Apr 19, 2017

RhoDeo 1716 Aetix

Hello, Real Madrid must have demanded a corrupt referee, like Barca had earlier in that crazy match with PSG ,so they could advance against serious opposition, this became most clear shortly before regular time when he didn't give a deserved second yellow to a Real player but seconds later gave one to a Bayern player on a whim. Still not enough, in extra time Ronaldo got to score 2 off side goals and that did it.. The UEFA is losing it, clearly the corruption that gripped FIFA has gotten hold of those fat cat UEFA officials that shamelessly accommodate the top spanish teams, heads must roll !


Today's artist performed under the stage name Snakefinger, was an English musician, singer and songwriter. A multi-instrumentalist, he was best known for his guitar and violin work and his collaborations with The Residents.. .....N'Joy

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Philip Lithman led a schizophrenic career, trying to make his way out of obscurity into the light of mainstream success, but then found a living as a valued sideman to the most obscure pop group of the '70s and '80s: the Residents. His dramatic, slanted runs up the fretboard have its antecedents in the British blues scene and art rock, most particularly Robert Fripp and Fred Frith (the latter also lending guitar to Residents recordings); his fingerwork earned him the nickname "Snakefinger." In the end, he died (suddenly, of a heart attack) while in limbo: not weird enough for the Residents, not normal enough for chart success or critical recognition.

Born in London, England, in 1949, Lithman was coming of age in the psychedelic scene, but picked up the more menacing vibe that was permeating the last two years of that decade. In 1971, a 22-year-old Lithman came to San Francisco and met up with a strange group of art terrorists that would become the Residents. He accompanied the group for their two live appearances, as well as raising hell on live radio, playing violin in a screeching, free jazz joke. People dug it, but Lithman returned to England the following year, playing on two albums in the band Chilli Willi and the Red Hot Peppers with his friend Martin Stone (two of the members, Nick Lowe and Pete Thomas, would go on to fame working with Elvis Costello). When the group disbanded, Lithman returned to America, and settled in Los Angeles, where he shopped around demos for two years, trying to break into the mainstream rock scene in the style of the Eagles, Jackson Browne, and other soft rock standbys. Both Warner Bros. and RCA rejected him. In 1978, he returned to San Francisco and in the middle of shopping around another demo, reunited with his old friends, the Residents. The college-age pranksters had grown into a bizarre band with a cult following and their own label and now had a desire to add other artists to their label's roster -- Snakefinger had returned.

For two years, the Residents co-wrote and produced two Snakefinger albums (Chewing Hides the Sound and Greener Postures), a single "The Spot," and featured him on their albums Duck Stab and The Commercial Album. He also seared the ears with his unforgettable solo on their cover of "Satisfaction" -- it needs to be heard to be believed. The solo albums, while a critical success (Chewing received a "classic" rating in the 1983 Rolling Stone Record Guide), seemed more about the Residents than Snakefinger: the similar demented pop of Duck Stab, the singsong lyrics, the weird and cool imagery. Given a chance, Lithman's Brit Rock purisms would leak out; in 1983 he toured, playing blues covers. In the early '80s, while the Residents were engulfed in touring, he formed a band, the Vestal Virgins, with members of Pere Ubu and assorted Bay Area groups, and recorded a third album, Manual of Errors. Here was a breakthrough -- with only a few songs co-written with the Residents, Lithman could make it as a true solo artist. In 1985-1986, Lithman returned to play a world tour with the Residents, documented on at least three releases as the 13th Anniversary Tour. This is a terrific example of Snakefinger's work -- delicate slide work, menacing, distortion filled guitar (often in the same song). That year also saw the release of his most mature work to date: Night of Desireable Objects, recorded with the Vestal Virgins. The eclectic album represented the varying influences at work in Lithman's career, from Nino Rota and Miles Davis to folk and art pop. The Virgins hit the road for a support tour. On July 1, 1987, after a concert in Linz, Austria, Lithman suffered a fatal heart attack, on the day of his death, his single, "There's No Justice in Life", was released. The Residents, who were scheduled to use Lithman on their upcoming God in Three Persons album, composed music for his funeral (later released on Snakey Wake). Since 1987, the Residents have kept Lithman's memory alive through re-releases of his Ralph Records material, including a B-sides collection.

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English avant-guitarist Philip Charles Lithman, aka Snakefinger, began an association with the Residents in 1969, before the group even had that name. The Residents co-produced his two albums with Snakefinger. Chewing Hides Sound from 1979 includes a cover of Kraftwerk's "The Model." This is very appropriate because both groups relied heavily on mechanical, angular rhythms and lyrics loaded with more visual metaphor than meaning, like "Jesus Was a Leprechaun." This is the peculiar and unique material of a cult guitarist extraordinaire. Each song is a quirky island in a sea of sonic oddity. "Here Comes the Bums" is hip and cool while "Who Is the Culprit and Who Is the Victim?" is tense and neurotic. A listen to this album forces consideration of his immense contribution to the Residents' sound.



Snakefinger - Chewing Hides The Sound   (flac  220mb)
 
01 The Model 3:41
02 Kill The Great Raven 3:05
03 Jesus Was A Leprechaun 2:00
04 Here Comes The Bums 2:50
05 The Vivian Girls 2:08
06 Magic And Ecstasy 2:49
07 Who Is The Culprit And Who Is The Victim? 2:58
08 What Wilbur? 2:35
09 Picnic In The Jungle 3:57
10 The Spot 3:00
11 I Love Mary 2:31
12 The Vultures Of Bombay 3:03

Snakefinger - Chewing Hides The Sound   (ogg  85mb)

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English avant-guitarist Philip Charles Lithman, aka Snakefinger, began an association with the Residents in 1969, before the group even had that name. The Residents co-produced his two albums with Snakefinger. Greener Postures was originally released in 1980. This is the peculiar and unique material of a cult guitarist extraordinaire. Each song is a quirky island in a sea of sonic oddity. The gamut on Greener Postures runs from the edgy depression ballad "Living in Vain" to "I Come From an Island" with an oppressive beat and stark message that could come from the Residents' The Mole Show. A listen to this album forces consideration of his immense contribution to the Residents' sound.



Snakefinger - Greener Postures   (flac  238mb)

01 Golden Goat 4:08
02 Don't Lie 3:31
03 The Man In The Dark Sedan 4:33
04 I Come From An Island 3:22
05 Jungle Princess 3:46
06 Trrashing All The Loves Of History 3:09
07 Save Me From Dali 2:31
08 Living In Vain 3:41
09 The Picture Makers Vs. Children Of The Sea 9:29

Snakefinger - Greener Postures   (ogg  95mb)

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In 1982 Lithman formed his backing band The Vestal Virgins with former Captain Beefheart sideman Eric Drew Feldman and with members of Pere Ubu and assorted Bay Area groups, and recorded a third album, Manual of Errors. It was a breakthrough -- with only a few songs co-written with the Residents, Lithman could make it as a true solo artist.



Snakefinger - Manual Of Errors (flac 301mb)

01 Yeti: What Are You? 4:10
02 Beatnik Party 3:42
03 The Garden Of Earthly Delights 3:02
04 You Sliced Up My Wife 2:01
05 I Followed George's Dream 5:24
06 Bring Back Reality 5:07
07 Shining Faces ("I Am Nino") 2:22
08 Eva's Warning 4:37
09 Private Universe / The Life On Nebulov 7:35
Bonus
10 I Love You Too Much To Respect You 3:37
11 The Vivian Girls 2:09
12 Talking In The Town 2:36
13 Womb To Worm 3:17
14 The Jungle Princess 3:47

Snakefinger - Manual Of Errors   (ogg  128mb)

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The final Snakefinger LP released during the guitarist's lifetime is a typically bent, eclectic affair. Recorded with his band the Vestal Virgins (led by Captain Beefheart alum Eric Drew Feldman), Night of Desirable Objects features ornate jazz instrumentals, an English fiddle ballad, and a bit of a cappella gospel.



Snakefinger's Vestal Virgins - Night of Desirable Objects (flac  278mb)

01 Sophia's Playful Pipes 1:48
02 There's No Justice In Life 3:17
03 Bless Me For I Have Sinned 2:34
04 Jesus Gave Me Water 1:05
05 Move 2:28
06 The Golden King 7:52
07 Bad Day In Bombay (Parts I & II) 6:03
08 8¼ 4:15
09 I Gave Myself To You 4:41
10 Sawney Bean-Sawney's Death Dance  4:33
11 It Hurts Me Too 3:59
12 I Love You Too Much To Respect You 3:51
13 This Is Not A Disco Song 3:47

Snakefinger's Vestal Virgins - Night of Desirable Objects   (ogg  114mb)

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Philip Charles Lithman AKA Snakefinger was a posthumous collection released by The Residents' fan club organization, Uncle Willie's Eyeball Buddies, or UWEB. It features unreleased tracks spanning Snakefinger's career from 1971 to 1987. The first, second, and last tracks are live performances of songs which were intended to be recorded on the next album ("We hope," Snakey quips to the audience). "Death Collage" is a track assembled by The Residents in tribute to their departed friend. To round out the compilation, some obscure b-sides are included as well as unreleased demos from the mid-1970's.
This album demonstrates the rather schizophrenic career of a talented guitarist who was finally coming out from the shadow of his more famous friends when felled by a heart attack. In reverse chronological order, you hear a man melding British art rock concerns (Robert Fripp-esque approaches to scales and song structure) with Left Coast, Bay Area weirdness, with varying degrees of emphasis and success. Listeners who equate Lithman as the fifth Resident with a human face will be surprised to hear a straightforward Elmore James cover ("It Hurts Me, Too"), a stab at 10CC-style romanticism ("Hidden Treasure"), and mellow rock ("MaryAnn"). The Residents sum up his tenure with them with an eight-minute sound collage, and there's even a track from his stint with Chilli Willi and the Red Hot Peppers, sounding for all the world like the Doobie Brothers. For some, this proves that the man wasn't as weird as he? -- or the Residents? -- hoped he would be; for others it shows that the Residents gave him the creative freedom to think beyond a commercial recording career and was in the process of carving out his own niche. Fascinating, rare, but not entirely essential.



 Snakefinger - Philip Charles Lithman AKA Snakefinger (49-87)   (flac 320mb)

01 You're A Can Of Gasoline (I'm A Lighted Match) 2:38
02 Artists In Bed 3:50
03 This Is Not A Disco Song 3:47
04 Cry For The Fire (Excerpt) 2:34
05 It Hurts Me, Too 4:01
06 Hidden Treasure 3:50
07 What Wilbur? 3:06
08 Death Collage 8:12
09 Mary Ann 3:57
10 Wanderers Return 2:42
11 Hollywood Blues 3:19
12 Desert Island Woman 2:01
13 Cantaten To Der Dying Prunen (Excerpt) 2:30
14 There's No Justice In Life 4:34
15 Climbing The Ladder 6:02

Snakefinger - Philip Charles Lithman AKA Snakefinger (49-87)   (ogg  127mb)

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4 comments:

VanceMan said...

Thanks for revisiting Snakefinger. I was lucky enough to see him in concert many years ago and he was just a terrific live player.

Cass said...

Thanks for the intro to this artist, Rho.

Sammaelonoir said...

infinitas gracias!!! estuve muchisimo tiempo buscando este material y era imposible. saludos!

Rho said...

Hello Sammaelonoir well what can I say, "Search and Ye shall find "