown's creative downturn precipitated several important defections.

The first official version of The J.B.'s was formed in 1970, after the notoriously demanding Brown's regular band (excepting organist/vocalist Bobby Byrd) walked out on him. Caught in a pinch, Brown recruited a Cincinnati-based R&B band called the Pacemakers, who'd already toured behind Brown favorite Hank Ballard. Brothers Phelps "Catfish" Collins (guitar) and William "Bootsy" Collins (bass) anchored the lineup, as well as the first J.B.'s single, 1970's "The Grunt." The Collins brothers, of course, would play a crucial role in Brown's transition to heavy, groove-centered funk. One by one, some of Brown's previous bandmembers returned to the fold, including Fred Wesley, who accepted Brown's offer to become musical director of The J.B.'s in December 1970. However, the lineup splintered with the departure of the Collins brothers just a few months later, leaving Wesley with only guitarist Hearlon "Cheese" Martin, drummer John "Jabo" Starks, and tenor saxman St. Clair Pinckney. This nucleus was quickly fleshed out with bassist Fred Thomas and saxophonist Jimmy Parker (who'd never played alto prior to joining the band); soon, there was also a trumpet section, usually featuring Jerone "Jasaan" Sanford, Russell Crimes, and Isiah "Ike" Oakley.

Brown began to release recordings by the newly constituted J.B.'s on his own People label with some frequency beginning in 1971, and the group scored a couple of Top 40 R&B hits with "Pass the Peas" and "Gimme Some More." By 1972, previous Brown guitarist Jimmy Nolen had returned alongside Cheese Martin, and conga player Johnny Griggs was back in tow as well. That year saw the release of the first J.B.'s full-length, Food for Thought. Wesley was still the band's only real soloist, so in early 1973, Brown convinced legendary alto man Maceo Parker to rejoin. His first record back with the group was "Doing It to Death," a long jam with guest vocals from Brown that topped the R&B charts in edited form; it was also the title track of their second album, and the first single credited to Fred Wesley & the J.B.'s, affirming that Wesley was still without question the leader. Still, The J.B.'s also began to cut sides under the name Maceo & the Macks, including the Top 20 R&B hit "Soul Power '74" and the 1974 album Us!!. Meanwhile, under their original name, the Wesley-led J.B.'s released another successful LP that year in Damn Right I Am Somebody, which spun off three Top 40 R&B hits in "Same Beat," "If You Don't Get It the First Time, Back Up and Try It Again, Party," and the title track. The follow-up album, Breakin' Bread, issued later that year, was credited to Fred and the New J.B.'s, even though the band's personnel remained essentially the same (although John Morgan was easing into Starks' slot as the regular drummer).

By late 1974, however, Brown's commercial momentum was beginning to slow, and that carried over to The J.B.'s as well. The First Family single "Control (People Go Where We Send You)," which featured Brown, Lyn Collins, and other vocalists, failed to perform up to expectations. By the time of 1975's Hustle With Speed album, band morale was low, and Wesley was growing frustrated with Brown's sudden loss of direction. On the Fourth of July, Wesley quit the group to join up with George Clinton, and Maceo Parker soon followed. Bassist Thomas, drummers Starks (who'd joined B.B. King's band) and Morgan, guitarist Martin, and saxophonist Jimmy Parker all drifted away, leaving Jimmy Nolen and Russell Crimes the only consistent members left on the final J.B.'s single, 1976's "Everybody Wanna Get Funky One More Time." Polydor subsequently shut down Brown's People imprint, effectively ending the myriad side projects he'd managed during the first half of the decade. He continued to tour with differing versions of The J.B.'s, including a late-'70s outfit dubbed the J.B.'s International, but for all intents and purposes, the true J.B.'s no longer existed.

Periodic J.B.'s reunions ensued in the years to come; Wesley, Parker, and Alfred Ellis (who actually only played on a couple of J.B.'s sessions) toured Europe with Bobby Byrd in 1988, and cut a reunion album, Pee Wee, Fred and Maceo, the following year. They continued to tour and record together off and on during the '90s under the name the JB Horns. A more extensive J.B.'s reunion took place in 2002 on the album Bring the Funk On Down, which also included Bootsy Collins, Bobby Byrd, and Jabo Starks, among others. A reunion of the original J.B.'s rhythm section, with Bootsy and Phelps Collins, Clyde Stubblefield, and Jabo Starks, and supplemented by Bernie Worrell, recorded the Superbad movie soundtrack. They went on to perform the first tribute concert remembering James Brown. And released Funk Your Ass (A Tribute to The Godfather Of Soul) in 2008.

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This album came out in 1973 with James Brown and the JB's at a significant peak. This was the era of Soul Train,which I'm pretty sure is where this cover photo is from. That song and most of what James was doing in this period was associated with the salad days of all that. James was entering what Ricky Vincent calls the "united funk era",a time when the funk music he helped innovate was the primary and most successful form of soul music at that time. James and The JB's were very lucky to be still at their peak together when the genre they helped to create was at it's most successful point. And I'm glad to report,whatever format you have this album in (mine is vinyl actually) again you just want to turn it on and have it never end.

The title song is.....well for James Brown fans what more can I say?It drives "the one" directly into the subconscious. For the most part this album is more slow grinding, non stop JB funk such as "More Peas",again same deal as the title song yet slower even in the groove. "La Di Da La Di Day" has the band working full throttle again-all playing off each other like the well oiled funk music machine they are. "Sucker" has them working out on an eight minute bop jazz style jam. You hear Maceo and Fred interacting with each other in this pointed musical conversation,proving the old point the JB's were really "playing jazz with a raw rhythm attitude". "You Can Have Watergate,Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight" is sort of a glue that holds the album together via interludes. But the full version that closes the album is some pointed, topical funk that's still relevant now even with the somewhat dated historical reference. Money talks,BS walks basically.



The J.B.'s - Doing It To Death  (flac 211mb)

01 Introduction To The J.B.'s 0:24
02 Doing It To Death - Part 1 & 2 10:01
03 You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight 0:14
04 More Peas 8:25
05 La Di Da La Di Day 5:38
06 You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight 0:14
07 Sucker 8:09
08 You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight 6:28

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Damn Right I Am Somebody captures the J.B.'s at the apex of their extraordinary powers. This James Brown-produced set is both their most fiercely polemical and their most musically daring, incorporating otherworldly electronic elements, eccentric time and rhythm shifts, and idiosyncratic studio effects to brilliantly articulate the increasing turmoil and insanity of the times. It's quite possibly the most challenging record ever released under the Brown aegis, favoring open-ended grooves and epic solos rooted in avant-jazz. The rhythms remain surgically precise and hypnotically intense, however, and every cut here, from the funk juggernaut "I'm Payin' Taxes, What Am I Buyin'?" to the righteously mellow "Same Beat," is a marvel. This is funk at its heaviest -- musically, yes, but intellectually as well.



The JBs - Damn Right I Am Somebody  (flac 264mb)

01 Damn Right I'm Somebody 6:01
02 Blow Your Head 5:06
03 Im Payin' Taxes, What Am I Buyin '? 9:48
04 Same Beat (Part 1) 3:19
05 If You Don't Get It The First Time, Back Up & Try It Again, Parrty 3:56
06 Make Me What You Want Me To Be 3:58
07 Going To Get A Thrill 6:22
08 You Sure Love To Ball 4:38

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In addition to backing Brown on stage and on record during this era, the J.B.'s also recorded albums and singles on their own, sometimes with Brown performing on organ or synthesizer. Their albums were generally a mixture of heavy funk tracks and some more jazz-oriented pieces. Nearly all of their recordings were produced by Brown and most were released on his own label, People Records. Like most of James Brown's music, the J.B.'s recorded output has been heavily mined for samples by hip hop DJs and record producers. Groove Machine this 1979 trend-setting disco funk album steps way outside the box, as the James Brown produced J.B. s lay down a disco groove that will make you get up off that thang and dance like a white boy. Don't miss out on this thumping disco classic!



The J.B.'s - Groove Machine  (flac 260mb)

01 Rock Groove Machine 9:00
02 Georgia Peach Disco 10:16
03 Just Wanna Make You Dance 8:08
04 Rock Disco #1 7:23
05 Rock 4:30

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Jun 26, 2014

RhoDeo 1425 Goldy Rhox 166

Hello, as the groups wrap up Argentina's Messi joined Brazil's Neymar on the topscoring list during their win on Nigeria that nevertheless advances to the second round for a meeting with France that seemed uninterested in scoring today so a 0-0 makes them groupwinner followed by Switzerland who's Robben stand-in at Bayern, Shaqiri scored the worldcups first hattrick. Clearly Honduras has been the weakest team in competition, meanwhile Ecuador has been badly punished from that undeserved extra time winner by the Swiss that sees them through and Ecuador home.

Today the 166th post of GoldyRhox, classic pop rock, as the Worldcup plays out these weeks i thought it fitting to show in the darklight today a Brazilian rock/reggae band, begun in 1991, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. As of 2004, they had sold approximately 5,200,000 copies of their albums. Initially intending to mix dancehall with traditional Brazilian styles, later the band changed its sonority to music closer to pop and local movement Clube da Esquina. In 1983, Samuel Rosa (guitars, vocals) and Henrique Portugal (keyboards) started to play in a reggae band called "Pouso Alto", along with Dinho Mourão (drums) and his brother Alexandre (bass). In 1991, Pouso Alto arranged for a performance in São Paulo, but due to the Mourão brothers not being in Belo Horizonte, bassist Lelo Zaneti and drummer Haroldo Ferretti were called for the gig. The band premiered on June 5, 1991, and due to the performance competing with the Campeonato Paulista final match, the audience was 37 people. After the show, the group changed its name to 'mystery', inspired by Bob Marley's song "Easy skanking", and began to perform regularly at "Mister Beef" churrascaria in Belo Horizonte.

After playing for some time in churrascarias, bars and clubhouses, the band spent US$10,000 in their first album, released as an independent CD in late 1992 with 3,000 copies, fully paid by the band members themselves. In 45 days, 1,200 were sold, and Sony Music signed the band as the first Brazilian act in its Chaos label. The debut album was re-released in April 1993. The singles "O Homem Que Sabia Demais", "Tanto" (version of Bob Dylan's "I Want You") and "In(Dig)Nação" took the group on a 120 concerts tour around Brazil, and the album sold 250 thousand copies. Today's mystery album (1994) was the first record produced by Dudu Marote. "É Proibido Fumar", "Te Ver", "Pacato Cidadão", "Esmola" and "Jackie Tequila" were hits, and it sold around 1,200,000 copies. O Samba Poconé was released in 1996. The album had three big hits, "Tão Seu", "É Uma Partida de Futebol", included by FIFA in the official soundtrack for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, and "Garota Nacional" which topped the Spanish charts for three months. It took the group on tour in Argentina, Chile, United States, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Portugal. The album sold 1.8 million copies.

Siderado, produced by John Shaw (UB 40) and Paul Ralphes, begins the band's movement towards a more rock and roll sound. Released in 1998, it sold 750 thousand copies. Daúde and Uakti participated as guest artists. With Maquinarama, the band begins in earnest its move away from the ska and reggae sound towards a more rock oriented one influence by The Beatles, Clube da Esquina, Britpop and contemporary alternative rock. Maquinarama, produced by Chico Neves and Tom Capone and released in July 2000, sold 275 thousand copies. In 2001, they recorded the first live album in Ouro Preto as part of the MTV Brasil's series "MTV Ao Vivo". MTV Ao Vivo sold 600 thousand copies. Besides a list of hits chosen by fans through their website, the album had the new song "Acima do Sol", a national hit. In 2002 Samuel Rosa played acoustic guitar in "É Proibido Fumar", from the Acústico MTV (MTV Unplugged) by Roberto Carlos.

They've released a steady stream of albums since Cosmotron (2003), Radiola (2004), Carrossel (2006), Estandarte (2008), Multishow ao Vivo (2010) On June 19, 2010, Skank performed a free concert on the Mineirão stadium in Belo Horizonte. It was the last event before the venue was closed to reform in order to accommodate the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The show was recorded for the live album and DVD Multishow Ao Vivo - Skank no Mineirão, which featured two new songs, "De Repente" and "Fotos na Estante" . The band never invested much in its international career. Some songs received versions in Spanish, such as "Chica Nacional" ("Garota Nacional"), and "Respuesta" ("Resposta"), but foreign shows are usually in places with many Brazilians, such as Miami and New York City.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Today's mystery album, the second released in 1994, with its 1,100,000 copies sold, helped them to sell 2.6 million CDs in 1996. The album is named after a folkloric rhythm of the home state of its members, Minas Gerais. The calango is a cutting contest between two singers who improvise verses and is absorbed, amidst liberties, in "A Cerca." The band also re-recorded the Roberto Carlos hit "É Proibido Fumar." Social criticism is present in "A Esmola," one of the songs that had its authorship claimed by the Bahian poet Ajax, who suited the band. The album works wonderfully in the dance tracks mixing rock, reggae, dancehall, and even baião.




Goldy Rhox 166   (flac 239mb)

Goldy Rhox 166   (ogg 105mb)


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Jun 25, 2014

RhoDeo 1425 Aetix

Hello, Worldcup report, it's all about the small nations at the World cup Costa Rica (twice the happiest nation on the planet) and Uruguay (fully legalized marijuana earlier this year) have less the 8 million citizens-together, but it's soccer players saw off England and Italy. Alas the British press has started a new hounding of Suarez as he sort of planted his upper teeth into a nasty Italian defender alas the picture of the 'deed' shows absolutely no residue, expect FIFA to give him a 2 year ban as those corrupt assholes see a chance to be lauded by the British press that has been hounding them. A London centric press that would love to chase Suarez out of Liverpool and into the arms of Barca. In the other poule the smallest nation went thru as well Greece played by far their best game, but if those naive Ivorians had kept their cool and showed a clinical finishing they would have progressed as it happened an extra time penalty send them home. Meanwhile Columbia humiliated Japan with their B team and are doing surprisingly well despite having to do without their top striker Falcao. They will be favorite in their 1/8th final match with Uruguay.

Today at Aetix an experimental rock music group formed in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1975. Despite many long-term band members, singer David Thomas is the only constant. While the band have never been widely popular—usually categorized as "underground rock"—they have a devoted following and are an influential and critically acclaimed band. They have compiled a list of guidelines for touring, live performances and the like: "Lighting should be theatrical rather than rockist. We are interested in atmosphere, mood, drama, energy, subtlety, imagination—not rock cliché." There's some strung stuff to get thru, 5 albums compiled on 3 cdees what can i say   ....N'joy !

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Pere Ubu emerged from the urban wastelands of mid-'70s Cleveland to impact the American underground for generations to follow; led by hulking frontman David Thomas, whose absurdist warble and rapturously demented lyrics remained the band's creative focus throughout their long, convoluted career, Ubu's protean art punk sound harnessed self-destructing melodies, scattershot rhythms, and industrial-strength dissonance to capture the angst and chaos of their times with both apocalyptic fervor and surprising humanity. Named in honor of Alfred Jarry's surrealist play Ubu Roi, Pere Ubu was formed in the autumn of 1975 from the ashes of local cult favorite Rocket from the Tombs, reuniting Thomas (aka Crocus Behemoth) with guitarist Peter Laughner; adding guitarist Tom Herman, bassist Tim Wright, keyboardist Allen Ravenstine, and drummer Scott Krauss, the group soon issued their debut single, "30 Seconds Over Tokyo," on Thomas' Hearthan label. The follow-up, "Final Solution," appeared on the renamed Hearpen in early 1976, and resulted in a series of live dates at the famed New York City club Max's Kansas City.

Laughner's longstanding battles with drugs and alcohol forced his exit from Pere Ubu in June of 1976; within a year, he was dead. The group continued on as a quintet, with bassist Tony Maimone signing on in the wake of Wright's move to New York, where he joined the pioneering no wave band DNA. In the wake of their third single, "Street Waves," Thomas was approached by Mercury label A&R exec Cliff Burnstein, who convinced the label to form a new imprint, Blank Records, for the express purposes of signing Pere Ubu; their debut LP, The Modern Dance, was issued in early 1978, and although the record made little commercial impact at home or abroad, its manic intensity and dark impenetrability proved profoundly influential on countless post-punk acts on both sides of the Atlantic. The follow-up, Dub Housing, was even better, pushing the band to further extremes of otherworldliness, but already the cracks were beginning to show, and upon completing 1979's New Picnic Time (working title: "Goodbye"), Ubu disbanded. Although the group re-formed months later, Herman opted not to return and was replaced by Red Krayola mastermind Mayo Thompson.

The Art of Walking followed in 1980, with subsequent tours in support of the record heralding the increasingly pop-centric sound that would distinguish later Ubu projects; a live record, 390° of Simulated Stereo, appeared a year later. Krauss was replaced by drummer Anton Fier for 1982's Song of the Bailing Man, but as before personal and creative differences began taking their toll and Ubu again disbanded; while Maimone and Krauss reunited in the group Home and Garden, Thomas continued the solo career he'd begun with the 1981 effort The Sound of the Sand (And Other Songs of the Pedestrians), a collaboration with guitar virtuoso Richard Thompson. He recorded 1987's Blame the Messenger with the Wooden Birds, a backing band including fellow Ubu alums Ravenstine and Maimone; after Krauss sat in for a Cleveland live date, the decision was made to begin working as Pere Ubu again. Guitarist Jim Jones and drummer Chris Cutler were also recruited for 1988's comeback effort The Tenement Year, a vividly idiosyncratic pop album far more accessible than anything in the band's back catalog.

1989's Stephen Hague-produced Cloudland further refined the approach, with the video for the single "Waiting for Mary" even earning limited MTV airplay; after both Ravenstine and Cutler exited Pere Ubu (the former becoming a commercial airline pilot), one-time Captain Beefheart sideman Eric Drew Feldman was installed for 1991's Worlds in Collision. Feldman soon departed as well to join Frank Black, and the remaining quartet recorded 1993's Story of My Life for the short-lived Imago label; Maimone was the next to go, with bassist Michele Temple and keyboardist Garo Yellin stepping in for 1995's planned swan song, Ray Gun Suitcase. As Ubu again slipped into limbo, the band's massive influence was celebrated in 1996 with the release of the five-disc box set Datapanik in the Year Zero; the renewed interest spurred Thomas back into action, and he reunited with Tom Herman for the first time in two decades to record 1998's sprawling Pennsylvania (also featuring holdovers Jones and Temple in addition to keyboardist Robert Wheeler and drummer Steve Mehlman). Four years later, Pere Ubu captured some of their darkest and most theatrical work to date with St. Arkansas. Why I Hate Women followed in 2006. A remix album also arrived that year. In 2009, the band returned with Long Live Pere Ubu!, which featured songs from a musical adaptation of the band's namesake play Ubu Roi and included contributions from Communards' Sarah Jane Morris and Gagarin. Pere Ubu's next album, Lady from Shanghai, was nearly as ambitious; described as "an album of dance music fixed," it commemorated the 35th anniversary of The Modern Dance with abrasive, industrial-tinged rhythms and an accompanying book, Chinese Whispers: The Making of Pere Ubu's Lady from Shanghai.

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First came 4 more or less self released singles that are more than good enough to start of the compilation of their first steps into the despised musicworld. There isn't a Pere Ubu recording you can imagine living without. The Modern Dance remains the essential Ubu purchase (as does the follow-up, Dub Housing). For sure, Mercury had no idea what they had on their hands when they released this as part of their punk rock offshoot label Blank, but it remains a classic slice of art-punk. It announces itself quite boldly: the first sound you hear is a painfully high-pitched whine of feedback, but then Tom Herman's postmodern Chuck Berry riffing kicks off the brilliant "Non-Alignment Pact," and you soon realize that this is punk rock unlike any you've ever heard. David Thomas' caterwauling is funny and moving, Scott Krauss (drums) and Tony Maimone (bass) are one of the great unheralded rhythm sections in all of rock, and the "difficult" tracks like "Street Waves," "Chinese Radiation," and the terrifying "Humor Me" are revelatory, and way ahead of their time. The Modern Dance is the signature sound of the avant-garage: art rock, punk rock, and garage rock mixing together joyously and fearlessly.



Pere Ubu - First 4 Singles+The Modern Dance (75-77) ( flac 456mb)

01 30 Seconds Over Tokyo 6:21
02 Heart Of Darkness 4:44
03 Final Solution 4:58
04 Cloud 149 2:37
05 Untitled 3:32
06 My Dark Ages 4:00
07 Heaven 3:04
The Modern Dance
08 Nonalignment Pact 3:18
09 The Modern Dance 3:28
10 Laughing 4:35
11 Street Waves 3:04
12 Chinese Radiation 3:27
13 Life Stinks 1:52
14 Real World 4:00
15 Over My Head 3:49
16 Sentimental Journey 6:06
17 Humor Me 2:43
18 The Book Is On The Table 4:02

Pere Ubu - First 4 Singles+The Modern Dance (75-77)  (ogg 185mb)

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Though Pere Ubu's tenure on Mercury lasted one record, their departure for their unlikely home of Chrysalis (at the time the label of Jethro Tull) resulted in Dub Housing, widely considered their masterpiece. The title is an allusion to the echoes at rows of identical concrete public housing units in Baltimore, presumably reminiscent of the echo and reverberation that characterize dub reggae. Darker and more difficult than The Modern Dance (indicated by the cover's darkened apartment complex and stormy Cleveland skyline) with plenty of bleak soundscapes (e.g., "Codex"), Dub Housing also includes "Navvy"'s bouncy burble (featuring Thomas yelping "I have desires!"), and "(Pa) Ubu Dance Party"'s surreal big beat. Make no mistake, as much as Ubu indulged in arty dissonance and mucked about with song structure, this is very much a rock & roll record, albeit one made by a band interested in pushing the envelope when it came to sound, song construction, and performance. As much as this is a band effort, the guitar of Tom Herman and the synthesizer of Allen Ravenstine frequently stand out. Herman's strong, polished playing veers from assertive riffing to assaultive noise; Ravenstine, who may be one of the all-time great synth players, colors the sound with ominous whooshes of distortions, blips, and blurbs that sound like a sped-up Pong game. But, as is often the case with Ubu, it's David Thomas' singing (here at its most engagingly unrestrained) that is front and center. Part comic foil, part raging madman, Thomas utilizes all of his limited range in a whacked expressiveness built around hiccups, yodels, screeches, and, sometimes, singing. Dub Housing sold next to nothing and signaled the beginning of the end of Ubu's relationship with Chrysalis, but it remains an important and influential American rock record.

It was not surprising that after Dub Housing, Pere Ubu couldn't get a record released in the U.S. New Picnic Time originally surfaced on Chrysalis as a British import, but when Rough Trade made it available domestically, U.S. fans could take solace in that the band had finally hooked up with a label more sympathetic to their decidedly unique approach to music. New Picnic Time was also the last Ubu record with guitarist Tom Herman, and for many Ubu fans this signals the end of Pere Ubu phase one (or phase two, depending on one's feelings for the Datapanik-era band). New Picnic Time also finds David Thomas' lyrical explorations reflecting his religious involvement with the Jehovah's Witnesses, pieties that are stated quite emphatically on the record's closing track, "Jehovah's Kingdom Comes."



Pere Ubu - Dub Housing + New Picnic Time (1978-1979)  (flac 440mb)

Dub Housing
01 Navvy 2:40
02 On The Surface 2:35
03 Dub Housing 3:39
04 Caligari's Mirror 3:49
05 Thriller! 4:36
06 I Will Wait 1:45
07 Drinking Wine Spodyody 2:44
08 Ubu Dance Party 4:46
09 Blow Daddy-o 3:38
10 Codex 4:55
New Picnic Time
11 Have Shoes Will Walk (The Fabulous Sequel) 3:16
12 49 Guitars And One Girl 2:51
13 A Small Dark Cloud 5:49
14 Small Was Fast 3:39
15 All The Dogs Are Barking 3:03
16 One Less Worry 3:49
17 Make Hay 4:03
18 Goodbye 5:18
19 The Voice Of The Sand 1:28
20 Hand A Face A Feeling 3:17

Pere Ubu - Dub Housing + New Picnic Time (1978-1979)  (ogg 91mb)

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The Art of Walking was the first Pere Ubu recording that wasn't completely sensational. Red Krayola guitarist/mastermind Mayo Thompson replaced Tom Herman, and while he freely indulges in pushing the envelope when it comes to soloing, he doesn't have Herman's rock sensibility, so there's less pulsating, Chuck Berry-style riffing emerging from the mix. Also, the songs are a tad more obtuse -- not that previous Ubu songs weren't, but this collection, with its focus on the pastoral, falls apart when it becomes overly precious. Such is the fate of utopian concept records. Still, this transitional (if you want to call it that) record offers many rewards, even if as a listener you have to work a little harder to find them.

Continuing in the spirit of The Art of Walking, Bailing Man marks the departure of drummer Scott Krauss (replaced by ex-Feelies Anton Fier), a fact significant in that when combined with the earlier departure of guitarist Tom Herman, means that at this juncture, Pere Ubu was more art and less rock. Why people were so knocked out by Fier is a mystery; here he lacks aggressiveness, plays behind the beat, and generally speaking, he doesn't push the band as hard as a drummer ought to. That said, Song of the Bailing Man is a fine, occasionally wonderful record that, at its slackest moments, sounds strained and forced, as if it were no fun to make, and it's this seriousness (instead of the usual Ubu silly seriousness) that prevents Song of the Bailing Man from being great. It's no surprise that the band went on a hiatus for six years after the release of this record, returning with 1988's The Tenement Year.



Pere Ubu - The Art Of Walking / Song Of The Bailing Man (81/82)  (flac 412mb)

The Art Of Walking 
01 Go 3:35
02 Rhapsody In Pink 3:34
03 Arabia 4:59
04 Young Miles In The Basement 4:19
05 Misery Goats 2:38
06 Loop 3:15
07 Rounder 3:23
08 Birdies 2:26
09 Lost In Art 5:12
10 Horses 2:35
11 Crush This Horn 3:00
Song Of The Bailing Man 
12 The Long Walk Home 2:34
13 Petrified 2:16
14 Stormy Weather 3:20
15 West Side Story 2:46
16 Thoughts That Go By Steam 3:47
17 Big Ed's Used Farms 2:24
18 A Day Such As This 7:17
19 The Vulgar Boatman Bird 2:49
20 My Hat 1:19
21 Horns Are A Dilemma 4:21

Pere Ubu - The Art Of Walking / Song Of The Bailing Man (81/82)  (ogg 181mb)

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Jun 24, 2014

RhoDeo 1425 Roots

Hello, ah yes Mexico came second in their group thanks to a string of dubious referee decisions and is rewarded with a 1/8th final against Netherlands. They will be the big favorite as the match is played almost midday close to the equator where the average mid winter temperature is 29.4 C go figure. FIFA nasty people and the Brazilian organizers lack sense as well, i guess playing soccer under normal temps like in Rio should be reserved to the chanceless. Like every opponent of FIFA/Brazil, I would love to see Chile beat Brazil but such is not allowed with the unfairplay campaign of FIFA. Mexico is my favorite team now they will cruise up to the semis and then it's in the lap of the FIFA gods.

There's much more music in Nigeria besides Fela Kuti today in the spotlight two of the grand old men of the Nigerian music scene, who did much more then just make music, 4 titles for you to  ...N'joy

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Victor Uwaifo is a Nigerian musician, writer, sculptor, and musical instrument inventor, born in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria in 1941. He is famous for his joromi music. He records under the name Sir Victor Uwaifo. His best-known songs, "Guitar Boy" and "Mami water" were a huge hit in 1966. "Mami water" was inspired by an encounter (which he has long maintained actually occurred) with a "mami water" (mermaid) while lounging on Bar Beach in Lagos. He also served as commissioner for arts and culture in Edo State under the government of Lucky Igbinedion.

Uwaifo obtained his secondary school education at the Western Boys' High School Benin and St Gregory's College, Lagos, in the years 1957–1961. He studied graphics at Yaba College of Technology, Lagos and graduated in 1961–1963. He received a bachelor's degree first class honors and a master's degree from the University of Benin in 1994, where he studied fine and applied arts and majored in sculpture.
Early in his career, Victor Uwaifo was a member of Bobby Benson's Highlife band. Uwaifo made history in Nigeria when he won the first Golden record in Nigeria, West Africa and Africa (presented by Philips, West Africa) for his song "Joromi" in 1996. Victor Uwaifo, who has a total of 12 golden records to date, has traveled to many countries, including the United States, Russia, Japan, United Kingdom, Bulgaria, Romania, Germany, France, Hungary, Rome, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Togo, Benin Republic and others.

His song Joromi has legendary status among his fans and his performances are characterized by his ability to play the guitar with both his feet and also his tongue. The Federal Government of Nigeria, in appreciation of his talents and contributions to Nigeria honored him with a National Honors Merit in 1983. Uwaifo was the first professional musician in Nigeria to receive such an award. He is a Justice of the Peace and has served in many capacities. Uwaifo was also appointed as the Honorable Commissioner of Arts, Culture and Tourism and Member of the State Executive Council, the highest policy-making decision body in Edo State, 2001–2003.

In 1995, he was invited by the United Nations Staff Day International Committee to perform during the UN Golden Jubilee celebration. Uwaifo is cited in the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 1983 edition, documented in the "Who's Who in Nigeria", "Who's Who in Africa", "Who's Who in the Commonwealth", and "Men and Women of Distinction in the Commonwealth" sections. He is an Honorary Member of the Biographical Advisory Council, Cambridge, England, a member of both the Performing Right Society, and of the Advisory Board of American Heritage University, California, U.S.A.. Uwaifo is the Chairman of Joromi Organization, a multi-track recording and television studio in Benin City. He runs and manages an art gallery and the Victor Uwaifo Hall of Fame.

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One of the true enigmas of the Nigerian music scene, Sir Victor Uwaifo has been an instantly recognisable figure throughout his five decades in the music industry. He built his first guitar aged 12 and went on to be awarded Africa's first gold disc in 1969. His incessant energy have seen him record countless LP's and singles and become one of Nigeria's true superstars. A musician, poet, philosopher, sculptor, painter, ambassador and recently Commissioner for Culture, he has carved a unique place for himself in the history of African music. This compilation focuses on his 'Ekassa' period in the first half of the 1970's. These recordings were made after his return from Lagos to his home town of Benin City in Edo State at the start of the new decade. Uwaifo mixed the ancient culture of the Benin Obas with highlife & a dash of rock and soul to form his new style. Amazingly many of these cuts have remained unavailable since then... until now



Sir Victor Uwaifo - Guitar-Boy Superstar 1970-76  (flac  393mb)

01 Kirikisi 3:53
02 Igboroho 2:58
03 Idogo 7:15
04 Agho 3:34
05 Obodo Eyo 3:23
06 Mother Witch-Shu'husu'hu 3:30
07 Talking Instruments 3:09
08 Edenederio 5:17
09 Akuyan 3:11
10 Dododo (Ekassa # 1) 5:20
11 Do Lelezi 5:56
12 Atete 3:56
13 Happy Day From Me To You 2:48
14 Ebibi 5:10
15 Egbe Natete 3:36
16 Iye Iye Oh 3:05
17 Madaka 2:55
18 West African Safari 2:58

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Victor Uwaifo was the 1st Nigerian to win a golden record, here a tribute which marks out his remarkable musical achievements. Ekassa first released in the early seventies, features the maestro's inventive guitar work and own uniquely funky articulations of indigenous dance rhythms. Enjoy the timeless Uwaifo sound lovingly remastered to perfection. Came as bonus with Rough Guide to Psychedelic Africa album.



Victor Uwaifo and His Melody Maestroes - Talk Of The Town - Ekassa  (flac  222mb)

01 Ebibi Ekassa 28 5:19
02 Igiodo-giodo Ekassa 34 4:41
03 Isede Ekassa 31 3:57
04 Votumamuoga Ekassa 32 3:21
05 Aiworo Ekassa 25 2:29
06 Ame´Sihion-Segbe Ekassa 38 5:06
07 Kirikisi Ekassa 24 3:59
08 Akhuankhuan Ekassa 26 5:43
09 Sumwensowa Ekassa 35 3:45
10 Osulelemule Ekassa 29 3:06

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Peter King was born in 1938 in Enugu in the Southeastern region of Nigeria and grew up in Lokoja, Lagos and Port Harcourt. In 1957 he joined the Roy Chicago band in Ibadan, playing the Maracas and then the Conga drum. He moved to other bands in Ibadan and then Lagos, playing the double bass, drums and then the alto sax. In 1961 he went to London where he studied at various schools of music, including the Trinity College of Music. While in London, Peter King joined with drummer Bayo Martins and trumpeter Mike Falana to form the "African Messengers" group. The group performed at festivals and clubs, and served as backup band for acts like The Four Tops, The Temptations and Diana Ross. The African Messengers recorded many 45rpm records. "Highlife Piccadilly", a fusion of Highlife and Jazz was a hit. Peter King formed another band "The Blues Builders" with which he toured Europe and Northern Africa.

Peter King returned to Nigeria in 1969, and with his group "The Voice of Africa" performed on the war front during the Nigerian Civil War. Returning to London in 1971 he toured Europe, America and Japan with his group "Shango". He assembled and arranged a big band to back the singing group Boney M on their first live concert tour across Europe in 1977. He recorded nine studio albums between 1975 and 1978, and wrote music for several plays and television shows. In 1979 King returned to Nigeria and formed the P.K band. He composed music for soap operas and recorded three further albums. In the early 1980s Peter King and his P.K. Band played on the NTA and at the National Museum, Lagos for three years.

Peter King plays in the Sonny Rollins-Gene Ammons-John Coltrane tradition. He has a unique tone, flawless articulation and a fresh turn of mind in improvisations, and is the leading tenor saxophone voice to have come from the Nigerian highlife and afrobeat traditions. Talking of his hit "Highlife Piccadilly", Peter King said "Our philosophy was to play modern jazz with highlife as the basis ... Afrojazz is my musical direction and a mission". Peter King combined afrobeat with a funk style similar to James Brown. His "Shango" was acclaimed by critics. Opening with a simple flute melody, tambourines enter followed by complex duets between horns and looping guitar riffs.

Peter King founded his School of Music in 1982, in a three-room apartment in Maza Maza. At first it had about 30 students. Since then the College has expanded greatly, and is now located in Badagry. It has lecture halls, rehearsal rooms, an assembly-concert hall and hostel facilities. The school has been assisted by Canadian musicians Oliver Jones and Archie Allen and greatly assisted by the French government. Almost two thousand students have graduated from the school since 1982. The school provides practical tuition and grants certificates and diplomas. It prepares students for the professional examinations of Associate, Licentiate and Fellowship of the Trinity, Royal and London Schools of Music and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

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Composer and multi-instrumentalist is a seminal yet under-recognized artist on the Nigerian music scene of the 1970s. Though he recorded nine albums in Africa, the U.S., and U.K., Shango is the only one currently available. Recorded in 1974, King's Shango is a mixture of hard African rhythms, James Brown-styled funk, jazzed-up horn arrangements, and political messages. From the standpoint of the Lagos scene, the album is a classic of the period rivaling virtually anything that Fela or Tony Allen were putting across at the time. With King blowing deep-groove soul and out jazz saxophone solos above the chants, the music becomes a boiling pot of hip-shaking sexiness and rage. King being a formally trained musician outside of Nigeria (one of the schools he attended was the Berklee College of Music), his conception of harmony is revolutionary as he strides blues, R&B, soul, post-bop jazz, whole-tone variations, and counterpoint to edgily shift the focus of each tune on the set -- note the sweet soul blowing on "Prisoner of Law" that becomes a big band extrapolation of seven shades in the key of C. The title track choogles along, burning underneath with a series of percussive contrapuntal moves that accent a bassline already fragmenting under the power of the groove, and "Freedom Dance" takes the Brown ethic of overdriven funked-up brass aesthetics into territory that reflects both Eastern repetitive chanting and the gospel shout and roll of Ray Charles. There isn't a weak second here, not a maudlin note. Everything here is so deeply blue it's the brightest black you've ever heard.



Peter King - Shango  (flac  332mb)

01 Shango 5:40
02 Prisoner Of Law 5:41
03 Mr Lonely Wolf 6:55
04 Freedom Dance 4:14
05 Go Go's Feast 7:46
06 Mystery Tour 6:17
07 Now I'm A Man 3:37
08 Watusi 4:46

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"Omo Lewa by Nigerian born band leader and multi-instrumentalist Peter King came into the world in 1976. From start to finish, King weaves afrobeat, highlife, and jazz with mesmerizing skill. Long out of print, this album contains some of the prolific artist's finest work. Highlights like “Afro-Funk” and “Ajo” have been singeing slipmats via recent African compilations and whetting the appetites of numerous music fans. As prices on the collector's market reiterate, this pent up demand has made Omo Lewa Peter King's most sought after LP. In addition, overlooked tracks like “Omo Lewa,” “Eda,” and “Ko Dara” help solidify what is surely one of King's most consistently hard hitting records. Recorded in London, it marks the second release by King on Orbitone Records, a relationship spanning from 1975-1978 and yielding four studio albums. It signaled a further refinement of his arrangement and compositional skills, and exists in stark contrast to Miliki Sounds, his predominately highlife-centric Orbitone debut. Throughout a career spanning the late 1950s through today, King has maintained his roots in the Western African music he grew up with, while expanding his formal musical education in London at the Trinity School of Music, the same school both Ebo Taylor and Fela Kuti attended. The results are a rich sonic palette of funk, highlife, and jazz executed with the acumen and precision of a master. Following up our reissue of Peter King's African Dialects, we are thrilled to again be working directly with Orbitone Records and Peter King to bring this great record back into print.



Peter King - Omo Lewa  (flac 190mb)

01 Oma Lewa 5:19
02 Yere Africa 4:29
03 Afro Funk 3:53
04 Eda 3:03
05 Ajo 3:57
06 Congo 4:11
07 Ko Dara 3:33

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Jun 23, 2014

RhoDeo 1425 Cabin P 11

Hello, another night of football matches, like Argentina before them group favourites Belgium won again undeservedly, the Russians were lacking like those other collective societies Japan and Korea in an ability to close down and score. Specially the Korean public will have woken up monday morning looking at the score of what was their night game losing 4-2 to those Algerians, they are out and so is de facto Japan. Tonight they could have admired the can do U.S. that despite being less on paper out gunned the Portuguese, but paid the price for some late naivety and gave Ronaldo the chance to give a great pass across goal that was headed in 20 seconds before extratime was over 2-2 Alas i fear this won't help Portugal they'll be going home after their last game and i think their opponent Ghana will join them as their naivety cost them dearly against the US and Germany that will probably decide on a gentleman's draw for the last game ensuring both go through. Meanwhile FIFA is clamping down forcefully against any protest against them, we won't get to see any images of it as that too is under total control of those FIFA gangsters....

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Cabin Pressure is a radio situation comedy series written by John Finnemore. Its first series was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008. The show follows the exploits of the oddball crew of the single aeroplane owned by "MJN Air" as they are chartered to take all manner of items, people or animals across the world. The show stars Stephanie Cole, Roger Allam, Benedict Cumberbatch and John Finnemore.

The principal cast, the 4-person crew, is the following:

As part of her last divorce settlement, Carolyn Knapp-Shappey (Stephanie Cole) received a mid-size (16 seat) jet aeroplane named "GERTI" (a "Lockheed McDonnell 312", registration G-ERTI). As a result, she founds her very own single plane charter airline, "MJN Air" ("My Jet Now"), which is crewed by an oddball mixture of characters who fly to various cities around the world, encountering a variety of situations.

The airline's only Captain, Martin Crieff (Benedict Cumberbatch), has wanted to be a pilot since he was six years old (before which he wanted to be an aeroplane). He suffers, however, from a distinct lack of natural ability in that department. He was rejected by at least one flight school, and had to put himself through the required coursework, barely qualifying for his certification – on his seventh attempt. He took the job with MJN for no salary at all, as long as he could be Captain. He appears to have no outside interests beyond flying. He is a stickler for procedures and regulations, but is more prissy than pompous. At the end of series two he tells Douglas that he survives financially by running a delivery service using the van he inherited from his father (running two different jobs largely explaining the lack of hobbies). This was his only inheritance (apart from a tool kit and multimeter) because his father believed he would waste any money he received trying to become a pilot. He has two siblings, Caitlin, now a traffic warden and Simon, a council administrator who often frustrates Martin with his annoying superiority. This isn't helped by his Mother's constant admiration of Simon, often saying that "Simon knows best".

First Officer Douglas Richardson (Roger Allam) is, on the other hand, a quite competent pilot who worked for Air England – until he was fired for smuggling. He chafes at his subordinate position to Martin, and misses no opportunity to flaunt his superiority in the younger pilot's face. In later episodes, it is revealed that Douglas, ashamed of his second-rate job, dresses in Captain's uniform for his wife Helena's benefit, changing to First Officer's uniform before he gets to work. Douglas is, however, something of a smooth operator who knows all of the dodges available to airline officers, and enjoys taking part in all of them.

Carolyn's son Arthur Shappey (John Finnemore) is an eager and cheery dimwit aged 29, who is supposed to be the flight attendant but usually manages to get in everyone's way. He is half-English and half-Australian; Carolyn is his English mother, and Gordon, Carolyn's ex-husband, his Australian father (original owner of Gertie). Arthur is a relentless optimist, whose biggest claim to fame is being the inventor (or at least discoverer) of fizzy yoghurt (the recipe for which is yoghurt plus time). He also celebrates Birling day, Birling day eve, Gertie's birthday and Summer Christmas, and is a definite polar bear enthusiast and expert. He is very allergic to dragon fruit and strawberries, but frequently forgets, having eaten strawberry mousse on occasion.

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Cabin Pressure - 205 Kuala Lumpur (ogg 25mb)

205 Kuala Lumpur 28:01

Martin discovers a secret, illegal airfield pub frequented by Douglas and other airfield staff and can't decide whether to report it, as duty requires, or to turn a blind eye, as surprisingly everyone at the pub seems to like him. Meanwhile, Carolyn tries to improve Arthur's stewarding skills.

previously

Cabin Pressure - 101 Abu Dhabi (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 102  Boston (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 103  Cremona (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 104  Douz (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 105  Edinburgh (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 106  Fitton (ogg 25mb)

Cabin Pressure - 201  Helsinki (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 202  Gdansk (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 203   Ipswich (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 204 Johannesburg (ogg 25mb)


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Jun 22, 2014

Sundaze 1425

Hello, well Romero, Argentina's goalkeeper kept his country in the clear with some help from the ref who obviously didn't award the Iranians a deserved penalty. In the end enabling Messi to score the only goal in extra time. It is usual for coaches to change players towards the end but the Iranian coach unwittingly caused the concentration lapse that gave Messi the space he needed to find the net in the 91st minute, resulting in an another undeserved win for Argentina. Germany - Ghana was the match of the day, how the Ghanaians let themselves be beaten by the US the other day probably belongs to the mysteries of football. Anyway tonight they should have beaten Germany if only these Africans had kept their cool they would have, in the end they got 1 point for their effort 2-2, great game ! The last game today saw a referee mistake cause the exit of Bosnia by denyiing them a perfectly legal goal,. would have been 1-0 they hit the woodwork in extra time but in the end the victory for Nigeria was deserved 1-0. They will decide with Argentina who evades France in the next round.

Today we remain in one of our worlds coldest countries, best known for it once world dominating mobile phone until Apple muscled itself in, Nokia. It's the source country for one of the worlds best operating systems (and free ) Linux. They produce coolheaded racing drivers.  Yes we stay in Finland home of Sasu Ripatti. He has also recorded as Luomo, Sistol, Uusitalo and Conoco. Sasu has been involved in the ambient music, glitch, house, and techno genres. His method of track production involves a mixture of synthesizing, vocal recording and live reprocessing. Many tracks have an organic feeling that pervades through rolling, dubby basslines and vocal snippets. His main moniker is Vladislav Delay which is in the spotlight today and next week .....N'Joy

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Vladislav Delay is one of the pseudonyms of Sasu Ripatti (born 1976), a Finnish electronic musician. A Helsinki producer whose "clicks + cuts" style of ambience under the moniker of Vladislav Delay he has recorded excellent work for three of Europe's most challenging electronic labels: Chain Reaction, Mille Plateaux, and Thomas Brinkmann's Max.Ernst. He grew up trained in jazz and still counts Philly Joe Jones -- the fiery drummer for the first Miles Davis Quintet -- one of his prime influences. Also before entering the world of electronics, Delay took side trips through the music of the globe (Brazilian, Cuban, African). After a few failed experiments with fusing electronics in a band environment, he began producing on his own and grew to love the mid-'90s developments by German labels Chain Reaction, A-Musik, Mille Plateaux, and others.

He has also recorded as Luomo, Sistol, Uusitalo and Conoco. Sasu has been involved in the ambient music, glitch, house, and techno genres. His method of track production involves a mixture of synthesizing, vocal recording and live reprocessing. Many tracks have an organic feeling that pervades through rolling, dubby basslines and vocal snippets. His partner is Antye Greie, with whom he has collaborated. Their daughter was born in 2006.

After a series of experimentations during 1996-1997 (later released, as by Conoco, on the Kemikoski full-length), his first release was the Kind of Blue EP, released in 1998 on his Huume label. During 1999, Delay released singles on Max.Ernst and Chain Reaction, leading to his album debut, Ele, on the Australian label Sigma Editions. In early 2000, two more full-lengths followed; first, Chain Reaction released Multila, then Entain appeared on Mille Plateaux. Before the end of the year, Delay had debuted a housier incarnation, Luomo, with the Vocalcity LP for Forcetracks. Anima (2001), Demo(n) Tracks (2004), The Four Quarters (2005), and Whistleblower (2007) were followed by two 12" remix singles based on the album track "Recovery Idea." He also released another Luomo album called Convivial, as well as its follow-up remix 12" for "Love You All." To top it all off, Delay issued a new recording of his propulsive tech-house project Uusital entitled Karhunainen.

Vladislav Delay's Tummaa full-length was released in 2009, as well as the final part of the "Recovery Idea" series of remixes and the "Tessio" single from Convivial; a subsequent remix of the track by Ramon Tapia was released later in the year. Ripatti's 2011 was no less prolific. In May, the full-length self-titled band recording Vladislav Delay Quartet was issued on Honest Jon's, followed by the solo Delay release of Vantaa later in the year on Raster-Noton. He also appeared on the Moritz Von Oswald recording Horizontal Structures, and released another Luomo single entitled "Good Stuff."

Ripatti's music is renowned for its sophisticated textural qualities. His sonic approach relies heavily on a semi-random element, and many undulating, complementary and sometimes conflicting layers interplay throughout most of his music. A de-constructive element is sometimes detected within the music as Ripatti makes comment on established genres within his various releases. Characteristic traits within Ripatti's music are sometimes a deep or bubbling synth-bass line, fractured and syncopated percussion - often placed freely within the music, long delay repetitions of various sounds, syncopated use of vocal samples, and complicated digital effect processing techniques. Generally, the music has a very spacious and organic sound, and albums such as "Anima" feature a very simple theme repeated with an array of musical and rhythmical interjections.

Ripatti releases under different names have conceptually varied, but have sonically related qualities; this may be due to Ripatti's different composition techniques. Uusitalo releases are often anchored by a house beat and highlight rhythmic variation (see 2007's Karhunainen). Vladislav Delay releases, on the other hand (see 2000's Multila), explore rhythmically sparse, experimental and ambient techno-dub soundscapes. Works under the Luomo name feature uncommonly wrought dance-floor ready vocal house.

Ripatti has released EPs and albums on labels such as Raster-Noton, Force Tracks, Chain Reaction, Mille Plateaux, Resopal, and Sigma Editions. He also founded the Finnish music label Huume Recordings. From 2009 onwards Ripatti has been performing drums and percussion in the Moritz von Oswald Trio alongside Moritz von Oswald and Max Loderbauer. With the Moritz von Oswald Trio he has released two albums and a live LP. He has also released an album in 2011 with his own experimental jazz/electronic group, the Vladislav Delay Quartet.


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Shortly before Vladislav Delay became the toast of the ambient techno scene -- or at least the laptop scene -- the California-based Phthalo label quietly released some of his early recordings under the moniker Sistol. The eight tracks compiled on this eponymous album aren't as epic, adventurous, or daring as his later work for Force Inc, but they showcase a rudimentary style that would evolve with each of Delay's successive releases in the early '00s. The dubby beats and crackling textures that would become synonymous with Delay are here. Each of the tracks moves along rather briskly, driven by a strong undercurrent of surprisingly stable rhythms. Unlike Delay's more ambient recordings for Chain Reaction, these tracks don't wander toward unknown destinations. Rather, they stay on track and could almost work as dancefloor tracks. However, unlike Delay's more straightforward Luomo recordings for Force Tracks, these tracks eschew convention. There are no vocals and no melodies but rather muddled distortion and uncanny rhythms. Everything Delay would go on to do as a producer is here. In a way, you can view Sistol as the prototype for what lay ahead for Delay in the early '00s.



Sistol - Sistol  (flac 195mb)

01 Keno 4:03
02 Hac 8:02
03 Nuomo 5:10
04 Kaste 6:45
05 Haaska 5:38
06 Kelmi 9:16
07 Luomo 4:48
08 Kotka 10:21

Sistol - Sistol  (ogg 121mb)

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The debut release from Finland's Vladislav Delay appeared on the obscure Australian low-tech electronica label Sigma Editions in 1998 in a small pressing in handmade sleeves. The prolific experimental artist rose to becoming one of the most critically acclaimed electronic artists of the turn of the millennium, with releases on the Mille Plateaux, Chain Reaction, and Force Ink labels following this release in quick succession. A couple of the dub-inflected abstractions here surfaced on his Mille Plateaux debut the following year, but this album is his defining point-of-departure in defining a new hybrid dub, minimalism, IDM, post-techno music. His atmospheres are made of off-kilter, pulsing rhythms and textured loop experiments that are structured akin to avant-garde minimalist Steve Reich, yet have their roots in techno and house. There is a reduced and patient quality to this work that will appeal to fans of Oval, Thomas Brinkman, and Pole, and Vladislav Delay's music is as individual and refined as these artists.



Vladislav Delay - Entain  (flac 330mb)

01 Kohde 22:06
02 Untitled 1:37
03 Poiko 19:20
04 Notke 16:40
05 Ele 15:20
06 Untitled 1:38

Vladislav Delay - Entain   (ogg 162mb)

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Vladislav Delay's "Multila" is another aquatic sounding epic, much like Porter Ricks' "Biokinetics", except this heads even further into the murky depths. "Ranta" begins our journey, and sets the tone for the rest of the album with a heady mix of murky sounscapes and complex background noises. "Raamat" adds 4/4 beats along with ghostly synths, humming background noise and echoing sounds rising to the surface like bubbles. "Huone", clocking in at just over 20 minutes, starts with an abstract broken beat rhythm, gradually adding elements to form a complex minimal techno/house track that should appeal to fans of early Luomo material.

"Viite", "Karha" and "Pietola" are even better, the beats and bass gradually emerging from complex constructions of sound that descriptions just wouldn't do justice to. "Nesso" ends our journey with a floaty feel, giving the listener the impression of rising to the surface from the oceanic depths of the previous tracks. Various processes leave digits flying over a deep orange sea of light, one of the best albums of electronic music ever.



Vladislav Delay - Multila (flac  366mb)

01 Ranta 4:29
02 Raamat 7:16
03 Huone 22:05
04 Viite 7:44
05 Karha 11:48
06 Pietola 16:24
07 Nesso 3:12

Vladislav Delay - Multila  (ogg 180mb)

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Jun 21, 2014

RhoDeo 1424 Grooves

Hello, as the Worldcup heats up, England is going home, they got routed by the Premiership player of the year who couldn't fire on all cylinders but it was enough to see England go down, the slim chance they had left was undone by Costa Rica that won their second game against the odds and is now the first to qualify from a group they were expected to trail, Italy and Uruguay can fight over the other place. In what probably is the weakest groupe France degraded Switzerland that nevertheless are likely to go on as the other 2 teams Ecuador and Honduras are weak. I mentioned it before the top half of the draw is occupied by much much stronger teams as the bottom half, an un fucking believable difference. Courtesy of FIFA the most corrupt organisation on the planet run by mafiosi in expensive suits, time to end its existence and let its voting members fry in the desert.


These weeks it's all about "Soul Brother Number One," "the Godfather of Soul," "the Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite" -- those are mighty titles, but no one can question that today's artist earned them more than any other performer. Other singers were more popular, others were equally skilled, but few other African-American musicians were so influential over the course of popular music. And no other musician, pop or otherwise, put on a more exciting, exhilarating stage show: his performances were marvels of athletic stamina and split-second timing. He is ranked seventh on the music magazine Rolling Stone's list of its 100 greatest artists of all time. He's been very productive hence plenty to choose from, today 3 titles from his extensive live reportoire......N'joy

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Through the gospel-impassioned fury of his vocals and the complex polyrhythms of his beats, Brown was a crucial midwife in not just one, but two revolutions in black American music. He was one of the figures most responsible for turning R&B into soul and he was, most would agree, the figure most responsible for turning soul music into the funk of the late '60s and early '70s. After the mid-'70s, he did little more than tread water artistically; his financial and drug problems eventually got him a controversial prison sentence. Yet in a sense, his music is now more influential than ever, as his voice and rhythms have been sampled on innumerable hip-hop recordings, and critics have belatedly hailed his innovations as among the most important in all of rock or soul.

Brown's rags-to-riches-to-rags story has heroic and tragic dimensions of mythic resonance. Born into poverty in the South, he ran afoul of the law by the late '40s on an armed robbery conviction. With the help of singer Bobby Byrd's family, Brown gained parole and started a gospel group with Byrd, changing their focus to R&B as the rock revolution gained steam. The Flames, as the Georgian group was known in the mid-'50s, signed to Federal/King and had a huge R&B hit right off the bat with the wrenching, churchy ballad "Please, Please, Please." By that point, The Flames had become James Brown & the Famous Flames; the charisma, energy, and talent of Brown made him the natural star attraction.

 All of Brown's singles over the next two years flopped, as he sought to establish his own style, recording material that was obviously derivative of heroes like Roy Brown, Hank Ballard, Little Richard, and Ray Charles. In retrospect, it can be seen that Brown was in the same position as dozens of other R&B one-shot: talented singers in need of better songs, or not fully on the road to a truly original sound. What made Brown succeed where hundreds of others failed was his superhuman determination, working the chitlin circuit to death, sharpening his band, and keeping an eye on new trends. He was on the verge of being dropped from King in late 1958 when his perseverance finally paid off, as "Try Me" became a number one R&B (and small pop) hit, and several follow-ups established him as a regular visitor to the R&B charts.

Brown's style of R&B got harder as the '60s began; he added more complex, Latin- and jazz-influenced rhythms on hits like "Good Good Lovin'," "I'll Go Crazy," "Think," and "Night Train," alternating these with torturous ballads that featured some of the most frayed screaming to be heard outside of the church. Black audiences already knew that Brown had the most exciting live act around, but he truly started to become a phenomenon with the release of Live at the Apollo in 1963. Capturing a James Brown concert in all its whirling-dervish energy and calculated spontaneity, the album reached number two on the album charts, an unprecedented feat for a hardcore R&B LP.

Live at the Apollo was recorded and released against the wishes of the King label. It was this kind of artistic standoff that led Brown to seek better opportunities elsewhere. In 1964, he ignored his King contract to record "Out of Sight" for Smash, igniting a lengthy legal battle that prevented him from issuing vocal recordings for about a year. When he finally resumed recording for King in 1965, he had a new contract that granted him far more artistic control over his releases.

Brown's new era had truly begun, however, with "Out of Sight," which topped the R&B charts and made the pop Top 40. For some time, Brown had been moving toward more elemental lyrics that threw in as many chants and screams as they did words, and more intricate beats and horn charts that took some of their cues from the ensemble work of jazz outfits. "Out of Sight" wasn't called funk when it came out, but it had most of the essential ingredients. These were amplified and perfected on 1965's "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," a monster that finally broke Brown to the white audience, reaching the Top Ten. The even more adventurous follow-up, "I Got You (I Feel Good)," did even better, making number three.

These hits kicked off Brown's period of greatest commercial success and public visibility. From 1965 to the end of the decade, he was rarely off the R&B charts, often on the pop listings, and all over the concert circuit and national television, even meeting with Vice President Hubert Humphrey and other important politicians as a representative of the black community. His music became even bolder and funkier, as melody was dispensed with almost altogether in favor of chunky rhythms and magnetic interplay between his vocals, horns, drums, and scratching electric guitar (heard to best advantage on hits like "Cold Sweat," "I Got the Feelin'," and "There Was a Time"). The lyrics were not so much words as chanted, stream-of-consciousness slogans, often aligning themselves with black pride as well as good old-fashioned (or new-fashioned) sex. Much of the credit for the sound he devised belonged to (and has now been belatedly attributed to) his top-notch supporting musicians such as saxophonists Maceo Parker, St. Clair Pinckney, and Pee Wee Ellis; guitarist Jimmy Nolen; backup singer and longtime loyal associate Bobby Byrd; and drummer Clyde Stubblefield.

Brown was both a brilliant bandleader and a stern taskmaster, the latter leading his band to walk out on him in late 1969. Amazingly, he turned the crisis to his advantage by recruiting a young Cincinnati outfit called the Pacemakers featuring guitarist Catfish Collins and bassist Bootsy Collins. Although they only stayed with him for about a year, they were crucial to Brown's evolution into even harder funk, emphasizing the rhythm and the bottom even more. The Collins brothers, for their part, put their apprenticeship to good use, helping define '70s funk as members of the Parliament-Funkadelic axis.

In the early '70s, many of the most important members of Brown's late-'60s band returned to the fold, to be billed as the J.B.'s (they also made records on their own). Brown continued to score heavily on the R&B charts throughout the first half of the '70s, the music becoming more and more elemental and beat-driven. At the same time, he was retreating from the white audience he had cultivated during the mid- to late '60s; records like "Make It Funky," "Hot Pants," "Get on the Good Foot," and "The Payback" were huge soul sellers, but only modest pop ones. Critics charged, with some justification, that the Godfather was starting to repeat and recycle himself too many times. It must be remembered, though, that these songs were made for the singles radio jukebox market and not meant to be played one after the other on CD compilations (as they are today).

By the mid-'70s, Brown was beginning to burn out artistically. He seemed shorn of new ideas, was being out-gunned on the charts by disco, and was running into problems with the IRS and his financial empire. There were sporadic hits, and he could always count on enthusiastic live audiences, but by the '80s, he didn't have a label. With the explosion of rap, however, which frequently sampled vintage J.B.'s records, Brown became hipper than ever. He collaborated with Afrika Bambaataa on the critical smash single "Unity" and reentered the Top Ten in 1986 with "Living in America." Rock critics, who had always ranked Brown considerably below Otis Redding and Aretha Franklin in the soul canon, began to reevaluate his output, particularly the material from his funk years, sometimes anointing him not just "Soul Brother Number One," but the most important black musician of the rock era.

For the majority of his career, Brown carried around a strict drug and alcohol-free policy with any member in his entourage, including band members, firing people who disobeyed orders, particularly those who used or abused drugs and alcohol. Some members of Brown's vocal group the Famous Flames were fired due to alcohol use. Noting of the policy, some of the original members of Brown's 1970s band, The J.B.'s, including Catfish and Bootsy Collins, intentionally got high on LSD during a concert gig in 1971, causing Brown to fire them after the show because he had suspected them to be on drugs all along.

However, by the mid-1980s, it was alleged that Brown himself was using drugs. After meeting and later marrying Adrienne Rodriguez, she and Brown began using PCP ("angel dust"). The drug resulted in domestically violent outbursts from Brown and he was arrested several times for domestic violence against Rodriguez while high on the drug. Clearly Adrienne Rodriguez had a bad influence on him and his brain couldn't cope with drugs. In 1988, Brown's personal life came crashing down in a well-publicized incident in which he was accused by his wife of assault and battery. After a year skirting hazy legal and personal troubles, he led the police on an interstate car chase after allegedly threatening people with a handgun. The episode ended in a six-year prison sentence that many felt was excessive; he was paroled after serving two years.

Throughout the '90s Brown continued to perform and release new material like Love Over-Due (1991), Universal James (1992), and I'm Back (1998). While none of these recordings could be considered as important as his earlier work and did little to increase his popularity, his classic catalog became more popular in the American mainstream during this time than it had been since the '70s, and not just among young rappers and samplers. One of the main reasons for this was a proper presentation of his recorded legacy. For a long time, his cumbersome, byzantine discography was mostly out of print, with pieces available only on skimpy greatest-hits collections. A series of exceptionally well-packaged reissues on PolyGram changed that situation; the Star Time box set is the best overview, with other superb compilations devoted to specific phases of his lengthy career, from '50s R&B to '70s funk.

In 2004, Brown was diagnosed with prostate cancer but successfully fought the disease. By 2006, it was in remission and Brown, then 73, began a global tour dubbed the Seven Decades of Funk World Tour. Late in the year while at a routine dentist appointment, the singer was diagnosed with pneumonia. On December 25, 2006, Brown died at approximately 1:45 am EST (06:45 UTC) from congestive heart failure resulting from complications of pneumonia, at age 73, with his personal manager and longtime friend Charles Bobbit at his bedside. According to Mr. Bobbit, Brown stuttered "I'm going away tonight", and then Brown took three long, quiet breaths and fell asleep before dying.

After Brown's death, Brown's relatives and friends, a host of celebrities and thousands of fans attended public memorial services at the Apollo Theater in New York on December 28, 2006 and at the James Brown Arena on December 30, 2006 in Augusta, Georgia. A separate, private memorial service was also held in North Augusta, South Carolina on December 29, 2006, which was attended by Brown's family and close friends. Celebrities who attended Brown's public and/or private memorial services included Michael Jackson, Jimmy Cliff, Joe Frazier, Buddy Guy, Ice Cube, Ludacris, Dr. Dre, Little Richard, Dick Gregory, MC Hammer, Prince, Jesse Jackson, Ice-T, Jerry Lee Lewis, Bootsy Collins, LL Cool J, Li'l Wayne, Lenny Kravitz, 50 Cent, Stevie Wonder, and Don King, among others.


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James Brown is featured here with the then newly formed J.B.'s -- the maestro's second great band, including Bootsy Collins, Phelps Collins, Jabo Starks, Bobby Byrd, and Fred Wesley. Live at the Apollo had caught James Brown the '50s gospel/R&B singer; Love Power Peace captures James Brown the funkster. In the early '70s Brown turned up the funk, recording such litanies for Black America as "Ain't It Funky Now," "Sex Machine," "Give It Up or Turn It Loose," "Super Bad," "Get Up, Get into It, Get Involved," and "Soul Power." They're all here, along with revved-up, white-hot versions of the early- and middle-period classics. Brown had planned to release this as a triple album in 1971. When several bandmembers left shortly after it was recorded, Brown switched from King to Polydor Records, leading him to scrap it and record a new studio album instead. In 1992, Polygram decided to make the recording available for the first time.



James Brown - Love Power Peace  (flac 380mb)

01 Intro 1:12
02 Brother Rapp 3:03
03 Ain't It Funky Now 5:36
04 Georgia On My Mind 6:12
05 It's A New Day 2:53
06 Bewildered 4:19
07 Sex Machine 8:45
08 Try Me 2:24
09 Medley : Papa's Got A Brand New Bag / I Got You (I Feel Good) / I Got The Feelin' 1:30
10 Give It Up Or Turnit A Loose 5:14
11 It's A Man's Man's Man's World 5:43
12 Please Please Please 2:09
13 Sex Machine (Reprise) 0:39
14 Super Bad 5:08
15 Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved 2:07
16 Soul Power 4:25

James Brown - Love Power Peace   (ogg 129mb)

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This is the recording of Brown’s 1974 concert that was part of the build up to the “Rumble in the Jungle”, the famed boxing match between George Foreman and Muhammad Ali. This is, to my knowledge, the only post-Payback, pre-decline live album of Brown, and therefore it is absolutely essential. The sound quality is great-to-good throughout, and although sometimes the crowd cheering drowns out the band a little (especially, annoyingly enough, during “The Payback” and its reprise) all the musicians are loud and clear, and the only complaint is that maybe the horns are occasionally too screechy-sounding, but it is not a major problem. A bigger problem is that some of the tracks are edited together rather poorly, with “Get on the Good Foot” being split into two parts and some songs getting cut off before the band has finished playing. Although these edits don’t have too much of a negative effect on the album, they do ensure that the flow gets broken a few times throughout.



James Brown - The Godfather Goes to Africa  (flac 432mb)

01 Intro 2:05
02 The Payback 3:55
03 Soul Power 2:26
04 The Boss 1:58
05 Makin' It Easy 1:51
06 Doin' It To Death 5:27
07 Bewildered 5:00
08 Sex Machine 5:03
09 Interlude 0:45
10 The James Brown Theme Part 1 5:07
11 The James Brown Theme Part 2 0:20
12 Caught With A Bag-Gimme Some More 2:58
13 Get On The Good Foot Part 1 1:51
14 Get On The Good Foot Part 2 0:59
15 It's a Man's World Jam Part 1 5:03
16 It's a Man's World Jam Part 2 11:10
17 Money 3:10
18 Finale 10:26

James Brown - The Godfather Goes to Africa  (ogg 154mb)

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The earlier show celebrates Studio 54 (on its' closing night) and the mid-'80s showcelebrates 40 years of James Brown in Show Business.This show from New York, at this point for longtime fans and JB is the one *on* the one! An absolutely terrific performance with the new JB, if you will - riding high on the Yuppie-Club Circuit, with a new, scaled-down, "Disco Soul" approach, with a softer-edge on the vocals: much less emphasis on screams, moans, and other nonverbalisms. He's trimmed down and funky as he wanna be.
Opening number, "It's Too Funky In Here" and finale intro. version both cut on CD.

The Chastain Park show has been recycled nearly into oblivion but the show is good > typical of the period - no surprises - but even at age 52 the superstar's energy level is amazing. It includes one of the greatest "Georgia On My Mind"(s) you'll ever hear. I've always said that Brown's arrangement is just as good as Ray Charles'; it's a shame it got lost on a B-side. It can be said that the '80 show is more guitar-driven, whereas the '85 mix showcases the horns (meaning that St. Clair Pinckney and Maceo "Father Popcorn" Parker have arrived early for the party).



James Brown - Double Dynamite  (flac 505mb)

01 Gonna Have A Funky Good Time (Doing It To Death) 2:53
02 Get Up Offa That Thing 6:07
03 Body Heat 5:13
04 Sex Machine 6:37
05 Try Me 4:27
06 Papa's Got A Brand New Bag 2:32
07 Get On The Good Foot 4:09
08 Medley Man's World, Lost Someone, Man's World (Reprise) 14:59
09 I Got The Feeling 2:42
10 Cold Sweat 3:15
11 Please, Please, Please 2:52
12 Jam 4:59
13 Medley The Payback, It's To Funky In Here 4:15
14 Prisoner Of Love 4:46
15 I Got You (I Feel Good) 3:27
16 Georgia On My Mind 5:52

James Brown - Double Dynamite  (ogg 190mb)

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