Apr 30, 2019

RhoDeo 1917 Kafka 2

Hello,


The Castle is often understood to be about alienation, unresponsive bureaucracy, the frustration of trying to conduct business with non-transparent, seemingly arbitrary controlling systems, and the futile pursuit of an unobtainable goal.

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Franz Kafka[a] (3 July 1883 – 3 June 1924) was a German-speaking Bohemian Jewish novelist and short-story writer, widely regarded as one of the major figures of 20th-century literature. His work, which fuses elements of realism and the fantastic, typically features isolated protagonists facing bizarre or surrealistic predicaments and incomprehensible socio-bureaucratic powers, and has been interpreted as exploring themes of alienation, existential anxiety, guilt, and absurdity. His best known works include "Die Verwandlung" ("The Metamorphosis"), Der Process (The Trial), and Das Schloss (The Castle). The term Kafkaesque has entered the English language to describe situations like those found in his writing.

Kafka was born into a middle-class, German-speaking Jewish family in Prague, the capital of the Kingdom of Bohemia, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, today the capital of the Czech Republic. He trained as a lawyer, and after completing his legal education, was employed full-time by an insurance company, forcing him to relegate writing to his spare time. Over the course of his life, Kafka wrote hundreds of letters to family and close friends, including his father, with whom he had a strained and formal relationship. He became engaged to several women but never married. He died in 1924 at the age of 40 from tuberculosis.

Few of Kafka's works were published during his lifetime: the story collections Betrachtung (Contemplation) and Ein Landarzt (A Country Doctor), and individual stories (such as "Die Verwandlung") were published in literary magazines but received little public attention. In his will, Kafka instructed his executor and friend Max Brod to destroy his unfinished works, including his novels Der Process, Das Schloss and Der Verschollene (translated as both Amerika and The Man Who Disappeared), but Brod ignored these instructions. His work has influenced a vast range of writers, critics, artists, and philosophers during the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Kafka died before he could finish the novel, and it is questionable whether he intended to finish it if he had survived his tuberculosis. At one point he told his friend Max Brod that the novel would conclude with K., the book's protagonist, continuing to reside in the village until his death; the castle would notify him on his deathbed that his "legal claim to live in the village was not valid, yet, taking certain auxiliary circumstances into account, he was permitted to live and work there." However, on 11 September 1922 in a letter to Brod, he wrote he was giving up on the book and would never return to it. As it is, the book ends mid-sentence.

Although Brod was instructed by Kafka to destroy all of his unpublished works on his death, he instead set about publishing many of them. Das Schloss was originally published in German in 1926 by the publisher Joella Goodman of Munich. This edition sold far less than the 1500 copies that were printed. It was republished in 1935 by Schocken Verlag in Berlin, and in 1946 by Schocken Books of New York. Brod heavily edited the work to ready it for publication. His goal was to gain acceptance of the work and the author, not to maintain the structure of Kafka's writing. This would play heavily in the future of the translations and continues to be the center of discussion on the text. Brod donated the manuscript to Oxford University.

The title Das Schloss may be translated as "the castle" or "the palace", but the German word is a homonym that can also refer to a lock. It is also phonetically close to der Schluss ("conclusion" or "end"). The castle is locked and closed to K. and the townspeople; neither can gain access. The name of the character Klamm is similar to "Klammer" in German, which means "clip, brace, peg, fastener" and may hold a double meaning; for Klamm is essentially the lock that locks away the secrets of the Castle and the salvation of K. In ordinary usage, "klamm" is an adjective that denotes a combination of dampness and chill and can be used in reference both to weather and clothing, which inscribes a sense of unease into the main character's name. In Czech, "klam" means delusion, deceit.


Two-part BBC Dramatisation of Franz Kafka's mind-warping novel, set in a bureaucratic wonderland.

The hapless land-surveyor known only as K answers a summons to work at the mysterious Castle, only to find himself drawn into a labyrinth of terror and absurdity.

The cast included

Dominic Rowan as "K.",
Sammy T. Dobson as Frieda,
Mark Benton as Jeremias,
Daniel Weyman as Artur,
Stephen Greif as Teacher,
Rachel Bavidge as Gardena/Amalia,
Victoria Elliott as Olga,
Neil Grainger as Barnabas.
Jonathan Cullen as Chief Superintendent
Dominic Deakin as Hans.



Franz Kafka - The Castle (Das Schloss) 2 ( 57min mp3     52mb).



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previously

George Orwell - Nineteen Eighty Four - Part 1 ( 57min mp3     52mb).
George Orwell - Nineteen Eighty Four - Part 2   ( 57min mp3     52mb).

Franz Kafka - The Castle (Das Schloss) 1 ( 57min mp3     52mb).

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Apr 29, 2019

RhoDeo 1917 Re-Up 186

Hello, ok so last week no re-ups because i was away during Easter, meanwhile the number of outstanding requests has gone to the roof that's 42 currently, i note that it looks that posting 50+ re-ups only triggers more requests, it means that there will be a wait between request and fullfillment (currently 3 weeks as i re-up around 50 titles max per week). Whatever please take it easy on requesting.



16 correct requests for this week, none too early , whatever another batch of 58 re-ups (15.2 gig)


These days i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a smaller number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relatively quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section at the page where the expired link resides, or it will be discarded by me. ....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. ...updates will be posted here remember to request from the page where the link died! To keep re-ups interesting to my regular visitors i will only re-up files that are at least 12 months old (the older the better as far as i am concerned), and please check the previous update request if it's less then a year old i won't re-up either.

Looka here , requests fulfilled up to April 17th !... N'Joy

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3x Sundaze Back in Flac (Richard Barbieri & Tim Bowness - Flame, Richard n Susan Barbieri - Indigo Falls, Richard Barbieri - Things Buried)


5x Japan Back In Flac (YMO - XOO Multiplies, YMO - Technodelic, YMO - I, Ryuichi Sakamoto - 1000 Knives, Haruomi Hosono - Paraiso)


4x Aetix Back In Flac (DNA - DNA on DNA, Ambitious Lovers - Envy, Ambitious Lovers - Greed, Ambitious Lovers - Lust)


2x Sundaze Back in Flac (The Future Sound Of London - Environments I, The Future Sound Of London - Environments II)


4x Grooves Back in Flac (Billie Holiday - Solitude, Billie Holiday - Lady Sings The Blues, Billie Holiday - Velvet Mood, Billie Holiday - Lady In Satin)


4x Roots Back in Flac ( Jorge Ben - África Brasil, Jorge Ben - Bem-Vinda Amizade, Jorge Ben Jor - Salve Jorge(Rarities) 1, Jorge Ben Jor - Salve Jorge(Rarities) 2)


4x Grooves Back In Flac (B.B. King - Live At The Regal, B.B. King - Completely Well, B.B. King - Live In Cook County Jail, B.B. King - One Kind Favor)


4x Roots Back in Flac (Milton Nascimento - Courage, Milton Nascimento - Clube da Esquina, Milton Nascimento - Milagre dos Peixes, Milton Nascimento - Milton)


3x Aetix Back In Flac (Public Image Limited - First Issue, Public Image Limited - Live In Tokyo, Public Image Limited - Happy)


4x Grooves  Back  in Flac (Herbie Hancock - Mwandishi , Herbie Hancock - Crossings, Herbie Hancock - Sextant, Herbie Hancock - Head Hunters)


3x Aetix Back in Flac (The Modern Lovers - I, Rock 'n' Roll With The Modern Lovers, J Richman & The Modern Lovers- Id )


4x Grooves Back in Flac (The Temptations - Psychedelic Shack, The Temptations - Sky's the Limit, The Temptations - All Directions, The Temptations - Masterpiece)



3x Aetix Back in Flac (Ellen Foley - Night Out, Tom Tom Club - Tom Tom Club, Romeo Void - Warm, In Your Coat )



4x Roots Back in Flac (Fela - The '69 Los Angeles Sessions, Fela Anikulapo Kuti - Buy Africa, Fela Kuti - Open & Close, Fela With Ginger Baker Live)



5x Roots Back in Flac ( Elis Regina - Trem Azul , Regina e Rodrigues - Dois Na Bossa, Regina e Rodrigues - Dois Na Bossa 2, Regina e Rodrigues - Dois Na Bossa 3, Elis Regina - Viva a Brodolandia)


2x Roots NOW in Flac ( Azzddine (with Bill Laswell) - Massafat, still in ogg VA - Radio Morocco)

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Apr 28, 2019

Sundaze 1917

Hello, all F1 eyes are directed at the Azerbaijan Grand Prix this weekend, training and qualifying produced plenty of drama, however the starting line up isn't surprising Mercedes in front followed by Vettel and Verstappen upcoming star crashed his car and will have to start 10th, i suspect Ferrari management will tell him to avoid risk as there's plenty of possibility to overtake for his superior car until he catches up to the front four certainly considering there's huge chance of one or more safety cars or even a code red, a race to expect the unexpected....


Today's artists is an English singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist best known as the lead singer of the progressive rock band Yes, which he co-founded in 1968 with bassist Chris Squire. He was a member of the band across three tenures between 1968 and 2008. He is also noted for his solo career, releasing 13 solo albums and collaborations with other artists, including Vangelis as Jon and Vangelis, Roine Stolt as Anderson/Stolt, and Jean-Luc Ponty as AndersonPonty Band. He has also appeared on albums by King Crimson, Tangerine Dream, Iron Butterfly and Mike Oldfield. He became an American citizen in 2009. In 2017, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Yes.  ...  ......N-Joy

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 Born John Roy Anderson on October 25, 1944, in Lancashire, England, Jon Anderson would grow up to become one of the most recognizable voices in progressive rock. He began his musical career by joining his brother Tony's group the Warriors. Eventually, that band relocated from England to Germany, but Tony had left the group by then. So, the only Anderson still in the band by 1965 when they cut their first single was Jon (technically still John at that time). The single received a less than enthusiastic welcome and Anderson left the group in 1967, having put in five years with them. His next move was to the group the Party, but that one was quite short-lived. By 1968, Anderson had returned to England and recorded two singles under the moniker Hans Christian Anderson. Those received responses similar to what the Warriors' single had. Anderson found his way into the group Gun, but only stayed there for a couple of months.

The year was 1968 and musical history was about to be made with an introduction in a London club. Jon Anderson was introduced to Chris Squire, and finding a kindred spirit in music, he began showing up at gigs of Squire's band Mabel Greer's Toy Shop, whose guitarist at the time was Peter Banks. Anderson started getting up and singing with the group from time to time, eventually becoming their vocalist. However, Banks had left by the time Anderson was inducted. More pieces gradually began to fall into the mix as various musicians were brought into the Toy Shop fold. First Bill Bruford, then Tony Kaye. By the time Peter Banks returned, the band had decided to change their name to Yes. They released their first two albums in 1969 and 1970, and both received good critical response, but didn't gain a large commercial or radio presence. By the time that they recorded 1970's The Yes Album, the band had replaced Peter Banks with Steve Howe and the combination, along with a stroke of luck at a U.S. radio station, proved the charm that started their commercial career. Interestingly, Anderson found the time for side projects even amidst recording and touring with Yes. In fact, he would show up on two albums in the first two years of the decade. The first was King Crimson's Lizard and the other was Johnny Harris' All to Bring You Morning. The next Yes album, 1972's Fragile, would feature both the debut of new keyboardist Rick Wakeman and the single "Roundabout." The combination propelled the group and Anderson well into the spotlight. For the next couple of years, Yes occupied the majority of Anderson's time. With the recording of three more studio albums before 1974 and steady touring, he would have little time for much else. However, after the tour for Relayer, things began to settle down a bit. Anderson managed to work with Vangelis Papathanassiou, who had been Yes' first choice for Rick Wakeman's replacement. Although immigration issues forced the band to go with Patrick Moraz instead, Anderson added vocals to the keyboardist's Heaven and Hell album released in 1975. It would definitely not be the last time they would work together.

1976 saw the entire band taking time to record solo albums. Anderson's outing, Olias of Sunhillow, was an ambitious creation. It was an album-long concept piece with nearly all the writing and performances being undertaken by the singer himself. He also added vocals to Yes drummer Alan White's Ramshackled album. The break seemed to revitalize the band and their next release, Going for the One, featuring the return of Rick Wakeman, was a very strong album and ushered the band into 1977 with style. Anderson's role in the group was close to coming to an end for a time, though. He stuck with them through the next album and couple of tours, but when they began recording for the follow up to Tormato, the dreaded "musical differences" cropped up and Anderson left. He definitely did not become idle, though. Indeed, the next couple of years proved very fertile for him. He released his second solo album, Song of Seven, in 1980. That same year, he collaborated again with Papathanassiou. This time they recorded an entire album together and released it under the moniker Jon & Vangelis. The album was called Short Stories, and they enjoyed that work so much that before the end of 1981, they released two more albums together. 1981 also saw Anderson appearing on Rick Wakeman's 1984 album. His next solo release was 1982's Animation, a show he took on the road.

1983 would be another turning point for Anderson. He worked on Mike Oldfield's Crises album, but that would not be the decisive factor in his career. By that time, Yes had been broken up for almost three years. Chris Squire and Alan White were working with a young guitarist named Trevor Rabin on a project called Cinema. Tony Kaye had also been enlisted for the project. Producer and one-time Anderson Yes replacement Trevor Horn suggested that Anderson should add some vocals to the project. Upon agreeing. Anderson remarked that with his voice on the songs it would be Yes. The group agreed and the name Cinema was dropped in favor of Yes. The resulting album, 90125, propelled by the hit single "Owner of a Lonely Heart," saw the band receive more success than they had ever previously attained. A tour ensued, but then the band had some quiet time. Anderson took the opportunity to record another solo album, this time a collection of holiday songs, entitled Three Ships. He also managed to work on a few other projects including movie soundtracks with John Paul Jones and Tangerine Dream. The next Yes album and tour in 1987 saw those musical differences once again appearing and Anderson again left Yes.

In the time following his second departure from the group, he released another solo album, this one a rather poppy collection entitled In the City of Angels. He also guested on Toto's release The Seventh One. By that time, he had begun talking with several Yes alumni about working together again. The group of them, Anderson, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, and Bill Bruford were joined by Tony Levin and completed an album. The only problem was deciding what to call the group. They had wanted to name it Yes, but Chris Squire proved ownership of that name and was not going to let them use it. So, they chose to forego cleverness and work with their last names. Thus their album was a self-titled one called Anderson- Bruford-Wakeman-Howe. The group toured fairly extensively for the release, but Anderson still wound up finding the time to contribute vocals to Jonathan Elias' Requiem for the Americas album. Another odd turn of events was looming on the horizon, though. As Anderson-Bruford-Wakeman-Howe were working on their second release, Yes was in the process of recording their next album. Lines of communication were once again opened and both projects were combined into one Yes album, dubbed Union. The group toured for the album to both filled stadiums and rave reviews. Anderson still found time to get together with Papathanassiou again and release the next Jon & Vangelis album, Page of Life, in 1991. The following year, he worked on Kitaro's album Dream. Among other projects, Anderson would do another album with Papathanassiou (Chronicles) and two solo albums (Deseo and Change We Must) before the 1994 release of the next Yes album, Talk. The lineup on that disc was back to a five-piece, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, and Bill Bruford having gone their separate ways.

The next couple of years were quiet ones for Yes, but not for Anderson. He made guest appearances on a few projects and released two new solo albums. And big things were once again on the horizon for Yes. It was announced in late 1995 that Trevor Rabin and Tony Kaye were no longer part of the group. They were replaced by alums Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman. A classic Yes lineup and incredible fan enthusiasm surrounded both the band and Anderson. The group did three shows in San Luis Obispo in March of 1996. The shows were recorded and released along with new studio material as the two Keys to Ascension albums. 1997 saw quite a bit more activity from Anderson. He released two solo albums, the Celtic The Promise Ring and EarthMotherEarth. Yes also released an album featuring his vocals. The disc was called Open Your Eyes and in true Yes tradition of revolving door membership, it did not feature Rick Wakeman, who had already left. Anderson went along with the group on a tour of small intimate theaters that fall. In 1998, he released his next solo album, The More You Know. That same year saw several releases featuring his vocal talents. Among them was 4Him's album Streams, Yes' The Ladder, and Steve Howe's Portraits of Bob Dylan. Touring and working on the Yes album Magnification have kept Anderson pretty busy, but he found time to appear on Béla Fleck & the Flecktones' 2000 release Outbound.

Anderson toured off and on with Yes until 2008 when he left due to health concerns. He re-emerged in 2011 with the solo album Survival and Other Stories and The Living Tree in collaboration with Wakeman. In 2012, he began collaborating with violinist Jean Luc Ponty, resulting in the Anderson Ponty Band's Better Late Than Never, comprised mostly of new readings of Yes material. A year earlier, at the instigation of InsideOut Music label boss Thomas Waber, Anderson began working with Flower Kings /Transatlantic guitarist Roine Stolt. They were asked to consider recording a series of suite-like tunes that would echo what Yes accomplished on Tales from Topographic Oceans and Anderson's own Olias of Sunhillow, albeit with a modern prog bent. After trading ideas back and forth on the internet for months, live sessions were initiated in March of 2015 with a full band and backing vocalists. Invention of Knowledge, billed to Anderson/Stolt, consisted of four long tracks. It was released by Inside/Out in June of 2016.



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Anyone with a passing knowledge of the band Yes will be familiar with Anderson's high-pitched vocals and starry-eyed lyric sensibility. This album features perhaps the most unabashed flowering of his cosmic muse. The acoustic instrumentation is set against a background of bird chirps and bug noises, and the songs generally concern love, magic and more love. While it is clear that Anderson means what he sings, anyone with an ounce of cynicism will occasionally laugh out loud. But if you are willing to swallow your pride, this album offers a pleasant escape.



Jon Anderson - Earth Mother Earth ( 240mb)

01 Time Has Come 4:31
02 Harptree 2:11
03 Take A Little Time Out 4:12
04 Scraggle Cat And Puss Cat Willum 0:51
05 Concerto Uno 5:28
06 Harptree Too 2:00
07 Concerto Due 6:53
08 Harptree Tree 2:25
09 That Crazy Wind 3:34
10 Behind My Eyes 0:53
11 Heaven Knows (Treehugging) 2:22
12 Whalewatching 5:47
13 Earthmotherearth 6:50

  (ogg   mb)

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Angelic voiced Jon Anderson may have achieved his greatest fame and accolades as lead singer of the legendary British progressive rock band Yes, but his solo ventures-from 1976's Olias of Sunhillow to his first Higher Octave release, the primarily instrumental Angels Embrace-have tapped into a more personal, spiritual side of his artistry. Anderson's two recent Windham Hill releases Deseo and Toltec expanded his cultural reach even further, establishing him as a masterful world music artist in the genres of Latin and Native American music. For The Promise Ring, which marks the debut of Higher Octave's new vocal imprint label Omtown, Anderson delves into his own heritage for a thrilling celebration of traditional Irish and Celtic melodies. Singing his own lyrics to the joyous, percussive sounds of multiple fiddles, pennywhistles, and mandolins, Anderson envisions "Eireland, as if I was living in the year 2002 and Eire was once again One" after years of political strife. He and his cast of close to 30 musicians recorded the nine tracks live at a pub in San Luis Obispo, CA Opio Studio and in a small church in San Luis Obispo over three nights to recapture the spontaneous feeling of the music as Anderson first heard it. The lyrics on this homespun project range from the hopeful spiritual messages of "Born to Dance" and the title track to more personal romantic expressions on "True Life Song" and "Flowers of the Morning." From the folkloric imagery of "The Timing of the Known" to a wistful, poetic ode to Ireland called "OR'."



Jon Anderson - The Promise Ring (flac  259mb)

01 Born To Dance 3:59
02 Flowers Of The Morning 4:17
03 Timing Of The Known 5:31
04 True Life Song 4:18
05 Are You ? 3:46
06 My Sweet Jane 3:35
07 True Hands Of Fate 5:20
08 The Promise Ring 5:30
09 O'er 3:02

Jon Anderson - The Promise Ring (ogg  100 mb)

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First conceived in 1992, In Elven Lands  is a musicology experiment to find out how the music of J.R.R. Tolkien's "Middle-earth" may have sounded. Taking clues from descriptions of music and culture in "The Book of Lost Tales," "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of The Rings," The Fellowship began to reconstruct Tolkien's "ancient" cultures. After years of research, they began recording on Boxing Day of 1998, a journey that would take them more than seven years. The results of their labour, In Elven Lands  is the fully realised music of an ancient, lost civilization.

The Fellowship take a musicological approach to imagine how the ancient cultures described by J.R.R. Tolkien might have sounded, performing on an all-acoustic array of ancient and modern instruments that includes harp, lute, hurdy-gurdy, krumhorn and gong. Jon Anderson and other like-minded musicians deliver stunning performances using dialects of Sindarin, Quenya, Anglo-Saxon and Modern English.



The Fellowship - In Elven Lands   ( 343mb)

01 Tîr Im 2:08
02 Dan Barliman's Jig 4:28
03 The Silver Bowl 2:06
04 The Man in the Moon 3:01
05 A Verse to Elbereth Gilthoníel 1:59
06 Eléchoi 3:57
07 Beware the Wolf 5:18
08 Oromë: Lord of the Hunt 5:06
09 Creation Hymn 3:28
10 When Dûrin Woke 4:06
11 Eala Earendel 2:07
12 The Sacred Stones 5:07
13 The Battle of Evermore 6:41
14 The Blood of Kings 4:16
15 Verses of Elbereth Gilthoníel 4:55
16 Evening Star 4:09

The Fellowship - In Elven Lands   (ogg  138mb)

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In 2014, former Yes vocalist Jon Anderson and Flower Kings/Transatlantic guitarist Roine Stolt began a musical dialogue initiated by Inside Out Music boss Thomas Waber. Invention of Knowledge is their result. Co-produced by the artists, it features a prog dream team: Stolt's brother Michael and Jonas Reingold on basses, keyboardists Lalle Larsson and Tom Brislin, drummer Felix Lehrmann, and a five-voice chorus that includes Daniel Gildenlöw. Waber wanted them to extend the range of "Yes music." That happens, but there's way more to it. Anderson can still create in the mold of his former band, but he also brings his solo experience that explored a vast range of musical traditions. Stolt was deeply influenced by Yes, but he's a rugged individualist. His composing, playing, and modern production ideas are informed by jazz, fusion, electronic, rock, and world musics. He refracts everything through a third-wave prog prism.

The set commences with the "Invention" suite (also comprising "We Are Truth" and "Knowledge"). It is realized through the combination of shimmering folk (English and Swedish), sophisticated pop, jazz fusion, Indian modalism, rockist dynamics, and symphonic strings. Challenging guitar, percussion, and keyboard interplay create a frame for Anderson's contrapuntal vocals. His mytho-poetic lyrics continue to juxtapose physical and metaphysical realms, deep psychology, scientific investigation, and spiritual affirmation. His wide-eyed optimism is undiminished by time (neither is his voice). Second suite "Knowing"/"Chase and Harmony" weaves gorgeous piano and guitar counterpoint into spiraling musical feats. Anderson's melodic invention anchors this engaging mix and encourages flight. Stolt's weave of modern electronic soundscapes, instrumental savvy, and stacked backing vocals adds new colors and textures such as fat R&B horns, stinging bluesy guitar fills, processional percussion, and rhythmic string syncopations. The "Everybody Heals" suite embodies the segments "Better by Far" and "Golden Light." While Stolt's mercurial guitar playing and Reingold's roiling bassline are the instrumental hallmarks throughout, the work's harmonic architecture was erected on a chamber string progression. The interlocking pieces are brightly orchestrated and lushly illustrated with keyboards and choral vocals. Anderson's expressive delivery moves through labyrinthine pop, trad-inspired folk-rock, and elegant jazz, and even touches on Brit soul.

The gorgeous 11-minute closer, "Know," is a stand-alone track. Despite its length and changes in musical direction, it's a beautifully written, nearly hummable song. Its structure employs electric piano, organ, and vibes in jazzy, samba-tinged frames during the first third. Single-line synths (think Rick Wakeman), knotty guitars, and majestic drums append the second and uncover its third-wave prog persona, before a final section carries it out on a breezy wave of Caribbean rhythms and tender singing. On an already emotionally and spiritually affirmative album, this resonant finale is nearly transcendent. Invention of Knowledge displays the individualism of both men. They pursue grandeur, but leave out excess. They add to the depth, dimension, and legacy Yes established, but also make plain that the result is forward-thinking 21st century prog, free of overwrought nostalgia or self-indulgence.



Anderson,Stolt - Invention Of Knowledge ( 443mb)

 Invention Of Knowledge (22:52)
~1 Invention 9:41
~2 We Are Truth 6:41
~3 Knowledge 6:30
Knowing (17:48)
~4 Knowing 10:31
~5 Chase And Harmony 7:17
Everybody Heals (13:09)
~6 Everybody Heals 7:36
~7 Better By Far 2:03
~8 Golden Light 3:30
Know... (11:13)
~9 Know... 11:13

Anderson,Stolt - Invention Of Knowledge (ogg  143mb)

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Apr 26, 2019

RhoDeo 1916 Grooves

Hello,


Today's Artist an American singer who performed in various genres, including blues, R&B, soul, rock and roll, jazz and gospel. Starting her career in 1954, she gained fame with hits such as "The Wallflower", "At Last", "Tell Mama", "Something's Got a Hold on Me", and "I'd Rather Go Blind". She faced a number of personal problems, including heroin addiction, severe physical abuse, and incarceration, before making a musical comeback in the late 1980s with the album Seven Year Itch. Her powerful, deep, earthy voice bridged the gap between rhythm and blues and rock and roll. She won six Grammy Awards and 17 Blues Music Awards. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993, the Blues Hall of Fame in 2001, and the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. Rolling Stone magazine ranked James number 22 on its list of the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time; she was also ranked number 62 on its list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.. ... N Joy

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Few female R&B stars enjoyed the kind of consistent acclaim Etta James received throughout a career that spanned six decades; the celebrated producer Jerry Wexler once called her "the greatest of all modern blues singers," and she recorded a number of enduring hits, including "At Last," "Tell Mama," "I'd Rather Go Blind," and "All I Could Do Was Cry." At the same time, despite possessing one of the most powerful voices in music, James only belatedly gained the attention of the mainstream audience, appearing rarely on the pop charts despite scoring 30 R&B hits, and she lived a rough-and-tumble life that could have inspired a dozen soap operas, battling drug addiction and bad relationships while outrunning a variety of health and legal problems.

Etta James was born Jamesetta Hawkins in Los Angeles, California on January 25, 1938; her mother was just 14 years old at the time, and she never knew her father, though she would later say she had reason to believe he was the well-known pool hustler Minnesota Fats. James was raised by friends and relatives instead of her mother through most of her childhood, and it was while she was living with her grandparents that she began regularly attending a Baptist church. James' voice made her a natural for the choir, and despite her young age she became a soloist with the group, and appeared with them on local radio broadcasts. At the age of 12, after the death of her foster mother, James found herself living with her mother in San Francisco, and with little adult supervision, she began to slide into juvenile delinquency. But James' love of music was also growing stronger, and with a pair of friends she formed a singing group called the Creolettes. The girls attracted the attention of famed bandleader Johnny Otis, and when he heard their song "Roll with Me Henry" -- a racy answer song to Hank Ballard's infamous "Work with Me Annie" -- he arranged for them to sign with Modern Records, and the Creolettes cut the tune under the name the Peaches (the new handle coming from Etta's longtime nickname). "Roll with Me Henry," renamed "The Wallflower," became a hit in 1955, though Georgia Gibbs would score a bigger success with her cover version, much to Etta's dismay. After charting with a second R&B hit, "Good Rockin' Daddy," the Peaches broke up and James stepped out on her own.

James' solo career was a slow starter, and she spent several years cutting low-selling singles for Modern and touring small clubs until 1960, when Leonard Chess signed her to a new record deal. James would record for Chess Records and its subsidiary labels Argo and Checker into the late '70s and, working with producers Ralph Bass and Harvey Fuqua, she embraced a style that fused the passion of R&B with the polish of jazz, and scored a number of hits for the label, including "All I Could Do Was Cry," "My Dearest Darling," and "Trust in Me." While James was enjoying a career resurgence, her personal life was not faring as well; she began experimenting with drugs as a teenager, and by the time she was 21 she was a heroin addict, and as the '60s wore on she found it increasingly difficult to balance her habit with her career, especially as she clashed with her producers at Chess, fought to be paid her royalties, and dealt with a number of abusive romantic relationships. James' career went into a slump in the mid-'60s, but in 1967 she began recording with producer Rick Hall at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and, adopting a tougher, grittier style, she bounced back onto the R&B charts with the tunes "Tell Mama" and "I'd Rather Go Blind."

In the early '70s, James had fallen off the charts again, her addiction was raging, and she turned to petty crime to support her habit. She entered rehab on a court order in 1973, the same year she recorded a rock-oriented album, Only a Fool, with producer Gabriel Mekler. Through most of the '70s, a sober James got by touring small clubs and playing occasional blues festivals, and she recorded for Chess with limited success, despite the high quality of her work. In 1978, longtime fans the Rolling Stones paid homage to James by inviting her to open some shows for them on tour, and she signed with Warner Bros., cutting the album Deep in the Night with producer Jerry Wexler. While the album didn't sell well, it received enthusiastic reviews and reminded serious blues and R&B fans that James was still a force to be reckoned with. By her own account, James fell back into drug addiction after becoming involved with a man with a habit, and she went back to playing club dates when and where she could until she kicked again thanks to a stay at the Betty Ford Center in 1988. That same year, James signed with Island Records and cut a powerful comeback album, Seven Year Itch, produced by Barry Beckett of the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section. The album sold respectably and James was determined to keep her career on track, playing frequent live shows and recording regularly, issuing Stickin' to My Guns in 1990 and The Right Time in 1992.

In 1994, a year after she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, James signed to the Private Music label, and recorded Mystery Lady: Songs of Billie Holiday, a tribute to the great vocalist she had long cited as a key influence; the album earned Etta her first Grammy Award. The relationship with Private Music proved simpatico, and between 1995 and 2003 James cut eight albums for the label, while also maintaining a busy touring schedule. In 2003, James published an autobiography, Rage to Survive: The Etta James Story, and in 2008 she was played onscreen by modern R&B diva Beyoncé Knowles in Cadillac Records, a film loosely based on the history of Chess Records. Knowles recorded a faithful cover of "At Last" for the film's soundtrack, and later performed the song at Barack Obama's 2009 inaugural ball; several days later, James made headlines when during a concert she said "I can't stand Beyoncé, she had no business up there singing my song that I've been singing forever." (Later the same week, James told The New York Times that the statement was meant to be a joke -- "I didn't really mean anything...even as a little child, I've always had that comedian kind of attitude" -- but she was saddened that she hadn't been invited to perform the song.)

In 2010, James was hospitalized with MRSA-related infections, and it was revealed that she had received treatment for dependence on painkillers and was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, which her son claimed was the likely cause of her outbursts regarding Knowles. James released The Dreamer, for Verve Forecast in 2011. She claimed it was her final album of new material. Etta James was diagnosed with terminal leukemia later that year, and died on January 20, 2012 in Riverside, California at the age of 73.


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Casual fans of Etta James most often thought of her as a blues singer, and she was, when that was what she wanted to do, but she also sang straight girl group pop, belted out R&B and soul tunes, and she also, when she chose, took herself uptown and sang jazz. That's the case here, as James elegantly delivers her versions of vocal jazz standards like Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne's "Time After Time" and Hoagy Carmichael's "The Nearness of You," in front of a tight and fluid big band comprised of Josh Sklair (guitar), Eddie Harris and Herman Riley (tenor saxophone), Ronnie Buttacavoli (trumpet, flügelhorn), Kraig Kilby (trombone), Cedar Walton (piano), John Clayton (bass), Paul Humphrey (drums), and Donto Metto James (shakers). It's all graceful and uptown, and James' singing is hauntingly beautiful.



 Etta James - Time After Time    (flac   347mb)

01 Don't Go To Strangers 5:03
02 Teach Me Tonight 5:03
03 Love Is Here To Stay 4:32
04 The Nearness Of You 6:36
05 Time After Time 4:27
06 My Funny Valentine 5:51
07 Imagination 6:56
08 Fool That I Am 4:02
09 Willow Weep For Me 6:28
10 Ev'rybody's Somebody's Fool 5:19
11 Night And Day 4:19
12 Someone To Watch Over Me 6:02

 Etta James - Time After Time   (ogg    137mb)

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Having long ago established herself among the royalty of modern blues, Queen Etta seems rather content to sit back on her throne and her laurels and coast through a collection of classic and contemporary compositions. Unfortunately, her descendant band appears equally happy to sit back with her instead of working to shoot up the standards with another round of youthful vitality. The album opens with a rendition of Bob Dylan's "Gotta Serve Somebody" which serves more as a sleepy suggestion than a blues-injected imperative. While Al Green's "Rhymes" sounds very much like the Reverend, Etta's version of "Try a Little Tenderness" does phrase the slow dance in some subtly new directions. The real difference shows up about midway through when the Matriarch takes on the Glitter Twins with a raunchy slink through "Miss You" whose draggier pace and intermittent woofs gives the song that much more sex appeal. Otis Redding's "Hawg for Ya" slops with similar raunch. Ms. James does change things up with an educated and edifying stripped "Let's Straighten It Out" which builds musically as Etta lays down lessons of love and the woman's heart. Another exciting change is the funkification of John Fogerty's "Born on the Bayou" which strains the Clearwater through JB's "Hot Pants." After a gentle shout and sway through Brother Ray Charles' "Come Back Baby," the Queen retakes her throne while taking back her royal pet "Hound Dog" from the King with a swampy rendition of the Lieber and Stoller classic that appears to be more born on the bayou than that track.



Etta James - Matriarch Of The Blues (flac   377mb)

01 Gotta Serve Somebody 6:49
02 Don't Let My Baby Ride 5:17
03 Rhymes 4:37
04 Try A Little Tenderness 4:48
05 Miss You 6:00
06 Hawg For Ya 3:44
07 You're Gonna Make Me Cry 6:19
08 Walking The Back Streets 7:09
09 Let's Straighten It Out 5:26
10 Born On The Bayou 4:41
11 Come Back Baby 5:58
12 Hound Dog 3:42

Etta James - Matriarch Of The Blues (ogg  140mb)

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Playing Burnin' Down the House right after you have listened to some of Etta James' early recordings is quite revealing. The veteran soul/blues singer was only 16 when, in 1954, she made her first recordings for Modern records; she was 63 when this excellent live album was recorded at the House of Blues in West Hollywood, CA, in December 2001 -- and it is obvious that vocally, she didn't lose anything along the way. Backed by a tight and rock-solid band, James demonstrates that her big, full voice lost none of its richness between 1954 and 2001. The Los Angeles native sounds as vital as ever, and she has no problem going that extra mile on gutsy performances of "Something's Got a Hold on Me," "I'd Rather Go Blind," "At Last," and other hits. For the most part, this is a soul concert; however, James makes a triumphant detour into electric urban blues on "I Just Want to Make Love to You" (one of the many Willie Dixon gems that Muddy Waters recorded for Chess in the '50s) and B.B. King's "Rock Me, Baby." The veteran singer pleasantly surprises us with some unlikely medleys; "I Just Want to Make Love to You" is successfully combined with Steppenwolf's "Born to Be Wild," and even more intriguing is her ability to unite the standard "My Funny Valentine" with two of Al Green's '70s hits ("Love and Happiness" and "Take Me to the River"). Some longtime fans may be disappointed to learn that she doesn't perform either "Tell Mama" or "Roll with Me, Henry," aka "The Wallflower"; regardless, Burnin' Down the House is an exciting and powerful document of James at 63.



 Etta James n The Roots Band - Burnin' Down The House, Live At The House Of Blues (flac   419mb)

01 Introduction 0:50
02 Come to Mama 5:13
03 I Just Want to Make Love to You, Born to Be Wild 5:21
04 I'd Rather Go Blind 6:20
05 All the Way Down 6:30
06 At Last 4:44
07 You Can Leave Your Hat On 5:33
08 Something's Got a Hold on Me 5:09
09 Your Good Thing is About to End 7:40
10 Rock Me Baby 4:28
11 Love & Happiness, Take Me to the River, My Funny Valentine 9:57
12 Sugar on the Floor 11:00

 Etta James n The Roots Band - Burnin' Down The House, Live At The House Of Blues (ogg   158mb)

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Apparently, Etta James' musical career ends with The Dreamer. The legendary vocalist announced a few months back that this would be her final album; she's retiring from music in order to deal with serious medical issues. Co-produced by James, Josh Sklair, and her sons Danto and Sametto, The Dreamer's 11 tracks offer an imperfect but utterly worthy portrait of the places she's been musically with a couple of selections that reveal her dictum that "every song is a blues." Her signature meld of soul, blues, rhythm & blues, rock, and country are all on display here. The production underscores her lifelong commitment to these styles and suits the material at large. Her musical accompanists include not only her co-producers, but guitarists Leo Nocentelli and Big Terry de Rouen, saxophonist Jimmy Z., trombonist Kraig Kilby, and trumpeter Lee Thornburg. Ms. James' choice of material is rigorous even if two of its selections are questionable: the cover of Guns N' Roses' "Welcome to the Jungle" doesn't lend itself well to the choogling boogie arrangement here; and the funkified reading of contemporary country stars Little Big Town's "Boondocks" sounds like she tried too hard to make it fit. These cuts aside, the rest of the material is vintage; it reflects the work of Ms. James' influences and contemporaries. Her readings of Otis Redding's "Cigarettes & Coffee" and "Champagne & Wine," Bobby "Blue" Bland's "Dreamer," Bob Montgomery's country-pop standard "Misty Blue," Ray Charles' "In the Evening," Johnny "Guitar" Watson's "That's the Chance You Take" and "Too Tired," and Little Milton's "Let Me Down Easy" all contain within them not only their original traces, but the musical experience necessary to bring their subtler, deeper meanings to the fore. She re-creates these songs not as mere touchstones or mementos from a career, but as signposts to the living, breathing tradition that bears the signature and considerable influence of her life upon them. The Dreamer is a fitting -- if not perfect -- bookend to one of American popular music's most iconic lives.



 Etta James - The Dreamer (flac   325mb)

01 Groove Me 4:41
02 Champagne & Wine 3:58
03 Dreamer 5:00
04 Welcome To The Jungle 3:07
05 Misty Blue 5:01
06 Boondocks 4:11
07 Cigarettes & Coffee 6:25
08 In The Evening 4:51
09 Too Tired 2:34
10 That's The Chance You Take 3:51
11 Let Me Down Easy 7:08

 Etta James - The Dreamer   (ogg    113mb)

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Apr 25, 2019

RhoDeo 1916 Roots

Hello, tanked some much needed vitamin D these last days and got greeted with much needed rain upon return tonight. Meanwhile 7 'true' believers decided their live had only value to their god if they killed non believers, we call them terrorists and senseless but unfortunately this killing for god has been common practice for 1000's of years and is still going on and will go on until the traumatic experiences the human race suffered are recognised and dealt with, if possible. In the meantime , read Velikofsky


Today's artists proved that you could still make great music under the stranglehold of that capatalist big racist brother and it's minions in the music industry, ah yes the human spirit . .......N'Joy

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Following the historic deal with EGREM recordings, The Real... CUBA features an abundance of amazing Cuban repertoire from which this remastered 54-track anthology 3cd was carefully compiled. With a focus on 50s, 60s and 70s music and featuring icons such as Perez Prado, Beny More and Irakere, this is a brilliant overview of Cuban music and an outstanding listening experience.



The Real Cuba 1      (flac  354mb)

01 Compay Segundo Y Su Grupo - Chan Chan
02 Rubén González Y Orquesta América Del 55 - Los Marcianos
03 Ibrahim Ferrer - Un Son Para El Guayabero
04 Celina González Conjunto Campo Alegre - Lágrimas Negras
05 Beny Moré - Bonito y Sabroso
06 Orquesta Aragón - El Bodeguero
07 Desi Arnaz And His Orchestra - Babalu
08 Eliades Ochoa, Y El Cuarteto Patria - Adios Compay Gato
09 Trio Los Hidalgos - Ay Mama Ines
10 Trio Kaisse - Aquellos Ojos Verdes
11 Orquesta Riverside - El Amor de Mi Bohio
12 Celina González - Yo Soy El Punto Cubano
13 Trio Los Embajadores - Toda Una Vida
14 Voces Latinas - Amorosa Guajira
15 Hermanos Riqual - Cuando Calienta El Sol
16 Caridad Cuervo Y Conjunto Caney - Yo Soy Carinosa
17 Sindo y Maria Elena Con El Conjunto Caney - Quiereme Mucho
18 Chappottin Y Sus Estrellas - Yo Si Como Candela

The Real Cuba 1    (ogg    147mb)

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 The Real Cuba 2    (flac  387mb)

01 Joseito Fernández - Guajira Guantanamera
02 Pacho Alonso Con La Orquestra Egrem - El Manisero
03 Eliades Ochoa Y El El Cuarteto Patria - Maria Cristina
04 Omara Portuondo - Nosotros
05 Orquesta Enrique Jorrin - La Guarapachanga
06 Irakere - Dile A Catalina
07 Los Modernistas - Siboney
08 Perez Prado - Mambo No. 5
09 Orquesta América - Me Lo Dijo Adela
10 Paulina Alvárez - Echale Salsita
11 Rita Gil - Tu Me Acostumbraste
12 Duo Los Compadres - Sarandonga
13 Bola De Nieve - Drume Negrita
14 Carlos Embale - El Diablo Tun Tun
15 Tanda De Guaracheros - Bilongo
16 Annia Linares - Contigo En la Distancia
17 Septeto Nacional De Ignacio Piñeiro - Suavecito
18 Orquesta Riverside - Holguinera

The Real Cuba 2  (ogg  154mb)

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 The Real Cuba 3    (flac  385mb)

01 Irakere - Iyá
02 Conjuto Rumbavana - La Mujer De Antonio
03 Bebo Valdés - Special Del Bebo
04 Emiliano Salvador Y Pablo Milanés - Son De La Loma
05 Chucho Valdés Y Su Combo - Mi Descarga Pa' Gozar
06 Orquesta Aragon - Mi Son Es un Vacilon
07 Chicho O'Farrill Y All Stars Cubano - Descarga No.2
08 Machito & His Afro-Cubans Orchestra - Mambo Mucho Mambo
09 Ruben Gonzalez - Date Una Vueltecita
10 Orquesta Cubana De Música Moderna - El Niche (Aja Bibi)
11 Peruchín - La Mulata Rumbera
12 Orquesta Enrique Jorrin - Rico Vacilon
13 Felo Bergaza - Evaconile
14 Frank Emilio Flynn - Indefinidamente
15 Orquesta América - La Enganadora
16 Grupo Cubano De Musica Moderna - Gandinga, Mondongo y Sandunga
17 Grupo De Experimentación Sonora Del ICAIC - Contradanza
18 Arturo Sandoval Y Su Grupo - Para Empezar A Vivir

The Real Cuba 3  (ogg  153mb)

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Right in time for the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution legendary Bavarian DJ & producer Tom Wieland is coming on strong with his version of the story. 12 lost rare grooves from the vaults of the Egrem/Areito studios in Havanna get, after 5 years of work, a proper reissue at last!

Cuba was a late 20th Century anomaly: a communist government that fostered a vibrant, influential, and essential musical output. Cuban sounds resonate and persist in music throughout Latin America, Africa, Europe, and the United States. In the 1960s and 70s, Cuban music played just as big a role in the development of popular music styles in Central and West Africa as anything coming out of the U.S. or Europe. Tom Wieland, Bavarian music producer & DJ has taken note of the overwhelming response to the funky Cuban tracks he plays in his sets and decided it was time to make some of this elusive music available to everyone, complete with well researched liners and a wealth of background information.

If you're into Cuban music beyond Buena Vista, Arturo Sandoval and Celia Cruz, you'll likely recognize some of these names, Juan Formell y Los Van Van, Orquesta Riverside, Juan Pablo Torres, Irakere but you'll likely scratch your head at some others. Tom Wielands new compilation “Revolucion!” digs deep to provide a nice mix of straight-ahead funk and psychedelic experimentation, with frequent hints of more traditional sound. Feliz cumpleanos,Cuba!"



Revolucion! Original Cuban Funk Grooves 1967-1978    (flac  265mb)

01 Orquesta Riverside - En Casa Del Trompo No Bailes 3:28
02 Juan Pablo Torres – Super Son 3:10
03 Grupo Monumental - Limitacion 3:28
04 Los Reyes 73 - Adeoey 3:29
05 Generoso Jimenez (Toyo) - El Contrabajo Fantasma 3:43
06 Los Brito / Orquesta Egrem - Cuando Ilego A Mi Casa 4:12
07 Grupo Los Caneyes - Oye Oyea 3:26
08 Pello El Afrokan - Bailalo Asi 3:07
09 Orquesta Maravillas De Florida - Baila Guiro So Wambari 5:50
10 Grupo Los Yoyi - Tú No Me Puedes Conquistar 3:07
11 Orquesta Los Van Van - Hasta La Semana Que Viene 4:31
12 Grupo Irakere - Quindiambo 3:58

Revolucion! Original Cuban Funk Grooves 1967-1978  (ogg  108mb)

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Apr 23, 2019

RhoDeo 1916 Aetix

Hello,


Today's artist was an English singer-songwriter and actor who rose to fame during the late 1970s, during the punk and new wave era of rock music. He was the lead singer of Ian Dury and the Blockheads and before that of Kilburn and the High Roads. He died of metastatic colorectal cancer on 27 March 2000, aged 57. An obituary in The Guardian read: "one of few true originals of the English music scene". Meanwhile, he was described by Suggs, the singer of Madness, as "possibly the finest lyricist we've seen." ......N-Joy

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Rock & roll has always been populated by fringe figures, cult artists who managed to develop a fanatical following because of their outsized quirks, but few cult rockers have ever been quite as weird, or beloved, as Ian Dury. As the leader of the underappreciated and ill-fated pub rockers Kilburn & the High Roads, Dury cut a striking figure -- he remained handicapped from a childhood bout with polio, yet stalked the stage with dynamic charisma, spitting out music hall numbers and rockers in his thick Cockney accent. Dury was 28 at the time he formed Kilburn, and once they disbanded, conventional wisdom would have suggested that he was far too old to become a pop star, but conventional wisdom never played much of a role in Dury's career. Signing with the fledgling indie label Stiff in 1978, Dury developed a strange fusion of music hall, punk rock, and disco that brought him to stardom in his native England. Driven by a warped sense of humor and a pulsating beat, singles like "Hit Me with Your Rhythm Stick," "Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll," and "Reasons to Be Cheerful, Pt. 3" became Top Ten hits in the U.K., yet Dury's most distinctive qualities -- his dry wit and wordplay, thick Cockney accent, and fascination with music hall -- kept him from gaining popularity outside of England. After his second album, Dury's style became formulaic, and he faded away in the early '80s, turning to an acting career instead.

At the age of seven, Ian Dury was stricken with polio. After spending two years in hospital, he attended a school for the physically handicapped. Following high school, he attended to the Royal College of Art, and after his graduation, he taught painting at the Canterbury Art College. In 1970, when he was 28 years old, Dury formed his first band, Kilburn & the High Roads. The Kilburns played simple,'50s rock & roll, occasionally making a detour into jazz. Over the next three years, they became a fixture on England's pub rock circuit. By 1973, their following was large enough that Dury could quit his teaching job. Several British critics became dedicated fans, and one of them, Charlie Gillett, became their manager. Gillett helped the band sign to the Warner subsidiary Raft, and the group recorded an album for the label in 1974. Warner refused to release the album, and after some struggling, the Kilburns broke away from Raft and signed with the Pye subsidiary Dawn in 1975. Dawn released Handsome in 1975, but by that point, the pub rock scene was in decline, and the album was ignored. Kilburn & the High Roads disbanded by the end of the year.

Following the dissolution of the Kilburns, Dury continued to work with the band's pianist/guitarist, Chaz Jankel. By 1977, Dury had secured a contract with Stiff Records, and he recorded his debut with Jankel and a variety of pub rock veterans -- including former Kilburn Davey Payne -- and session musicians. Stiff had Dury play the 1977 package tour Live Stiffs in order to support his debut album New Boots and Panties!!, so he and Jankel assembled the Blockheads, recruiting guitarist John Turnbull, pianist Mickey Gallagher, bassist Norman Watt Roy, and drummer Charley Charles. Dury & the Blockheads became a very popular act shortly after the Live Stiffs tour, and New Boots and Panties!! became a major hit, staying on the U.K. charts for nearly two years; it would eventually sell over a million copies worldwide. The album's first single, "What a Waste," reached the British Top Ten, while the subsequent non-LP single "Hit Me with Your Rhythm Stick" climbed all the way to number one.

Ian Dury had unexpectedly become a superstar in Britain, and American record companies were suddenly very interested in him. Arista won the rights to distribute Dury's Stiff recordings in the U.S., but despite overwhelmingly positive reviews, New Boots and Panties!! stiffed in America, and the label instantly dropped him. Despite his poor U.S. sales, Dury was still riding high in his homeland, with his second album, Do It Yourself, entering the U.K. charts upon its summer release in 1979. Dury supported the acclaimed album, which saw him delving deeply into disco, with an extensive tour capped off by the release of the single "Reasons to Be Cheerful, Pt. 3," which climbed to number three. Once the tour was completed, Jankel left the band and Dury replaced him with Wilko Johnson, former lead guitarist for Dr. Feelgood. With Johnson, Dury released his last Stiff album, Laughter, which received mixed reviews but respectable sales upon its 1980 release. The following year, he signed with Polydor Records and reunited with Jankel. The pair flew to the Bahamas to record his Polydor debut with reggae superstars Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare. The resulting album, Lord Upminster, received mixed reviews and poor sales upon its 1981 release; the album was notable for the inclusion of the single "Spasticus Autisticus," a song Dury wrote for the United Nations Year of the Disabled, but was rejected.

Following the failure of Lord Upminster, Dury quietly backed away from a recording career and began to concentrate on acting; 1984's 4000 Weeks Holiday, an album recorded with his new band the Music Students, was his last major record of the '80s. He appeared in several plays and television shows, as well as the Peter Greenaway film The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover and Roman Polanski's movie Pirates. He also began to write jingles for British commercials. In 1989, he wrote the musical Apples with Mickey Gallagher, and he also appeared in the stage production of the play. Dury returned to recording in 1992 with The Bus Driver's Prayer and Other Stories.

In May 1998, Dury announced that he had been diagnosed with colon cancer in 1995 and that the disease had spread to his liver. He decided to release the information the weekend of his 56th birthday, in hopes of offering encouragement for others battling the disease. For the next year, he battled the disease while keeping a public profile -- in the fall of 1999, he was inducted into Q magazine's songwriting hall of fame, and he appeared at the ceremony. Sadly, it was his last public appearance. Dury succumbed to cancer on March 27, 2000. He left behind a truly unique, individual body of work.

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'Laughter', issued in December 1980, was Dury's third album for Stiff Records, and the only one to feature Dr. Feelgood's original (and best) guitarist, the remarkable Wilko Johnson who co-wrote the hit single 'Sueperman's Big Sister'. This Slipcased 2 CD edition includes the three non-album singles sides (including the hit 'I Want to Be Straight'), the Blockheads' demos for the album, and four outtakes from the album sessions, including the legendary 'Duff 'Em And Do 'Em Over'. The 26-page booklet inside the hardback covers features full annotation by known expert WILL BIRCH (done in 2004), lyrics to all the songs (including the stand-alone singles), publicity photos, original artwork front and rear (including photos of the “Superman’s Big Sister” single and a montage of British trade magazines like NME and Melody Maker) and so on. These are the 2004 Edsel remasters done at Alchemy Mastering and they sound amazing while all of Disc 2 was Previously Unreleased at the time.

Working with lead guitarist Wilko Johnson (Dr. Feelgood), Ian Dury gradually moves away from disco with his third album, Laughter. The steady dance pulse is still apparent, but it's balanced by rockers and pub singalongs that give the album more depth. That doesn't necessarily make it a better album, however. Dury's humor is at its most basic, as the titles of "Uncoolohol," "(Take Your Elbow out of the Soup) You're Sitting on the Chicken," "Oh Mr. Peanut," and "Fucking Ada" indicate, and his lyrics aren't quite as stunningly fluid as before. Still, the record is fun, and "Superman's Big Sister," "Yes & No (Paula)," and "Over the Points" are pretty infectious, but the record can't help but illustrate that Dury's peak period is over.

“Superman’s Big Sister” shows Dury’s knack for catchy melodies aligned with witty lyrics and wacky themes. “Delusions Of Grandeur” struggles a bit to take flight for sure - but the wickedly good “Yes & No (Paula)” would have sat comfortably on 1977’s “New Boots & Panties!!” with its Ska-Rock rhythms and scat-spoken lyrics. Fun and anger collide on “Dance Of The Crackpots” with Davey’s Payne’s great harmonica playing warbling away in the back of the mix. The band starts to finally sound slightly manic Feelgood on the acidic “Hey, Hey, Take Me Away” while “F*****g Ada” finishes the album half-laughing, half-crying with its angry chorus offset by chorus line strings.

Disc 2 features the full-blown version of “Duff ‘Em Up And Do ‘Em Over (Boogie Woogie)” (a long sought after fan fave) while the Instrumentals it has to be said feel like good backing tracks but without the lyrics – they’re a curio more than anything else.“I’m sick and tired of taking drugs and staying up late...” - our Ian sang on “I Want To Be Straight”. I never tire of Dury’s intelligence and wit and the fan/collector nerd in me is loving these gorgeous looking reissues...



Ian Dury & The Blockheads - Laughter ( 334mb)

01 Sueperman's Big Sister 2:48
02 Pardon 2:39
03 Delusions Of Grandeur 2:51
04 Yes & No (Paula) 3:06
05 Dance Of The Crackpots 2:35
06 Over The Points 4:09
07 (Take Your Elbow Out Of The Soup You're Sitting On The Chicken) 2:34
08 Uncoolohol 3:01
09 Hey, Hey, Take Me Away 2:28
10 Manic Depression (Jimi) 3:49
11 Oh Mr Peanut 3:21
12 Fucking Ada 5:59
Bonus
13 I Want To Be Straight 3:18
14 That’s Not All 2:47
15 You’ll See Glimpses 3:42

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Ian Dury & The Blockheads - Laughter Bonus   ( flac  350mb)

01 Duff ‘Em Up And Do ‘Em Over (Boogie Woogie) (Album Outtake) 3:30
02 You Are Here (Album Outtake) 3:26
03 Come In No. 9 (Album Outtake) 2:13
04 Chicken [Take Your Elbow Out Of The Soup] (Demo)  4:08
05 CC’s Rock (Demo) 2:44
06 I Know Your Name (Demo) 2:03
07 Public Party [Dance Of The Crackpots] (Demo) 3:19
08 Black And White [Yes And No (Paula)] (Demo) 3:57
09 Manic Depression (Demo) 2:52
10 More Turns For Everyone (Demo) 4:08
11 Blue Light [That’s Not All] (Demo) 2:31
12 Back To Y-Front (Demo) 3:46
13 Fatback (Demo) 3:00
14 On The Spot (Do The Block) (Demo) 4:31
15 Duff ‘Em Up And Do ‘Em Over (Boogie Woogie) [Oh Mr Peanut] (Demo) 3:16
16 Peter Gunn (Demo) 3:26

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When Ian Dury left Stiff Records, he also left the Blockheads behind, recording Lord Upminster with reggae superstars Robbie Shakespeare and Sly Dunbar as producers. with this album Ian Dury opened up to sounds closer to disco and electronic music than  It was beginning to stand out in those years.  So after finishing with stiff records, Ian Dury signed for Polydor presiding over the musician Chaz Jankel, who started his solo career, and also The Blockheads.

 So many changes in such a short space of time to his strongest followers did not like him, and Ian Dury was branded with his records outside of Stiff to want to give a more commercial turn to his music.In fact everything was more or less as in the closest tracks of the acclaimed Do It Yourself, ie new wave rhythms mixed with pop and rock, something more commercial.  Today the album is largely reminiscent of three hits that reached the highest point at the time that were Funky Disco Pops, The Body Songs, and the unmistakable Spasticus Autisticus, which made the record not be forgotten, since in it's time it was quite thumbed down. Clearly Sly & Robbie present here didn't have the status they would get in years to come and possibly there was too much smokin' going on (yah man), what ever there wasn't that click that causes the music to spark.



Ian Dury - Lord Upminster ( flac  212mb)

01 Funky Disco (Pops) 3:41
02 Red (Letter) 4:04
03 Girls (Watching) 4:37
04 Wait (For Me) 4:02
05 The (Body Song) 5:25
06 Lonely (Town) 4:33
07 Trust (Is A Must) 6:50
08 Spasticus (Autisticus) 5:19

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Originally, “4,000 Weeks' Holiday” was a 1984 album released by Ian Dury & The Music Students on Polydor Records. Its title is a reference to the length of an average human lifespan (4000 weeks). In 1984 Ian Dury was an official face for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament in Britain and went so far as to shave a peace symbol into his hair, this can be seen on the cover to the album (and the "Ban the Bomb" Single). The album's song credits and lyrics are hand written. Accompanying each song's information are strange catchphrases such as "when flies fly, flies fly behind flies", "a gaudy morning bodes a wet afternoon" and most bizarre of all "my, how we apples swim quoth the dogshit" 4,000 Weeks Holiday was not reissued on CD in the UK until 2013, but was released in that format in Japan in 2007. If accounts by Dury himself and Music Student member Merlin Rhys-Jones (who would continue to work with Dury and co-write songs with him until his death) from Sex and Drugs and Rock and Roll: The Life of Ian Dury are correct, it would appear that it was Polydor records who suggested and insisted on Dury working with young musicians. Contradictorily, Ian Dury & The Blockheads: Song By Song purports that Polydor had wanted The Blockheads to play on the album, with the group rejecting the idea after learning they wouldn't be paid due to Dury spending most of his advance on his previous solo effort Lord Upminster. Song By Song's account is corroborated by Norman-Watt Roy (bassist for the Blockheads). Both versions are questionable. (source?) Chaz Jankel, Dury's primary songwriting partner, was busy with his solo career in America and with no Blockheads present, Dury turned to his old songwriting partner from his pub rock days Russell Hardy (and another Rod Melvin it would seem), and worked with a young American songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Michael McEvoy, who had been introduced to him by Blockheads and Kilburn and the High Roads member Davey Payne after McEvoy had played on the saxophonist's solo album for Stiff Records. Adam Kidron, who had produced Payne's album, had hired McEvoy as on a number of projects (including Orange Juice's debut album and Scritti Politti's Songs to Remember) which he produced before 4000 Weeks Holiday. Rehearsals for the album began in 1982 in Hammersmith, London, not very far from Dury's current flat in luxurious Thames-side apartments, and was recorded the following year in Basing Street Studios, Notting Hill and later The Townhouse. Though Jankel did not write any of the songs, he did play lead guitar as a guest. Ed Speight and Geoff Castle, who had played on Dury's seminal New Boots and Panties!! LP in 1977, guested on guitar and Moog synthesizer. The sessions also featured an extra special guest, celebrated reggae/ska trombone player Rico Rodriguez MBE (known to UK youth from The Specials), but most of the recordings were performed by the 'Music Students', i.e. McEvoy, Rhys-Jones, drummer Tag Lamche and saxophonist Jamie Talbot. Dury was forced by Polydor to remove one of the album's stronger (and controversial) songs "Fuck off Noddy" (and another about Billy Butlin) because of high profile paedophile and child pornography cases at the time (there was also rumours of a proposed lawsuit by the estate of Enid Blyton). The song puts down children's television and contained such lines as: “Winnie The Pooh is having a wank. And what are you up too? Said Thomas the Tank” and “Fuck off Noddy you stupid prat. Fuck off Noddy in your rotten hat.” Dury was determined not to cut the song and arguments about it delayed the record's release for over half a year. The single "Really Glad You Came / (You're My) Inspiration" was released during that time, the songs were two different lyrics put to an almost identical tune (by McEvoy) and the single was a total failure (though these are the two tracks most often used on Greatest Hits compilations) and its follow up single "Ban The Bomb / Very Personal" was actually mocked by critics, the first time this had happened to Ian Dury in his career thus far. Despite heavy promotion and touring by Ian Dury & The Music Students, including a week's residency in Tel Aviv, Israel and an appearance on influential music show The Tube the album's sales were poor, though the album reached number 54 in the UK Album Charts. The album also contains a noteworthy track: "Peter the Painter" was written (with McEvoy) on request from British Pop artist Peter Blake, Blake had been Dury's teacher at London's Royal College of Art and the two remained good friends until Dury's death in 2000. Blake was having his own exhibition at The Tate Gallery, London and asked Dury to compose a theme tune for it. "Peter the Painter" was that theme tune. Ian Dury’s last LP for Polydor was, as usual, full of memorable lyrics, keenly added to a tableau of multi-faceted musical muscle – this time provided by a fine young band of musicians he dubbed the Music Students. With 4000 Weeks’…, Dury demonstrated, once again, his supremacy as champion of the written word. And you can’t help but marvel at the dexterity of his delivery. Remastered from the original tapes, this version features six bonus tracks, five of them previously unreleased, as well as 20-page booklet complete with lyrics and new sleeve notes.



Ian Dury and The Music Students - 4000 Weeks Holiday ( 477mb)

01 You're My Inspiration 4:28
02 Friends 3:16
03 Tell Your Daddy 2:57
04 Peter The Painter 4:05
05 Ban The Bomb 4:37
06 Percy The Poet 3:35
07 Very Personal 4:08
08 Take Me To The Cleaners 2:41
09 The Man With No Face 5:04
10 Really Glad You Came 4:57
Bonus
11 The Sky's The Limit 3:35
12 You're My Inspiration (Long Version) 5:19
13 Peter The Painter (Long Version) 5:03
14 I Weighed Myself Up 4:08
15 I Weighed Myself Up (Long Version) 4:50
16 Percy The Poet ( Full Version) 5:28

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Excellent live recording from 1990 from the late genius Ian Dury.  The Blockheads are the ultimate skin-tight backdrop for Dury, adding brilliance to songs like 'Wake Up And Make Love With Me', 'Clever Trevor', 'What A Waste' and 'Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick' etc. The soundquality is stunning.  If you liked "new boots" and "do it yourself", you'll enjoy the live version of some of their best pieces. Although the intro may fire up higher expectations than the concert actually deliver, and although some of the songs here are performed with higher "fun-factor" in their studio versions, this is a cd piece you MUST own if you were a blockhead fan end 70ies - (or would have liked to bee if you had been old enough). And yes, it still is a good party record a late Saturday evening (or early Sunday morning after too much Irish coffee). The album ends with an 8 min energetic version of "blockheads" -  You move with the rhythem - Not bad at all :-))



Ian Dury And The Blockheads - Warts 'N' Audience ( 438mb)

01 Intro 1:24
02 Wake Up And Make Love With Me 6:05
03 Clevor Trever 6:49
04 If I Was With A Woman 4:26
05 Billericay Dickie 3:31
06 Quiet 3:37
07 My Old Man 4:40
08 Spasticus Autisticus 5:01
09 Plaistow Patricia 4:44
10 There Ain't Half Been Some Clever Bastards 3:03
11 Sweet Gene Vincent 4:29
12 What A Waste! 3:54
13 Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick 5:40
14 Blockheads 7:36

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Apr 22, 2019

RhoDeo 1916 Kafka

Hello, last 2 weeks it was Big Brothers nightmarish admins making life miserable to mere humans, it's not inconceivable Orwell read Kafka's take the nightmares burocracies can create, and as these days the burocracies are supported by the 'infallible' computer, this kind of misery is never far away for the unsuspecting citizen....


The Castle is often understood to be about alienation, unresponsive bureaucracy, the frustration of trying to conduct business with non-transparent, seemingly arbitrary controlling systems, and the futile pursuit of an unobtainable goal.

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Franz Kafka[a] (3 July 1883 – 3 June 1924) was a German-speaking Bohemian Jewish novelist and short-story writer, widely regarded as one of the major figures of 20th-century literature. His work, which fuses elements of realism and the fantastic, typically features isolated protagonists facing bizarre or surrealistic predicaments and incomprehensible socio-bureaucratic powers, and has been interpreted as exploring themes of alienation, existential anxiety, guilt, and absurdity. His best known works include "Die Verwandlung" ("The Metamorphosis"), Der Process (The Trial), and Das Schloss (The Castle). The term Kafkaesque has entered the English language to describe situations like those found in his writing.

Kafka was born into a middle-class, German-speaking Jewish family in Prague, the capital of the Kingdom of Bohemia, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, today the capital of the Czech Republic. He trained as a lawyer, and after completing his legal education, was employed full-time by an insurance company, forcing him to relegate writing to his spare time. Over the course of his life, Kafka wrote hundreds of letters to family and close friends, including his father, with whom he had a strained and formal relationship. He became engaged to several women but never married. He died in 1924 at the age of 40 from tuberculosis.

Few of Kafka's works were published during his lifetime: the story collections Betrachtung (Contemplation) and Ein Landarzt (A Country Doctor), and individual stories (such as "Die Verwandlung") were published in literary magazines but received little public attention. In his will, Kafka instructed his executor and friend Max Brod to destroy his unfinished works, including his novels Der Process, Das Schloss and Der Verschollene (translated as both Amerika and The Man Who Disappeared), but Brod ignored these instructions. His work has influenced a vast range of writers, critics, artists, and philosophers during the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Kafka died before he could finish the novel, and it is questionable whether he intended to finish it if he had survived his tuberculosis. At one point he told his friend Max Brod that the novel would conclude with K., the book's protagonist, continuing to reside in the village until his death; the castle would notify him on his deathbed that his "legal claim to live in the village was not valid, yet, taking certain auxiliary circumstances into account, he was permitted to live and work there." However, on 11 September 1922 in a letter to Brod, he wrote he was giving up on the book and would never return to it. As it is, the book ends mid-sentence.

Although Brod was instructed by Kafka to destroy all of his unpublished works on his death, he instead set about publishing many of them. Das Schloss was originally published in German in 1926 by the publisher Joella Goodman of Munich. This edition sold far less than the 1500 copies that were printed. It was republished in 1935 by Schocken Verlag in Berlin, and in 1946 by Schocken Books of New York. Brod heavily edited the work to ready it for publication. His goal was to gain acceptance of the work and the author, not to maintain the structure of Kafka's writing. This would play heavily in the future of the translations and continues to be the center of discussion on the text. Brod donated the manuscript to Oxford University.

The title Das Schloss may be translated as "the castle" or "the palace", but the German word is a homonym that can also refer to a lock. It is also phonetically close to der Schluss ("conclusion" or "end"). The castle is locked and closed to K. and the townspeople; neither can gain access. The name of the character Klamm is similar to "Klammer" in German, which means "clip, brace, peg, fastener" and may hold a double meaning; for Klamm is essentially the lock that locks away the secrets of the Castle and the salvation of K. In ordinary usage, "klamm" is an adjective that denotes a combination of dampness and chill and can be used in reference both to weather and clothing, which inscribes a sense of unease into the main character's name. In Czech, "klam" means delusion, deceit.


Two-part BBC Dramatisation of Franz Kafka's mind-warping novel, set in a bureaucratic wonderland.

The hapless land-surveyor known only as K answers a summons to work at the mysterious Castle, only to find himself drawn into a labyrinth of terror and absurdity.

The cast included Dominic Rowan as "K.", Sammy T. Dobson as Frieda, Mark Benton as Jeremias, Daniel Weyman as Artur, Stephen Greif as Teacher, Rachel Bavidge as Gardena/Amalia, Victoria Elliott as Olga, Neil Grainger as Barnabas. Jonathan Cullen as Chief Superintendent and Dominic Deakin as Hans.



Franz Kafka - The Castle (Das Schloss) 1 ( 57min mp3     52mb).




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previously

George Orwell - Nineteen Eighty Four - Part 1 ( 57min mp3     52mb).
George Orwell - Nineteen Eighty Four - Part 2   ( 57min mp3     52mb).

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Apr 21, 2019

Sundaze 1916

Hello,


Today's artists is an English singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist best known as the lead singer of the progressive rock band Yes, which he co-founded in 1968 with bassist Chris Squire. He was a member of the band across three tenures between 1968 and 2008. He is also noted for his solo career, releasing 13 solo albums and collaborations with other artists, including Vangelis as Jon and Vangelis, Roine Stolt as Anderson/Stolt, and Jean-Luc Ponty as AndersonPonty Band. He has also appeared on albums by King Crimson, Tangerine Dream, Iron Butterfly and Mike Oldfield. He became an American citizen in 2009. In 2017, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Yes.  ...  ......N-Joy

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 Born John Roy Anderson on October 25, 1944, in Lancashire, England, Jon Anderson would grow up to become one of the most recognizable voices in progressive rock. He began his musical career by joining his brother Tony's group the Warriors. Eventually, that band relocated from England to Germany, but Tony had left the group by then. So, the only Anderson still in the band by 1965 when they cut their first single was Jon (technically still John at that time). The single received a less than enthusiastic welcome and Anderson left the group in 1967, having put in five years with them. His next move was to the group the Party, but that one was quite short-lived. By 1968, Anderson had returned to England and recorded two singles under the moniker Hans Christian Anderson. Those received responses similar to what the Warriors' single had. Anderson found his way into the group Gun, but only stayed there for a couple of months.

The year was 1968 and musical history was about to be made with an introduction in a London club. Jon Anderson was introduced to Chris Squire, and finding a kindred spirit in music, he began showing up at gigs of Squire's band Mabel Greer's Toy Shop, whose guitarist at the time was Peter Banks. Anderson started getting up and singing with the group from time to time, eventually becoming their vocalist. However, Banks had left by the time Anderson was inducted. More pieces gradually began to fall into the mix as various musicians were brought into the Toy Shop fold. First Bill Bruford, then Tony Kaye. By the time Peter Banks returned, the band had decided to change their name to Yes. They released their first two albums in 1969 and 1970, and both received good critical response, but didn't gain a large commercial or radio presence. By the time that they recorded 1970's The Yes Album, the band had replaced Peter Banks with Steve Howe and the combination, along with a stroke of luck at a U.S. radio station, proved the charm that started their commercial career. Interestingly, Anderson found the time for side projects even amidst recording and touring with Yes. In fact, he would show up on two albums in the first two years of the decade. The first was King Crimson's Lizard and the other was Johnny Harris' All to Bring You Morning. The next Yes album, 1972's Fragile, would feature both the debut of new keyboardist Rick Wakeman and the single "Roundabout." The combination propelled the group and Anderson well into the spotlight. For the next couple of years, Yes occupied the majority of Anderson's time. With the recording of three more studio albums before 1974 and steady touring, he would have little time for much else. However, after the tour for Relayer, things began to settle down a bit. Anderson managed to work with Vangelis Papathanassiou, who had been Yes' first choice for Rick Wakeman's replacement. Although immigration issues forced the band to go with Patrick Moraz instead, Anderson added vocals to the keyboardist's Heaven and Hell album released in 1975. It would definitely not be the last time they would work together.

1976 saw the entire band taking time to record solo albums. Anderson's outing, Olias of Sunhillow, was an ambitious creation. It was an album-long concept piece with nearly all the writing and performances being undertaken by the singer himself. He also added vocals to Yes drummer Alan White's Ramshackled album. The break seemed to revitalize the band and their next release, Going for the One, featuring the return of Rick Wakeman, was a very strong album and ushered the band into 1977 with style. Anderson's role in the group was close to coming to an end for a time, though. He stuck with them through the next album and couple of tours, but when they began recording for the follow up to Tormato, the dreaded "musical differences" cropped up and Anderson left. He definitely did not become idle, though. Indeed, the next couple of years proved very fertile for him. He released his second solo album, Song of Seven, in 1980. That same year, he collaborated again with Papathanassiou. This time they recorded an entire album together and released it under the moniker Jon & Vangelis. The album was called Short Stories, and they enjoyed that work so much that before the end of 1981, they released two more albums together. 1981 also saw Anderson appearing on Rick Wakeman's 1984 album. His next solo release was 1982's Animation, a show he took on the road.

1983 would be another turning point for Anderson. He worked on Mike Oldfield's Crises album, but that would not be the decisive factor in his career. By that time, Yes had been broken up for almost three years. Chris Squire and Alan White were working with a young guitarist named Trevor Rabin on a project called Cinema. Tony Kaye had also been enlisted for the project. Producer and one-time Anderson Yes replacement Trevor Horn suggested that Anderson should add some vocals to the project. Upon agreeing. Anderson remarked that with his voice on the songs it would be Yes. The group agreed and the name Cinema was dropped in favor of Yes. The resulting album, 90125, propelled by the hit single "Owner of a Lonely Heart," saw the band receive more success than they had ever previously attained. A tour ensued, but then the band had some quiet time. Anderson took the opportunity to record another solo album, this time a collection of holiday songs, entitled Three Ships. He also managed to work on a few other projects including movie soundtracks with John Paul Jones and Tangerine Dream. The next Yes album and tour in 1987 saw those musical differences once again appearing and Anderson again left Yes.

In the time following his second departure from the group, he released another solo album, this one a rather poppy collection entitled In the City of Angels. He also guested on Toto's release The Seventh One. By that time, he had begun talking with several Yes alumni about working together again. The group of them, Anderson, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, and Bill Bruford were joined by Tony Levin and completed an album. The only problem was deciding what to call the group. They had wanted to name it Yes, but Chris Squire proved ownership of that name and was not going to let them use it. So, they chose to forego cleverness and work with their last names. Thus their album was a self-titled one called Anderson- Bruford-Wakeman-Howe. The group toured fairly extensively for the release, but Anderson still wound up finding the time to contribute vocals to Jonathan Elias' Requiem for the Americas album. Another odd turn of events was looming on the horizon, though. As Anderson-Bruford-Wakeman-Howe were working on their second release, Yes was in the process of recording their next album. Lines of communication were once again opened and both projects were combined into one Yes album, dubbed Union. The group toured for the album to both filled stadiums and rave reviews. Anderson still found time to get together with Papathanassiou again and release the next Jon & Vangelis album, Page of Life, in 1991. The following year, he worked on Kitaro's album Dream. Among other projects, Anderson would do another album with Papathanassiou (Chronicles) and two solo albums (Deseo and Change We Must) before the 1994 release of the next Yes album, Talk. The lineup on that disc was back to a five-piece, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, and Bill Bruford having gone their separate ways.

The next couple of years were quiet ones for Yes, but not for Anderson. He made guest appearances on a few projects and released two new solo albums. And big things were once again on the horizon for Yes. It was announced in late 1995 that Trevor Rabin and Tony Kaye were no longer part of the group. They were replaced by alums Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman. A classic Yes lineup and incredible fan enthusiasm surrounded both the band and Anderson. The group did three shows in San Luis Obispo in March of 1996. The shows were recorded and released along with new studio material as the two Keys to Ascension albums. 1997 saw quite a bit more activity from Anderson. He released two solo albums, the Celtic The Promise Ring and EarthMotherEarth. Yes also released an album featuring his vocals. The disc was called Open Your Eyes and in true Yes tradition of revolving door membership, it did not feature Rick Wakeman, who had already left. Anderson went along with the group on a tour of small intimate theaters that fall. In 1998, he released his next solo album, The More You Know. That same year saw several releases featuring his vocal talents. Among them was 4Him's album Streams, Yes' The Ladder, and Steve Howe's Portraits of Bob Dylan. Touring and working on the Yes album Magnification have kept Anderson pretty busy, but he found time to appear on Béla Fleck & the Flecktones' 2000 release Outbound.

Anderson toured off and on with Yes until 2008 when he left due to health concerns. He re-emerged in 2011 with the solo album Survival and Other Stories and The Living Tree in collaboration with Wakeman. In 2012, he began collaborating with violinist Jean Luc Ponty, resulting in the Anderson Ponty Band's Better Late Than Never, comprised mostly of new readings of Yes material. A year earlier, at the instigation of InsideOut Music label boss Thomas Waber, Anderson began working with Flower Kings /Transatlantic guitarist Roine Stolt. They were asked to consider recording a series of suite-like tunes that would echo what Yes accomplished on Tales from Topographic Oceans and Anderson's own Olias of Sunhillow, albeit with a modern prog bent. After trading ideas back and forth on the internet for months, live sessions were initiated in March of 2015 with a full band and backing vocalists. Invention of Knowledge, billed to Anderson/Stolt, consisted of four long tracks. It was released by Inside/Out in June of 2016.



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 Jon Anderson joins conductor Nigel Warren-Green and his London Chamber Academy for orchestral arrangements of new material and old favorites on Change We Must (and that sound you hear in the distance is the small army of Anderson's detractors crying "This time he's really gone too far"). But far from being the exercise in self-indulgence that some would charge, Change We Must proves to be a lovely setting for Anderson's compositions. Expertly produced by the vocalist and Tim Handley, the album finds Anderson's voice in harmonic balance with a wonderful landscape of orchestral sounds. The combined effect is, in a word, lovely. Beginning with the Jon & Vangelis chestnut "State of Independence," the singer and orchestra achieve a natural beauty that the previous pairing aimed at but rarely captured. Likewise, "Hurry Home" and "Under the Sun" -- both of which originally appeared on In the City of Angels (the latter as "It's on Fire") -- are given a second life with Celtic and Third World arrangements, respectively. Some of the new material -- such as the "Chagall Duet," with soprano Sandrine Piau, or "Candle Song," with daughter Jade -- offer a double dose of sweetness, while other songs (notably John Adams' adaptation "Shaker Loops") are intentionally edgy. Anderson even steps out of the spotlight for a trio of piano-led instrumentals co-written with David Tolley and featuring pianist Gwendolyn Mok. These serve as a spirited interlude between songs and represent a unique departure from Anderson's often-elusive arrangements. For nostalgists, who might regard the lack of anything from Olias of Sunhillow as a missed opportunity, the Yes song "Hearts" is given a faithful but welcome reading. The title track serves as a fitting finale, with flawless production and otherwordly arrangements transporting the listener to Anderson's own plane of consciousness. Dedicated to spiritualist Nana Veary, Change We Must speaks in a multitude of musical tongues -- classical, rock, Third World, choral -- with beauty as its common thread.



Jon Anderson - Change We Must ( 282mb)

01 Ocean Song 3:04
02 Meeting (Garden Of Geda) / Sound Out The Galleon 3:34
03 Dance Of Ranyart / Olias (To Build The Moorglade) 4:19
04 Qoquaq Ën Transic / Naon / Transic Tö 7:08
05 Flight Of The Moorglade 3:24
06 Solid Space 5:20
07 Moon Ra / Chords / Song Of Search 12:48
08 To The Runner 4:29

Jon Anderson - Change We Must (ogg  120mb)

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Jon Anderson's voice immersed in South American music might seem an unlikely match, but the rich and vibrant tones of Deseo (meaning desire or wish) provide a strikingly fresh setting for the singer. Augmented by well-known artists from across South and Latin America, the Yes vocalist seems content to recede into the background on many of the tracks, retaining a native flavor with stellar cameos from Maria Conchita Alonso, Boca Livre, Milton Nascimento, and many others. The songs, which generally clock in around three-and-a-half minutes, are warm and upbeat, mixing English, Portuguese, and Spanish vocals with propulsive percussion, acoustic guitars, bass, and synthesizers. The melodies are lovely and atmospheric, uncomplicated but evocative. The best tracks don't necessarily feature Anderson in a starring role: "A-DE-O," "Bridges," "Danca Do Ouro," and "Café" feature the vocalist in a supporting role, but listeners may find themselves too entranced by the beautiful harmonies to notice his absence. While the singer does take center stage on a number of songs with pleasant results -- "This Child," "Floresta," and especially "Bless This" (with Deborah Anderson) -- a few tracks leave Anderson exposed, notably the lightweight "Latino" and the ill-advised posturing of the opening "Amor Real." However, these occasional missteps are easily overlooked in lieu of the disc's innumerable charms. The artist had experimented with world sounds on earlier albums with his Yes mates -- "Teakbois" from Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe and "Angkor Wat" from Union come to mind -- but Deseo marks a genuine willingness to step outside of his own idiom. Thus, the connection between Jon Anderson and the music on Deseo isn't always clear, but the singer wisely shares his sense of discovery with the listener, allowing the music (and not the musician) to shine.



Jon Anderson - Deseo (flac  226mb)

01 Curious Electric 6:34
02 Each And Everyday 3:41
03 Bird Song 1:22
04 I Hear You Now 5:09
05 The Road 4:29
06 Far Away In Baagad 2:49
07 Love Is 5:09
08 One More Time 6:12
09 Thunder 2:10
10 A Play Within A Play 7:01

  (ogg   mb)

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While many Jon Anderson fans knew he had it in him to do something very light and airy and perhaps even without vocals (Olias of Sunhillow essentially led the way), the fact that it's something this light and airy is likely to come as a bit of a shock. Anderson presents the listener with a soundscape made up of long, sustained notes and drifting chords, a construction in which the few melodies present take minutes to work through -- there's far more in common with the Hearts of Space catalog here than with much of Anderson's prior work, though the Vangelis influence is to be felt, too (especially on the quarter-hour "New Eire Land"). Another surprise is the mainly instrumental nature of the album -- Anderson takes very few vocals. Daughters Deborah and Jade pitch in along the way without much incident. On the whole, Angels Embrace sounds something like a lost Jon & Vangelis album, or Brian Eno in a frothy mood, and just like good background music for meditation, spiritual navel-gazing, and general situations where the alpha waves need a decent boost.



Jon Anderson - Angels Embrace   ( 301mb)

01 For You For Me 4:24
02 Some Are Born 4:02
03 Don't Forget (Nostalgia) 2:57
04 Heart Of The Matter 4:18
05 Hear It 1:48
06 Everybody Loves You 4:01
07 Take Your Time 3:12
08 Days 3:24
09 Song Of Seven 11:07

Jon Anderson - Angels Embrace   (ogg  116mb)

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A concept album, Anderson's Toltec is made up of 13 cuts divided into three parts. It tells the tale of the Toltec, a Native American concept of a group of people who have been all over the Earth, existing within different cultures throughout the centuries. They are described in the liner as "Creators of the circles of power, color, perfume, and music healing domes." Musically, this one is arguably Anderson's most ambitious solo effort. It is set in a style that is definitely progressive rock, but focuses less on the rock and more on other elements. Among those elements are new age (no surprise as the albumwas released on the Windham Hill label), world music, electronic, and even jazz. Anderson not only provided the expected vocals, but also wrote, arranged, and produced the disc. The result is an album that should appeal not just to fans of the singer, but to those into progressive rock in general as well. It definitely isn't Yes (although it does share some elements with their work), but it is certainly an intriguing and entertaining work.



Jon Anderson - Toltec ( 272mb)

01 Italian Song 2:52
02 And When The Night Comes 4:34
03 Deborah 4:53
04 Polonaise 5:23
05 He Is Sailing 6:46
06 Horizon 22:51

Jon Anderson - Toltec (ogg  110mb)

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Back in the day Jon 'discovered' Vangelis and their partnership did both a world of good, 2 decades later Vangelis' fire had deminished so Jon's idea to throw his latest album as a bone to a new crop of ambient stars, that surprisingly all understood it could lift them out of the relative anonimity, that with hindsight didn't happen but still, nice ambient remixing to say the least from true ambient giants, Future Sound of London, Global Communication, Deep Forest and Trans Global Underground.  This album journeys between pulsing ambient to drippy trips in the sunny jungles of you mind with the former sing of Yes' vocals sound a whole lot better here than anywhere else.   Vibrant and exotic. Expansive. Gets in there and writhes. It's a superb and unique recording. Cerebrally stimulating. Brings you up and lets you go...you'll love it. Essential album for fans of the remixers, and for those looking for something new, too bad that it remains largely obscure. The Deep Forest and Global Communication tracks are the highlights.



Jon Anderson - The Deseo Remixes ( 370mb)

01 Hold On To Love 4:47
02 If It Wasn't For Love (Oneness Family) 4:25
03 Sundancing (For The Hopi / Navajo Energy) 3:17
04 Is It Me 4:24
05 In A Lifetime 4:15
06 For You 2:57
07 New Civilization 4:32
08 It's On Fire 4:10
09 Betcha 4:00
10 Top Of The World (The Glass Bead Game) 5:25
11 Hurry Home (Song From The Pleiades) 5:03

Jon Anderson - The Deseo Remixes (ogg  138mb)

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