Mar 1, 2016

RhoDeo 1609 Roots

Hello, as we learned yesterday Hollywood priced the fact fiction of Spotlight more than the fact fiction of the Revenant which clearly is more of a Trump movie, Spotlight is more of a Rodham-Clinton movie. Coincidence ? No. After months of noise tomorrow there's super tuesday and to the dismay of the Republican leadership Trump is likely to win their candidacy, they just couldn't do what John Oliver did in 20 minutes sundaynight. He made mincemeat of him and to top it all up came up with Trumps original family name..DRUMPH yes from now on it's Donald Drumpf for president  You can change a name but not ones genetics..


Today,again. a Brazilian songwriter, composer, arranger, singer, and pianist/guitarist. He was a primary force behind the creation of the bossa nova style, and his songs have been performed by many singers and instrumentalists within Brazil and internationally. Widely known as the composer of "Garota de Ipanema" ("The Girl from Ipanema"), one of the most recorded songs of all time, Jobim has left a large number of songs that are now included in jazz and pop standard repertoires. The song "Garota de Ipanema" has been recorded over 240 times by other artists.....N'Joy

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Antônio Carlos Jobim was born in the middle-class district of Tijuca in Rio de Janeiro. His father Jorge de Oliveira Jobim (São Gabriel, Rio Grande do Sul, April 23, 1889 – July 19, 1935) was a writer, diplomat, professor and journalist. When Antônio was still an infant, his parents separated and his mother, Nilza Brasileiro de Almeida, moved with her children (Antônio Carlos and his sister Helena Isaura) to Ipanema, the beachside neighborhood the composer would later celebrate in his songs. In 1935, when the elder Jobim died, Nilza married Celso da Frota Pessoa, who would encourage his stepson's career. He was the one who gave Jobim his first piano. As a young man of limited means, Jobim earned his living by playing in nightclubs and bars and later as an arranger for a recording label, before starting to achieve success as a composer.

Jobim's musical roots were planted firmly in the work of Pixinguinha, the legendary musician and composer who began modern Brazilian music in the 1930s. Among his teachers were Lúcia Branco, and, from 1941 on, Hans-Joachim Koellreutter. Jobim was also influenced by the French composers Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, by the Brazilian composers Heitor Villa-Lobos, Ary Barroso, and by jazz. Among many themes, his lyrics talked about love, self-discovery, betrayal, joy and especially about the birds and natural wonders of Brazil, like the "Mata Atlântica" forest, characters of Brazilian folklore, and his home city of Rio de Janeiro

Jobim became prominent in Brazil when he teamed up with poet and diplomat Vinícius de Moraes to write the music for the play Orfeu da Conceição (1956). The most popular song from the show was "Se Todos Fossem Iguais A Você" ("If Everyone Were Like You"). Later, when the play was turned into a film, producer Sacha Gordine did not want to use any of the existing music from the play. Gordine asked de Moraes and Jobim for a new score for the film Black Orpheus (1959).This collaboration proved successful, and Vinicius went on to pen the lyrics to some of Jobim's most popular songs.

A key event in making Jobim's music known in the English speaking world was his collaboration with the American jazz saxophonist Stan Getz, João Gilberto and Gilberto's wife at the time, Astrud Gilberto, which resulted in two albums, Getz/Gilberto (1963) and Getz/Gilberto Vol. 2 (1964). The release of Getz/Gilberto created a bossa nova craze in the United States, and subsequently internationally. Jobim wrote many of the songs on Getz/Gilberto, which became one of the best-selling jazz albums of all time, and turned Astrud Gilberto, who sang on "The Girl from Ipanema" and "Corcovado", into an international sensation. At the Grammy Awards of 1965 Getz/Gilberto won the Grammy Award for Album of the Year, Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album, Individual or Group and the Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical. "The Girl from Ipanema" won the Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

Jobim was married to Thereza Otero Hermanny on October 15, 1949 and had two children with her: Paulo Jobim (born 1950), an architect and musician, married and father of Daniel Jobim (born 1973) and Dora Jobim (born 1976); and Elizabeth "Beth" Jobim (born 1957), a painter. Jobim and Thereza divorced in 1978. On April 30, 1986 he married 29-year-old photographer Ana Beatriz Lontra, with whom he had two more children: João Francisco Jobim (1979–1998) and Maria Luiza Helena Jobim (born 1987). Daniel, Paulo's son, Tom's grandson; followed his grandfather to become a pianist and composer.

In early 1994, after finishing his album Antonio Brasileiro, Jobim complained to his doctor, Roberto Hugo Costa Lima, of urinary problems. A bladder tumor was detected, but Jobim postponed the recommended immediate surgery for several months, while he tried spiritual treatment with a Brazilian medium and started working on his album Tom Jobim. His operation took place at Mount Sinai Hospital, in New York, on December 2, 1994. On December 8, while recovering from surgery, he had a cardiac arrest caused by a pulmonary embolism and two hours later another cardiac arrest, from which he died. His last album, Antonio Brasileiro, was released posthumously three days after his death.

Jobim is widely regarded as one of the most important songwriters of the 20th century. Many of Jobim's songs are jazz standards. American jazz singers Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra prominently featured Jobim's songs on their albums Jobim was an innovator in the use of sophisticated harmonic structures in popular song. Some of his melodic twists, like the melody insisting on the major seventh of the chord, became common use in jazz after him. The Brazilian collaborators and interpreters of Jobim's music include Vinícius de Moraes, João Gilberto (often credited as a co-creator of bossa nova), Chico Buarque, Gal Costa, Elis Regina, Sérgio Mendes, Astrud Gilberto, and Flora Purim. Eumir Deodato and the conductor/composer Claus Ogerman arranged many recordings of Jobim tunes. He won a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 54th Grammy Awards in 2012. As a posthumous homage, on January 5, 1999, the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro changed the name of Rio's Galeão International Airport, located on Governador Island, to bear the composer's name. Galeão Airport is explicitly mentioned in his composition "Samba do Avião". In 2014, Jobim was posthumously inducted to the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 2015, Billboard named Jobim as one of The 30 Most Influential Latin Artists of All Time.


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By 1967, bossa nova had become quite popular within jazz and traditional pop audiences, yet Frank Sinatra hadn't attempted any Brazil-influenced material. Sinatra decided to record a full-fledged bossa nova album with the genre's leading composer, Antonio Carlos Jobim. Arranged by Claus Ogerman and featuring Jobim on guitar and backing vocals, Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim concentrated on Jobim's originals, adding three American classics -- "Baubles, Bangles and Beads," "Change Partners," and "I Concentrate on You" -- that were rearranged to suit bossa nova conventions. The result was a subdued, quiet album that used the Latin rhythms as a foundation, not as a focal point. Supported by a relaxed, sympathetic arrangement of muted brass, simmering percussion, soft strings, and Jobim's lilting guitar, Sinatra turns in an especially noteworthy performance; he has never sounded so subtle, underplaying every line he delivers and showcasing vocal techniques that he never had displayed before. Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim doesn't reveal its pleasures immediately; the album is too textured and understated to be fully appreciated within one listen. After a few plays, the album begins to slowly work its way underneath a listener's skin, and it emerges as one of his most rewarding albums of the '60s.



Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim - Id (flac 154mb)

01 The Girl From Ipanema (Gârota De Ipanema) 3:16
02 Dindi 3:30
03 Change Partners 2:43
04 Quiet Nights Of Quiet Stars (Corcovado) 2:45
05 Meditation (Meditacào) 2:56
06 If You Never Come To Me 2:12
07 How Insensitive (Insensatez) 3:18
08 I Concentrate On You 2:40
09 Baubles, Bangles And Beads 2:35
10 Once I Loved (O Amor En Paz) 2:36

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This album has had a somewhat confusing release history, appearing as it did amid a flurry of activity by Jobim (including his work with Frank Sinatra) and bouncing between several labels since its first release in 1967. Made up of instrumentals as well as songs (all of the latter in English), it was a superb showcase for the melodic aspect of Jobim's art, though the material, like so much of Jobim's work during his explosive first decade of international recognition, represented something of a work in progress, a fact borne out by the subsequent reworking of the stunning closing number, "Zingaro," as "Retrato Em Branco E Preto." Claus Ogerman's musical direction offers a mix of influences, ranging from Dom um Romão's drumming to the presence of the first violinist of the New York Philharmonic, all combining to sympathetic effect. The post-2000 CD remasterings also offer superb sound and excellent annotation.



Antonio Carlos Jobim - A Certain Mr. Jobim  (flac  155mb)

01 Bonita 2:55
02 Se Todos Fossem Iguais A Voce 2:16
03 Off Key (Desafinado) 3:05
04 Photography 2:09
05 Surfboard 2:44
06 Once Again (Outra Vez) 2:06
07 I Was Just One More For You (Esperanca Perdida) 2:23
08 Estrada Do Sol 3:28
09 Don't Ever Go Away (Por Causa De Voce) 2:45
10 Zingaro 2:16

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On Jobim's second A&M album, Eumir Deodato takes over the chart-making tasks, and the difference between him and Claus Ogerman is quite apparent in the remake of "The Girl From Ipanema": the charts are heavier, more dramatic, and structured. Sometimes the arrangements roll back so one can hear, say, the dancing multi-phonic flute of wildman Hermeto Pascoal on "Tema Jazz," and the rhythms often veer away from the familiar ticking of the bossa nova. Jobim is his usual understated self, adding very subtle electric piano to his arsenal of acoustic piano and guitar, but the material sometimes falls short of Jobim's tip-top level (dead giveaway: "Tide" is a clever rewrite on the chord changes of "Wave"). Still, it's beautifully made and very musical at all times.



Antonio Carlos Jobim - Tide (flac 318mb)

01 Girl From Ipanema 4:50
02 Carinhoso 2:47
03 Tema Jazz 4:35
04 Sue Ann 3:03
05 Remember 4:00
06 Tide 4:03
07 Takatanga 4:42
08 Caribe 2:42
09 Rockanalia 4:45
10 Tema Jazz (Alternate Take) 2:49
11 Tide (Alternate Take) 4:00
12 Tema Jazz (Alternate Take) 5:43
13 Tema Jazz (Master Take In Full) 8:11

Antonio Carlos Jobim - Tide  (ogg   118mb)

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Recorded in 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder's studio in New Jersey under the production auspices of Creed Taylor, the arrangement and conducting skills of Deodato, and the engineering expertise of Van Gelder himself, Jobim's Stone Flower is quite simply one of his most quietly stunning works -- and certainly the high point of his time at Columbia. Nearly a decade after the paint peeled from the shine of bossa nova's domination of both the pop and jazz charts in the early '60s, Creed Taylor brought Jobim's tender hush of the bossa sound back into the limelight. With a band that included both Jobim and Deodato on guitars (Jobim also plays piano and sings in a couple of spots), Ron Carter on bass, João Palma on drums, Airto Moreira and Everaldo Ferreira on percussion, Urbie Green on trombone, Joe Farrell on soprano saxophone, and Harry Lookofsky laying down a soulful violin solo on the title track, Jobim created his own version of Kind of Blue. The set opens with the low, simmering "Tereza My Love," with its hushed, elongated trombone lines and shifting acoustic guitars floating on the evening breeze. It begins intimate and ends with a closeness that is almost uncomfortably sensual, even for bossa nova. And then there are the slippery piano melodies Jobim lets roll off his fingers against a backdrop of gauzy strings and syncopated rhythms in both "Choro" and "Brazil." The latter is a samba tune with a sprightly tempo brought to the fore by Jobim's sandy, smoky vocal hovering ghost-like about the instrumental shimmer in the mix. Take, for instance, the title track with its stuttered, near imperceptible percussion laid under a Jobim piano melody of such simplicity, it's harmonically deceptive. It isn't until Lookofsky enters for his solo that you realize just how sophisticated and dense both rhythm and the chromatic lyricism are. The album closes with a reprise of "Brazil," restating a theme that has, surprisingly been touched upon in every track since the original inception, making most of the disc a suite that is a lush, sense-altering mediation, not only on Jobim's music and the portraits it paints, but ON the sounds employed by Taylor to achieve this effect. Stone Flower is simply brilliant, a velvety, late-night snapshot of Jobim at his peak.



Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (flac 220mb)

01 Tereza My Love 4:22
02 Children's Games 3:29
03 Choro 2:08
04 Brazil 7:24
05 Stone Flower 3:19
06 Amparo 3:39
07 Andorinha 3:29
08 God And The Devil In The Land Of Sun 2:21
09 Sabia 3:57
10 Brazil (Alternate Take) 5:25

Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower  (ogg   97mb)

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1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Could you please reup A Certain MR Jobim? Maybe also Stone Flower? Thank you.