Sep 10, 2019

RhoDeo 1936 Magic 2

Hello, It’s one the great enduring mysteries of solar physics — why is the sun’s lower corona hundreds of times hotter than the Sun’s photosphere? For many decades, scientists on Earth have sought an answer to the puzzle, though doing so exclusively within the confines of the standard model of the Sun.

Recently, a team of scientists reported observational evidence that the mysterious rise in temperature could be driven by so-called “magnetic plasma pulses.” Of course, like all scientific data, both what scientists are looking for and how they interpret what they see is determined by their theoretical premises. In this episode, we asked Dr. Scott for a comprehensive overview of the Electric Sun model’s explanation for the mystery of coronal heating.




Solving the Mystery of Coronal Heating (19min)






Most people just accept that our universe is ruled by gravity; an assumption that is wrong. Evidence instead shows that the force responsible for all of the objects and events we observe throughout the universe is the electric force that enables current flow and therefore magnetic fields to exist. If we consider that the electric force is fundamentally one thousand, billion, billion, billion, billion times more powerful than gravity and that the universe consists of 99.99% plasma; charged matter through which electric currents flow, then you have good reason to open your mind and watch what this video has to say.

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Today, the 2nd part of the first Disc-world tale The Colour of Magic..... N-Joy

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Sir Terence David John Pratchett OBE (28 April 1948 – 12 March 2015) was an English author of fantasy novels, especially comical works. He is best known for his Discworld series of 41 novels.

Pratchett's first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971. The first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983, after which Pratchett wrote an average of two books a year. His 2011 Discworld novel Snuff became the third-fastest-selling hardback adult-readership novel since records began in the UK, selling 55,000 copies in the first three days. The final Discworld novel, The Shepherd's Crown, was published in August 2015, five months after his death.

Pratchett, with more than 85 million books sold worldwide in 37 languages, was the UK's best-selling author of the 1990s. He was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1998 and was knighted for services to literature in the 2009 New Year Honours. In 2001 he won the annual Carnegie Medal for The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, the first Discworld book marketed for children. He received the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2010.

In December 2007, Pratchett announced that he had been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. He later made a substantial public donation to the Alzheimer's Research Trust (now Alzheimer's Research UK), filmed a television programme chronicling his experiences with the condition for the BBC, and became a patron for Alzheimer's Research UK. Pratchett died on 12 March 2015, aged 66.


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Discworld is a comic fantasy book series written by the English author Terry Pratchett, set on the Discworld, a flat planet balanced on the backs of four elephants which in turn stand on the back of a giant turtle. The books frequently parody or take inspiration from J. R. R. Tolkien, Robert E. Howard, H. P. Lovecraft, Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare, as well as mythology, folklore and fairy tales, often using them for satirical parallels with cultural, political and scientific issues.

Forty-one Discworld novels have been published. The original British editions of the first 26 novels, up to Thief of Time (2001), had cover art by Josh Kirby. The American editions, published by Harper Collins, used their own cover art. Since Kirby's death in 2001, the covers have been designed by Paul Kidby. Companion publications include eleven short stories (some only loosely related to the Discworld), four popular science books, and a number of supplementary books and reference guides. The series has been adapted for graphic novels, theatre, computer and board games, and television.

Newly released Discworld books regularly topped The Sunday Times best-sellers list, making Pratchett the UK's best-selling author in the 1990s. Discworld novels have also won awards such as the Prometheus Award and the Carnegie Medal. In the BBC's Big Read, four Discworld novels were in the top 100, and a total of fourteen in the top 200. More than 80 million Discworld books have been sold in 37 languages

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The Discworld novels contain common themes and motifs that run through the series. Fantasy clichés are parodied in many of the novels, as are various subgenres of fantasy, such as fairy tales (notably Witches Abroad), witch and vampire stories (Carpe Jugulum) and so on. Analogies of real-world issues, such as religion (Small Gods), fundamentalism and inner city tension (Thud), business and politics (Making Money), racial prejudice and exploitation (Snuff) are recurring themes, as are aspects of culture and entertainment, such as opera (Maskerade), rock music (Soul Music), cinema (Moving Pictures), and football (Unseen Academicals). Parodies of non-Discworld fiction also occur frequently, including Shakespeare, Beatrix Potter, and several movies. Major historical events, especially battles, are sometimes used as the basis for both trivial and key events in Discworld stories (Jingo, Pyramids), as are trends in science, technology, pop culture and modern art (Moving Pictures, Men at Arms, Thud). There are also humanist themes in many of the Discworld novels, and a focus on critical thinking skills in the Witches and Tiffany Aching series.

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Setting

The story takes place on the Discworld, a planet-sized flat disc carried through space on the backs of four gargantuan elephants – Berilia, Tubul, Great T'Phon and Jerakeen – who themselves stand on the shell of Great A'Tuin, a gigantic sea turtle. The surface of the disc contains oceans and continents, and with them, civilizations, cities, forests and mountains.

Synopsis The Colour of Magic

The story begins in Ankh-Morpork, the biggest city on the Discworld. The main character is an incompetent and cynical wizard named Rincewind, who is hired as a guide to the rich but naive Twoflower, an insurance clerk from the Agatean Empire who has come to visit Ankh-Morpork. Initially attempting to flee with his advance payment, Rincewind is captured by the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, who forces him to protect Twoflower, lest the tourist's death provoke the Agatean Emperor into invading Ankh-Morpork. After Twoflower is kidnapped by a gang of thieves and taken to the Broken Drum Pub, Rincewind stages a rescue alongside the Luggage, an indestructible, enchanted and sentient chest belonging to Twoflower. Before this, Twoflower convinces the Drum's barman to take out a fire insurance policy; the barman subsequently attempts to burn down the Drum to claim the money, but ends up causing a fire that destroys the whole of Ankh-Morpork. Rincewind and Twoflower escape in the chaos.

Rincewind and Twoflower travel towards the city of Quirm, unaware that their adventures on this journey are actually the subject of a boardgame played by the Gods of the Discworld. The pair are separated when they are attacked by a mountain troll summoned by Offler the Crocodile God. The ignorant Twoflower ends up being led to the Temple of Bel-Shamharoth, a being said to be the opposite of both good and evil, while Rincewind ends up imprisoned in a dryad-inhabited tree in the woods, where he watches the events in Bel Shamharoth's temple through a magical portal. The pair are reunited when Rincewind escapes into the temple through the portal, and they encounter Hrun the Barbarian, a parody of heroes in the Swords and Sorcery genre. The trio are attacked and nearly killed by Bel-Shamharoth, but escape when Rincewind accidentally blinds the creature with Twoflower's magical picture box. Hrun agrees to travel with and protect Twoflower and Rincewind in exchange for heroic pictures of him from the picture box.

The trio visit the Wyrmberg, an upside-down mountain which is home to dragon-riders who summon their dragons by imagining them, and are separated when the riders attack them. Rincewind escapes capture but is forced by Kring, Hrun's sentient magical sword, to attempt to rescue his friends. Twoflower is imprisoned within the Wyrmberg, and because of his fascination with dragons, is able to summon one greater than those of the Wyrmberg riders, who he names Ninereeds, allowing him to escape captivity and save Rincewind from being killed in a duel with one of the three heirs of the Wyrmburg. Twoflower, Rincewind and Ninereeds snatch Hrun, but as they attempt to escape into the skies, Twoflower passes out from the lack of oxygen, causing Ninereeds to disappear. Hrun is saved by Liessa, but Rincewind and Twoflower find themselves falling to their deaths. In desperation, Rincewind manages to use the Wyrmberg's power to temporarily summon a passenger jet from the real world, before he and Twoflower fall into the ocean.

The two of them are taken to the edge of the Discworld by the ocean currents and nearly carried over, but they are caught by the Circumfence, a huge net built by the nation of Krull to catch sea life and flotsam washed in from the rest of the Discworld. They are rescued by Tethis the sea troll, a being composed of water who had fallen off the edge of his own world and onto the Discworld, where he was subsequently enslaved by the Krullians. Rincewind and Twoflower are then taken by the Krullians to their capital, where they learn that the Krullians intend to discover the sex of Great A'Tuin by launching a space capsule over the edge of the Disc, and plan to sacrifice Rincewind and Twoflower to get the god Fate to smile on the voyage, Fate insisting on their sacrifice after they caused him to lose the earlier game. Rincewind and Twoflower attempt to escape, but end up stealing the capsule, which is launched with Twoflower inside, the tourist wishing to see the other worlds of the universe. Rincewind is unable to get into the capsule in time, and falls off the Disc alongside it, the Luggage following them soon after.

The story segues into the beginning of The Light Fantastic; the two books can therefore be seen as one two-volume novel.


Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 2 ( 69min mp3     38mb).


01-14 The Colour of Magic 2  70min



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previously

Terry Pratchett - The Colour of Magic part 1 ( 69min mp3     38mb).


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1 comment:

Anonymous said...

"Most people just accept that our universe is ruled by gravity; an assumption that is wrong. Evidence instead shows that the force responsible for all of the objects and events we observe throughout the universe is the electric force that enables current flow and therefore magnetic fields to exist. If we consider that the electric force is fundamentally one thousand, billion, billion, billion, billion times more powerful than gravity and that the universe consists of 99.99% plasma; charged matter through which electric currents flow, then you have good reason to open your mind and watch what this video has to say."

Let's dismantle all this.
"Most people just accept that our universe is ruled by gravity;"
I'm sorry to say, but as a physician, such an idea was never given the fore. Of course, gravity, as it is understood currently, is playing a role, but certainly as no prominent as you think it is. Gravity is a force among others, when it comes to stars, for example, sub-atomical/nuclear forces are prevalent to explain their behaviour.

"an assumption that is wrong."
The problem being that YOUR assumption is wrong!

"Evidence instead shows that the force responsible for all of the objects and events we observe throughout the universe is the electric force"
FFS, what evidence? It these guys have any evidence for such a theory, Nature front pages would be filled with them. And all physicits around the world would be gobsmaked by this.
I'd like to add that, during my courses, I somehow remember that with the wake of the electromagntic discoveries, some people thought that such forces could explain the gravity phenomenom. The most brilliant minds of the era investigated that possibility, but got nowhere. (This may explain why people like Nicholas Tesla supported the idea at the time - but he was wrong.)

"the electric force that enables current flow and therefore magnetic fields to exist."
It simply doesn't make sense. That sentence doesn't make sense, I just can repeat it

"If we consider that the electric force is fundamentally one thousand, billion, billion, billion, billion times more powerful than gravity"
This is simply not true. If I remember well, gravity is something of 10^-13 (I may be wrong but you got the idea), nothing to do with what you are claiming.

"and that the universe consists of 99.99% plasma".
I have no idea of what you call "plasma". As a physicist, I know what is the definition of plasma, and it has absolutely no relation with what you're talking about.

"charged matter through which electric currents flow, then you have good reason to open your mind and watch what this video has to say."
A part of matter looks charged, another is not (how do you apply your newly theory of electric current flows to neutral sub-atomic particles is for everyone to guess, I wonder.

As all physicists, I have my mind open, but only for things that make sense, and are useful.

Oh, and one last word, if you're interested in physics appliable to the Universe, try to get interest in thermodynamics.