Apr 24, 2013

RhoDeo 1316 Aetix


Hello, well Barcelona recieved a thorough trashing by a Bayen Munich's side tonight making clear who rules from now on.

Meanwhile Aetix continues with females in the lead, and today a band that got a head up by 'saint' Kurt Cobain which had their minimalistic approach to guitar-driven folk-rock in the spotlight again ten years after they folded. Our other woman today looks defintely post punk here and delivers her icy side after having had hit succes with her first popalbum....N'Joy

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The Raincoats were one of the most experimental bands that immediately followed the initial burst of punk rock in the late '70s. With their minimalistic approach to guitar-driven folk-rock, the band developed a distinctive, jagged sound. The Raincoats were also one of the first all-female post-punk band. The original line-up of the Raincoats was Gina Birch on bass, Ana Da Silva on guitar, Vicky Aspinall on second guitar/violin & Palmolive (Paloma Romero), who had just left the Slits, on drums. Palmolive left shortly after the release of their first album in 1979 and was replaced by Ingrid Weiss.

The band recorded Moving in 1984 and began work on solo projects shortly after the release of this album. Gina Birch and Vicky Aspinall formed Dorothy and Ana da Silva worked with choreographer Gaby Agis on a series of dance projects and formed Roseland with Charles Hayward. The band gained a small cult following in their native England and an even smaller audience in America; they broke up in 1984, having released three studio albums. Nearly ten years later, the band became a hip name in alternative rock, thanks to Kurt Cobain's mention of the group in the liner notes to a Nirvana album. Geffen picked up the rights to the Raincoats' catalog and reissued their albums (with liner notes by Kurt Cobain & Kim Gordon) in late 1993 and 1994. The band reunited and toured with Nirvana in the U.K. before heading out on their own tour of the U.S. in 1994. Two years later, the Raincoats released Looking in the Shadows.

Since 1996, The Raincoats have played some special events such as Robert Wyatt's Meltdown in 2001, at Chicks on Speed's 99 Cents album release in Berlin in December 2003. da Silva and Birch recently recorded a cover version of "Monk Chant" for a compilation album of The Monks songs called Silver Monk Time. They played at Ladyfest Leeds in April 2007 and the Nuits Sonores Festival in Lyon on 18 May 2007 on the Girl Monster stage with Chicks on Speed. On 28 March 2009 The Raincoats-Fairytales-A Work in Progress, directed by Gina Birch and produced by The Raincoats was screened at the BFI in London and the band performed at Donaufestival on the Girl Monster stage with Girl Monster Orchestra on 25 April. The band performed at Matt Groening's All Tomorrow's Parties festival in May 2010 in Minehead, England.

On 21 November 2010 The Raincoats performed a concert as part of the PopRally series at MoMA in New York City. The band have been invited by Jeff Mangum of Neutral Milk Hotel to perform their debut album live at the All Tomorrow's Parties festival that he will curate in March 2012 in Minehead, England.

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The Raincoats self titled debut album is a shining example of the ripe musical possibilities available in the aftermath of the late '70s punk explosion. A collection of oddball rhythms, slightly off key girl harmonies, a violin (instrumental mish-mashing was rare in the punk days) and one truly stellar and unique cover of the Kinks “Lola.” It's forward thinking experimental rock with a deceptively simple veneer that when stripped back reveals a pulsing heart of accessible avant-garde folk influenced punk rock. All performed by four women, at a time when an all girl band in the male dominated punk scene was a rarity. This isn't music to make the rock kids dance to, this is music made by rock kids who decided to embrace the freedom on offer and run with it for as long and as far as they could. Taking their influences and squeezing them together into a passionate new that screams of possibility. It's not about fashion, it's not about an attitude it's about creating, experimenting, having a laugh and trying to get as many people involved as possible.



The Raincoats - The Raincoats (flac 224mb)

01 Fairytale In The Supermarket 2:55
02 No Side To Fall In 1:46
03 Adventures Close To Home 1:52
04 Off Duty Trip 3:14
05 Black And White 2:28
06 Lola 4:01
07 The Void 3:51
08 Life On The Line 4:21
09 You're A Million 3:38
10 In Love 3:11
11 No Looking 3:16

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'Recorded live at The Kitchen For The Performing Arts, NYC on Sunday, December 12, 1982. Originally a cassette-only release in 1983.

Rough, loose-limbed, warm, and exciting, The Kitchen Tapes is everything you'd expect from the Raincoats on-stage. Bolstered by the heavy percussion of Richard Dudanski and Derek Goddard, this recording pulsates, while the band dances around the beat tossing in shards of guitar, vocals, and violin. The liner essay by Greil Marcus is excellent.

The Raincoats were one of those cult bands that seemingly had more impact on other musicians than on the public. The rap on this band was that they couldn’t quite play their instruments, but their lack of technical proficiency was always compensated for by an earnestness and creativity that more formal training may have undermined. With their off-kilter song structures, ever-present chiming violin, and innate pop sense, the Raincoats created a host of quite interesting material. The Kitchen Tapes was originally issued by formerly cassette-only label ROIR in 1983 and documents the development of The Raincoats into an effective live act, as it captures a legendary performance at New York’s The Kitchen For The Performing Arts in December of 1982



The Raincoats - Kitchen Tapes (flac 254mb)

01 No One's Little Girl 3:38
02 Balloonacy 4:19
03 Oh Oh La La La 3:17
04 Only Loved At Night 3:21
05 I Saw A Hill 3:13
06 Mouth Of A Story 3:14
07 The Body 3:32
08 Shouting Out Loud 3:19
09 Rainstorm 3:55
10 Dance Of Hopping Mad 5:00
11 Animal Rhapsody 3:55
12 Puberty Song 1:17
13 No Side To Fall In 1:21
14 Honey Mad Woman 3:05

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The daughter of '50s British pop singer Marty Wilde, Kim Wilde had several pop hits during the '80s. Initially, her synth-driven pop fit in with the new wave movement, but as the decade progressed, it became clear that her strength was mainstream pop.
 In 1980, Kim Wilde signed with producer Mickie Most's Rak Records, releasing her first single, "Kids in America," early in 1981. "Kids in America" climbed to number two on the British charts that spring, while her second single, "Chequered Love," made it into the Top Ten; her self-titled debut album performed as well as her singles. The following year, "Kids in America" became a Top 40 hit in America, while Select kept her in the British charts. However, Wilde wasn't able to keep her momentum going and it wasn't until late 1986 that she had another hit with a dance cover of the Supremes' "You Keep Me Hangin' On," which charted in the Top Ten on both sides of the Atlantic. Wilde never had another hit in America, yet she was back in the charts in the summer of 1987 with "Another Step (Closer to You)," a duet with Junior Giscombe. After the single's success, she began changing her image, becoming sexier. The approach didn't entirely pay off, though she had a handful of hit singles from her 1988 album, Close, including "You Came," "Never Trust a Stranger," and "Four Letter Word." Wilde continued to record in the '90s, scoring the occasional hit, either in the dance or adult contemporary field.

Kim Wilde's second album didn't score any hits on the level of the debut's "Kids in America," although the dramatic "Cambodia" was a sort of cult favorite in some circles. That said, it's a far better album than the patchy debut; the songs, again by brother Rikki Wilde with occasional collaborations by father Marty Wilde, don't have the bubblegum tinge that colored much of 1981's Kim Wilde. The arrangements are more synth-oriented, at times approaching the dark atmospherics of Japan or Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. The occasionally melodramatic lyrics cover topics like police brutality and paranoia -- unsurprisingly, new insights aren't much in evidence -- and even the love songs, like the delicate "View from a Bridge," aren't exactly happy. The overall vibe of this album is so chilly that the one basically upbeat song, "Can You Come Over," sounds really out of place, but overall, it works. Wilde sings with a clinical detachment here that suits her voice quite well; whenever Wilde tries to emote musically, the results sound forced and melodramatic, but her icy edge on this album is surprisingly appealing.



Kim Wilde - Select  (flac 426mb)

01 Ego 4:11
02 Words Fell Down 3:31
03 Action City 3:22
04 View From A Bridge 3:31
05 Just A Feeling 4:09
06 Chaos At The Airport 3:18
07 Take Me Tonight 3:53
08 Can You Come Over 3:35
09 Wendy Sadd 3:47
10 Cambodia + Reprise 7:15
  Bonus Tracks
11 Watching For Shapes 3:43
12 Cambodia (Single Version) 3:58
13 Child Come Away 4:06
14 Just Another Guy 3:20
15 Bitter Is Better 3:44

 Kim Wilde - Select (ogg 144mb)

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elsewhere re-rip

Raincoats - Moving (83 * 77mb)

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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dear Rho,

thanx for your countless tasteful contributions to the blogsphere.

I would like to ask you for a re-up of the mighty "Kitchen-Tapes".

Your dedicated follower

Maria Kron

Anonymous said...

Dear Rho,

I'm really enjoying your blogging - nice stories and great music.

Is there any change of a re-up the debutalbum of The Raincoats?

Regards,

AZ54

AJ said...

Hello Rho
I'm asking for a re-up of Select by Kim Wilde and...if you have it, Kim's debut album

best
AJ

AJ said...

Thanks for the re-up Rho. What's the chance of Kim's debut album popping up sometime?

AJ