Oct 8, 2019

RhoDeo 1940 Magic 6

Hello, seeing that there was still some doubt whether these invisble energies exist Eileen McKusick was talking about these last weeks, admittedly these seem to be personalised energy of the sort the Chinese had been talking about for milenia..ch‘i kung (life-enegy), a centuries-old system of coordinated body-posture and movement, breathing, and meditation used for the purposes of health, spirituality, and martial-arts training. With roots in Chinese medicine, philosophy, and martial arts, qigong is traditionally viewed by the Chinese and throughout Asia as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (pronounced approximately as "chi"), translated as "life energy". With roots in ancient Chinese culture dating back more than 4,000 years,[citation needed] a wide variety of qigong forms have developed within different segments of Chinese society: in traditional Chinese medicine for preventive and curative functions; in Confucianism to promote longevity and improve moral character, in Daoism and Buddhism as part of meditative practice; and in Chinese martial arts to enhance fighting abilities. Contemporary qigong blends diverse and sometimes disparate traditions, in particular the Daoist meditative practice of "internal alchemy" (Neidan), the ancient meditative practices of "circulating qi" (Xing) and "standing meditation" (Zhan zhuang), and the slow gymnastic breathing exercise of "guiding and pulling" (Dao yin). Traditionally, knowledge about qigong was passed from adept master to student in elite unbroken lineages, typically with secretive and esoteric traditions of training and oral transmission, and with an emphasis on meditative practice by scholars and gymnastic or dynamic practice by the working masses and these days the West facilitates more segmentation.


The Physiology of Tai Chi and QiGong, a great 16 min introduction to theIf you are inspired and wish to learn more please visit our website: http://IIQTC.org



 a great 16 min introduction to ch‘i kung, if you are inspired and wish to learn more please visit our website: http://IIQTC.org





In China, the way to vibrant health does not lead to the doctor's office; it is as close as the air we breathe. In Qigong: Traditional Chinese Exercises for Healing Body, Mind, and Spirit, you will learn ancient techniques for harnessing the massive power of qi — literally, the "vital breath" or energy of the universe. Thousands of years before the establishment of Western medicine, Chinese masters perfected a system of gentle movements and meditative postures that can channel qi into the body for detoxifying, energizing, and healing. Ken Cohen, preeminent qigong master in the West, presents authentic practices on qigong. Using easy-to-follow language and dozens of demonstrations, Cohen shares a complete four-part workout you can practice any time you have a few minutes and enough room to stand and stretch.  (79min). On a personal note, i'm a bit of a reiki master and when i did the first exercise of simply assuming the correct position, i was shocked after my hands heated up immediately, hmmm i should have known but i didn't ah yes live and learn....






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Today, the 6th and final part of the first Disc-world tale The Colour of Magic..... N-Joy

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Sir Terence David John Pratchett OBE (28 April 1948 – 12 March 2015) was an English author of fantasy novels, especially comical works. He is best known for his Discworld series of 41 novels.

Pratchett's first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971. The first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983, after which Pratchett wrote an average of two books a year. His 2011 Discworld novel Snuff became the third-fastest-selling hardback adult-readership novel since records began in the UK, selling 55,000 copies in the first three days. The final Discworld novel, The Shepherd's Crown, was published in August 2015, five months after his death.

Pratchett, with more than 85 million books sold worldwide in 37 languages, was the UK's best-selling author of the 1990s. He was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1998 and was knighted for services to literature in the 2009 New Year Honours. In 2001 he won the annual Carnegie Medal for The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, the first Discworld book marketed for children. He received the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2010.

In December 2007, Pratchett announced that he had been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. He later made a substantial public donation to the Alzheimer's Research Trust (now Alzheimer's Research UK), filmed a television programme chronicling his experiences with the condition for the BBC, and became a patron for Alzheimer's Research UK. Pratchett died on 12 March 2015, aged 66.


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Discworld is a comic fantasy book series written by the English author Terry Pratchett, set on the Discworld, a flat planet balanced on the backs of four elephants which in turn stand on the back of a giant turtle. The books frequently parody or take inspiration from J. R. R. Tolkien, Robert E. Howard, H. P. Lovecraft, Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare, as well as mythology, folklore and fairy tales, often using them for satirical parallels with cultural, political and scientific issues.

Forty-one Discworld novels have been published. The original British editions of the first 26 novels, up to Thief of Time (2001), had cover art by Josh Kirby. The American editions, published by Harper Collins, used their own cover art. Since Kirby's death in 2001, the covers have been designed by Paul Kidby. Companion publications include eleven short stories (some only loosely related to the Discworld), four popular science books, and a number of supplementary books and reference guides. The series has been adapted for graphic novels, theatre, computer and board games, and television.

Newly released Discworld books regularly topped The Sunday Times best-sellers list, making Pratchett the UK's best-selling author in the 1990s. Discworld novels have also won awards such as the Prometheus Award and the Carnegie Medal. In the BBC's Big Read, four Discworld novels were in the top 100, and a total of fourteen in the top 200. More than 80 million Discworld books have been sold in 37 languages

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The Discworld novels contain common themes and motifs that run through the series. Fantasy clich├ęs are parodied in many of the novels, as are various subgenres of fantasy, such as fairy tales (notably Witches Abroad), witch and vampire stories (Carpe Jugulum) and so on. Analogies of real-world issues, such as religion (Small Gods), fundamentalism and inner city tension (Thud), business and politics (Making Money), racial prejudice and exploitation (Snuff) are recurring themes, as are aspects of culture and entertainment, such as opera (Maskerade), rock music (Soul Music), cinema (Moving Pictures), and football (Unseen Academicals). Parodies of non-Discworld fiction also occur frequently, including Shakespeare, Beatrix Potter, and several movies. Major historical events, especially battles, are sometimes used as the basis for both trivial and key events in Discworld stories (Jingo, Pyramids), as are trends in science, technology, pop culture and modern art (Moving Pictures, Men at Arms, Thud). There are also humanist themes in many of the Discworld novels, and a focus on critical thinking skills in the Witches and Tiffany Aching series.

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Setting

The story takes place on the Discworld, a planet-sized flat disc carried through space on the backs of four gargantuan elephants – Berilia, Tubul, Great T'Phon and Jerakeen – who themselves stand on the shell of Great A'Tuin, a gigantic sea turtle. The surface of the disc contains oceans and continents, and with them, civilizations, cities, forests and mountains.

Synopsis The Colour of Magic

The story begins in Ankh-Morpork, the biggest city on the Discworld. The main character is an incompetent and cynical wizard named Rincewind, who is hired as a guide to the rich but naive Twoflower, an insurance clerk from the Agatean Empire who has come to visit Ankh-Morpork. Initially attempting to flee with his advance payment, Rincewind is captured by the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, who forces him to protect Twoflower, lest the tourist's death provoke the Agatean Emperor into invading Ankh-Morpork. After Twoflower is kidnapped by a gang of thieves and taken to the Broken Drum Pub, Rincewind stages a rescue alongside the Luggage, an indestructible, enchanted and sentient chest belonging to Twoflower. Before this, Twoflower convinces the Drum's barman to take out a fire insurance policy; the barman subsequently attempts to burn down the Drum to claim the money, but ends up causing a fire that destroys the whole of Ankh-Morpork. Rincewind and Twoflower escape in the chaos.

Rincewind and Twoflower travel towards the city of Quirm, unaware that their adventures on this journey are actually the subject of a boardgame played by the Gods of the Discworld. The pair are separated when they are attacked by a mountain troll summoned by Offler the Crocodile God. The ignorant Twoflower ends up being led to the Temple of Bel-Shamharoth, a being said to be the opposite of both good and evil, while Rincewind ends up imprisoned in a dryad-inhabited tree in the woods, where he watches the events in Bel Shamharoth's temple through a magical portal. The pair are reunited when Rincewind escapes into the temple through the portal, and they encounter Hrun the Barbarian, a parody of heroes in the Swords and Sorcery genre. The trio are attacked and nearly killed by Bel-Shamharoth, but escape when Rincewind accidentally blinds the creature with Twoflower's magical picture box. Hrun agrees to travel with and protect Twoflower and Rincewind in exchange for heroic pictures of him from the picture box.

The trio visit the Wyrmberg, an upside-down mountain which is home to dragon-riders who summon their dragons by imagining them, and are separated when the riders attack them. Rincewind escapes capture but is forced by Kring, Hrun's sentient magical sword, to attempt to rescue his friends. Twoflower is imprisoned within the Wyrmberg, and because of his fascination with dragons, is able to summon one greater than those of the Wyrmberg riders, who he names Ninereeds, allowing him to escape captivity and save Rincewind from being killed in a duel with one of the three heirs of the Wyrmburg. Twoflower, Rincewind and Ninereeds snatch Hrun, but as they attempt to escape into the skies, Twoflower passes out from the lack of oxygen, causing Ninereeds to disappear. Hrun is saved by Liessa, but Rincewind and Twoflower find themselves falling to their deaths. In desperation, Rincewind manages to use the Wyrmberg's power to temporarily summon a passenger jet from the real world, before he and Twoflower fall into the ocean.

The two of them are taken to the edge of the Discworld by the ocean currents and nearly carried over, but they are caught by the Circumfence, a huge net built by the nation of Krull to catch sea life and flotsam washed in from the rest of the Discworld. They are rescued by Tethis the sea troll, a being composed of water who had fallen off the edge of his own world and onto the Discworld, where he was subsequently enslaved by the Krullians. Rincewind and Twoflower are then taken by the Krullians to their capital, where they learn that the Krullians intend to discover the sex of Great A'Tuin by launching a space capsule over the edge of the Disc, and plan to sacrifice Rincewind and Twoflower to get the god Fate to smile on the voyage, Fate insisting on their sacrifice after they caused him to lose the earlier game. Rincewind and Twoflower attempt to escape, but end up stealing the capsule, which is launched with Twoflower inside, the tourist wishing to see the other worlds of the universe. Rincewind is unable to get into the capsule in time, and falls off the Disc alongside it, the Luggage following them soon after.

The story segues into the beginning of The Light Fantastic; the two books can therefore be seen as one two-volume novel.


Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 6 ( 69min mp3     36mb).


01-14 The Colour of Magic 6  69min



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previously

Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 1 ( 69min mp3     38mb).
Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 2 ( 69min mp3     38mb).
Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 3 ( 68min mp3     38mb).
Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 4 ( 69min mp3     38mb).
Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 5 ( 66min mp3     36mb).


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8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Last time we met you were Shoden - when did you progress to Shinpiden? Merely formal trivialities, I know. It's good to know you are still practicing.

Rho said...

Bad choice of words, formally but then i'm addressing people who know very little about Reiki and calling myself a bit of a master is just about making a point. I know my hands give energy and i really was stunned how quickly these heated up after opening myself up to receive chi. You have to reckon that i'm dealing here with guys that refuse to believe any of it, their thirst for knowledge is quelled by 'big science' fairytales... On a side note good to hear from you again'anon' i've missed you.

Anonymous said...

Ok, I'm the graduate in "Old Sciences" and I finally got it.

I mean here that I really genuinely thought that you were confused in a particular domain
by some beautiful discourse, filled with amazing scientific words that impress a lot
of people who have no idea what they mean or represent (a paradise for the crooks/bigots).
I guess some of them certainly sound like music to some ears and that you can combine
them in just a melodious way that it looks like the bestest partition ever written.

Well, my mistake.

I wish you all a good luck in your quest at being the masters of tomorrow's science.
And all this without the slightest effort at actually learning the "old" one, how it works
or even comprehending the basis of scientific methodology.
This is surely some hell of a challenge you guys are bravely accepting to hold.
What can I do if not applauding you all for this "bio-field, electric current-flow" induced courage.
In the end, as your headtitles are telling, everyone wins: It's better than science, it's magic!

PS: If you and your friends do not mind, we "old scientists" will continue our ridiculous work aside
until you have reached your goal. Just in case you miss a taxi and/or just in order to keep the laboratories
heated until you get in to replace us (but do you need laboratories? Please do tell us, we're in the dark.).

Anonymous said...

Of course, we’re all in the dark when it comes to science! Science is useful in a great many ways - some (e.g. pacemakers) better than others (e.g. nuclear missiles). Science has taken us to the Moon and our probes to Mars. Its discoveries have the power to alleviate suffering due to starvation, drought and disease yet its practitioners relentlessly follow the funding - and in a world without ‘magic’ we all know where that leads.

Science is, indeed, only a methodology - it offers elite papers to its peers & textbooks of theories and best guesses and now and again hits upon the reality of it all. A scientist is a practitioner of a methodology and often one with a narrow expertise in a certain branch of the sciences. Any scientist worth his/her salt would readily admit that what we know and can prove beyond a reasonable doubt to others, with our primitive physics, is but a drop in the ocean of all there is to know! We can aspire to knowledge but on a mundane and purely academic level, this very often lacks the vision and openness of mind required to make those connections that might serve to add to our library of understanding.

Scientific equations of all kinds are in a constant flux of change (isn’t that, after all, the only constant in the universe?) and there are a great number of things afoot in the universe which currently have no scientific explanation - as yet. Sometimes, the physics just don’t add up or we need to create a whole new set of equations in order to attempt to figure it all out.

On top of all that, scientists are merely human too, you know…

Over to you, Mr Magoo!

Anonymous said...

"Ignorance is Bio-Field Strength", Kevin Orwell.

Anonymous said...

A little food for thought might be found here :
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4654789/

Anonymous said...

Hello Anonymous.
You can throw me any article you like*, it certainly doesn't solve the core problem you guys are facing.
(* Even governments are not devoid of corruption, and intellectual one, if any. I mean it if this link is effectively associated with your official government - I didn't check it, it doesn't even matter.)

You guys are using a scientific jargon in a very curious way. All these words have now no definition attached. It is obviously a problem. One would wonder why you aren't using your own jargon to describe these things you're deeply ressenting.

What you're doing gives the feeling that you're chasing for some "scientific" recognition, and we're here to your core problem:
You're rejecting the very definition of science, and, paradoxically, you want to be recognized as one. (?????)

It simply won't work. Period.

Now, I fully comprehend why you have to denigrate scientists, and physicists in my case. If there are people to see immediately through the twaddle you're spouting, it is us. Logic prevails after all.
And I'm sorry to say, but I'll always warn people I know against these discourses.

That being said, please remember that it is not us, scientists, feverly looking for some recognition. And that we're not using some imported jargon from who-know-where.

To end with a positive note, know that you're welcome into our universities/laboratories to study what we're doing, and learn what all these scientific words mean.


Anonymous said...

You didn't check - it doesn't even matter? Then how can you possibly have an opinion on it at all?

I still don't fully understand your aversion to the existence of biofields. I would be interested in why you feel that they are not a natural phenomenon. Maybe you would care to state your case instead of simply dismissing the idea entirely.