May 24, 2015

Sundaze 1521

Hello, yes it was Eurovision songcontest night and the trofee wasn't won by Russia that led halfway that would be a great snub from the people to the politicians that wage economic war against Russia. The price went to Sweden, good total package Heroes was not just a song it had a great lightshow too , there were many great lightshows. For a long time it was a fairley close 3 horse race with Italy in the mix. Excellent fouth was Belgium with Loïc Nottet - Rhythm Inside, a selfpenned song by the 19 year old scored several 12 pointers, he's got a great career ahead of him. On the losing end were the big European three Germany, France and England that scored 9 points-together....Monaco Grandprix this weekend and Hamilton won the qualification before Rosberg and Vettel could well be the result tomorrow but its Monaco and accidents will happen...


Today a Canadian electronic music project, headed by Rhys Fulber, profing that there's more besides ,Front Line Assembly and Delerium   .... N'joy

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Conjure One is a Canadian electronic music project, headed by Rhys Fulber, better known as a member of Front Line Assembly and Delerium.Fulber left Front Line Assembly in early 1997, in pursuit of a solo career. Soon after, a debut album was announced, though Fulber's work as a producer and remixer eventually pushed its release to September 2002.

The self-titled album was a fusion of the electronic characteristics of Fulber's previous work -- keyboard-based, with rhythmic dance beats—and the influences of Middle Eastern music, which inspired ambient melodies more reminiscent of Delerium. A number of songs were more pop-oriented and featured guest vocalists, primarily Poe and Chemda, the latter singing entirely in Arabic. Sinéad O'Connor and Jeff Martin of The Tea Party were also featured.

After returning to Front Line Assembly and Delerium, in 2005 Fulber released a second album entitled Extraordinary Ways. This album utilized much more contemporary sounds, including much greater prominence given to guitars and trip hop-like beats. Vocalists included Tiff Lacey, Poe (credited as "Jane"), Chemda, Joanna Stevens, and even Fulber himself (covering a song by the punk band Buzzcocks).

In 2007, Germany's biggest selling female pop star of the 80s Sandra Cretu covered "Sleep" as a bonus track on her single "The Way I Am". Fulber left Front Line Assembly in early 1997, in pursuit of a solo career. Soon after, a debut album was announced, though Fulber's work as a producer and remixer eventually pushed its release to September 2002.

The self-titled album was a fusion of the electronic characteristics of Fulber's previous work -- keyboard-based, with rhythmic dance beats—and the influences of Middle Eastern music, which inspired ambient melodies more reminiscent of Delerium. A number of songs were more pop-oriented and featured guest vocalists, primarily Poe and Chemda, the latter singing entirely in Arabic. Sinéad O'Connor and Jeff Martin of The Tea Party were also featured.

After returning to Front Line Assembly and Delerium, in 2005 Fulber released a second album entitled Extraordinary Ways. This album utilized much more contemporary sounds, including much greater prominence given to guitars and trip hop-like beats. Vocalists included Tiff Lacey, Poe (credited as "Jane"), Chemda, Joanna Stevens, and even Fulber himself (covering a song by the punk band Buzzcocks).

Exilarch is the latest studio album released under his alias Conjure One, after five years since the previous effort. The album was initially released as a worldwide digital download on October 19, 2010, while the physical release was made available in the US on November 9, 2010.  There's a new album in the pipeline , Holoscenic, to be released this year.

The album Reasons to Disturb is attributed to Conjure One, but Fulber has denied involvement in its production. Although it contains a few newer Conjure One songs and remixes, the songs are actually renamed versions of songs by Poe, Balligomingo, and Fauxliage, among others.

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Rhys Fulber had already proven his skills in ambient dance with Delerium. On Conjure One, he develops his own ideas further, applying a wonderful grasp of sounds from the Mediterranean and Middle East. Fulber traveled the world to put together this breathtaking work, which was recorded in Amsterdam, Vancouver, London, and Los Angeles. Given his busy production schedule, it's no surprise that this took three years to finish. The result is satisfying to say the least, as Conjure One is nothing short of sweeping ambient dance-pop. Like Sarah McLachlan's contribution to Delerium's "Silence," the guest vocalists here enhance Fulber's already powerful songwriting. Most magnificent are Sinéad O'Connor ("Tears From the Moon"), Poe ("Center of the Sun"), and Marie Claire D'Ubaldo ("Manic Star"). With other collaborations from Billy Steinberg and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, this ethereal solo debut (if you can call it a solo effort) is another big step forward for Fulber, as well as culturally diverse pop. A limited-edition version comes with a second disc of remixes.



Conjure One  ‎–  Conjure One (flac 369mb)

01 Damascus 2:02
02 Center Of The Sun 5:00
03 Tears From The Moon 4:17
04 Tidal Pool 6:50
05 Manic Star 5:23
06 Redemption 6:59
07 Years 6:21
08 Make A Wish 4:32
09 Pandora 5:02
10 Sleep 5:00  besides
11 Premonition (Reprise) 3:15

Conjure One  ‎–  Conjure One (ogg  128mb)

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Conjure One  ‎–  Bonus Disc (flac 396mb)

01 Tears From The Moon (Hybrid's Twisted On The Terrace Mix) 9:51
02 Redemption (Max Graham's Dead Sea Mix) 11:14
03 Sleep (Ian Van Dahl Mix) 8:06
04 Center Of The Sun (Junkie XL Remix) 9:40
05 Tears From The Moon (DJ Tiësto's In Search Of Sunrise Remix) 8:13
06 Sleep (Solar Stone's "Afterhours" Mix) 6:52
07 Center Of The Sun (Solarstone's Chilled Out Remix) 9:58

Conjure One  ‎–  Bonus Disc (ogg 150mb)

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Three years after an impressive debut, Rhys Fulber shows his solo project wasn't a one-shot deal nor a lucky stab at reinvention. Extraordinary Ways is similar to Conjure One, in that it's lush and majestic ambient pop. The difference this time around is more in the recording process and Fulber's inspirations. With Conjure One, Fulber traveled the world to record while applying Middle Eastern influences. For Extraordinary Ways, he wrote songs only in Los Angeles and tones down the global ambitions. He again assembles a roster of powerful vocalists with whom he can't go wrong: Jane, Chemda, Tiff Lacey, and Joanna Stevens. Fulber even contributes vocals himself, on an unexpected cover of the Buzzcocks' "I Believe." It's a little out of place, but still interesting. Toward the end, the impact drops down a notch, and one wishes the vocalists had some better melodies with which to work. Nonetheless, this is an engaging and spiritual listen.



Conjure One - Extraordinary Ways  (flac 449mb)

01 Endless Dream 4:30
02 Face The Music 4:35
03 Pilgrimage 6:48
04 One Word 4:40
05 I Believe 6:07
06 Beyond Being 7:07
07 Extraordinary Way 4:40
08 Dying Light 6:45
09 Forever Lost 4:46
10 Into The Escape 4:15
bonus
11 Extraordinary Way (Antillas Mix) 7:46
12 Extraordinary Way (Low End Specialists mix) 9:05

Conjure One - Extraordinary Ways  (ogg 148mb)

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For five years, Conjure One has sat quietly. The writing and recording process neither hurried nor urgent. Now, they have returned with the exquisite album Exilarch. Ten stand out tracks selected and put together for the listener's delight. After the last album Extraordinary Ways, there were many fans who were quite skeptical that this album wouldn't turn into another overly commercial release as well. Fortunately, it would appear that the fears were unfounded and this is the album that should have been made five years ago.

Exilarch, with its title referring to the Jewish leaders of the Babylonian Exile, is a nomadic album that travels between light and dark, meticulously incorporating electronic beats, lush textures and haunting vocals. By fusing organic instrumentations of the ancient east with synthetic electronics of the modern west, it presents a strong example of Conjure One's signature style.

From the opening track Like Ice, which features the stunning vocals of Jaren Cerf (who has worked with the likes of Dash Berlin, Serge Devant and Armin Van Buuren). It is plainly obvious that this is going to be an amazing album. The album moves back towards the bands roots of heavy synth with a mixture of gothic and middle eastern influence. Following is the second track Places Like That Don't Exist. A instrumental track that seems almost of throw back from producer Rhys Fulber's days in Delerium and Front Line Assembly. The track is masterfully put together. The constant reminder of electronica with the softer melody over the top. It is quite a difficult piece to describe but certainly well worth the time to listen to. On the track Zephyr, Jaren Cerf returns providing her remarkable amount of talent to the song. As the majestic strains of music meet with Cerf's voice, the entire album lights up brightly and sounds out beautifully. It's dark and light all at once with an uplifting sensation. A track that has to be heard to be believed.


Nargis reminds the listener of the middle eastern influences that Conjure One is well known for. Add to that the beautiful singing voice of Azam Ali and it's a stand out track. The feel of the traditional music of the East meeting the electronic movement of the West and combining in a stunning way to leave the listener enthralled. Going forwards is the third collaboration with Jaren Cerf on the album highlight The Distance. If you buy this album for no other reason, it should be for this song alone. The song is light and airy. It's almost ethereal in it's beauty and simplicity. The track is stunning. There is no other way to describe it. The album as a whole is a stand out but this track... it is THE highlight of the album. Popping up on the emotive track is Leah Randi who has previously worked with Delerium and Front Line Assembly. The track is I Dream in Colour and it's breath taking. When coupled with the following track Existential Exile, also featuring Randi, the effect is nothing short of amazing. It's a tribute to the fact that Conjure One has now found it's own path and is no longer following down the path the Fulber previously walked with Delerium. Closing the album is the last instrumental track Oligarch which is breathtaking in it's own right. It's got the sweeping strings, electronic beats and, again, middle eastern influence. The track is a phenomenon. It's honestly a shame that there are nine other tracks to get through before reaching this one.

For those who have thought that Conjure One was an attempt to cash in on his previous fame with Front Line Assembly and Delerium, this album has certainly proven them wrong. This album has the mood of Semantic Spaces, the electronics of Civilization and the darkness of Karma. Exilarch is not a poor man's Delerium. This is Conjure One, standing proudly on it's own next to Fulber's previous works.



Conjure One - Exilarch  (flac  449mb)

01 Like Ice 6:04
02 Places That Don't Exist 6:02
03 Zephyr 4:58
04 Nargis 5:59
05 Nomadic Code 8:50
06 The Distance 3:55
07 I Dream In Colour 6:33
08 Existential Exile 5:51
09 Run For Cover 6:25
10 Oligarch 5:10

Conjure One - Exilarch  (ogg 138mb)

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1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Wonderful!

Have you followed Azam Ali's career, and the band Vas? You'll love them!