Aug 31, 2015

RhoDeo 1535 Quest 05

Hello,  last week a dutchman was close to win the first real stage of the Vuelta Tom Dumoulin just has too much to cary along (as a top timetrialist) compared to a columbian climber but great returmn to the limelight after crashing out of the Toiur. Today he amazed the cycle world by attacking on a steep climb, getting hoaled back by Froome and Rodriguez in the final kilometer, thought of Dafne and passed Rodriguez and Froome, won himself the stage and the red leaders jersey as the columbian that had manifested so strongly in the week before lost 1 minute to him today. Tom still isn't a favorite to win the Vuelta though, as a mega climbing stage in Andorra is coming up wednesday, then again who knows... .



Today a series that will be running into the new year, 24 episodes of Elvenquest. It's is a sitcom about a misanthropic writer of fantasy novels who finds himself whisked away into a parallel universe by an elf, a dwarf and a warrior princess, where he must undertake to find the Sword of Asnagar in order to save Lower Earth from the evil Lord Darkness before he can get home.

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Plot

During the Third Age of Elven Princes of Lower Earth, a band of noble warriors – Vidar the Elf Lord (Boyd), Penthiselea the Warrior Princess (Winkleman) and Dean the Dwarf (Eldon) – plan to save Lower Earth from the evil rule of Lord Darkness by searching for the Sword of Asnagar, "for whoso'er wields the sword shall rule all of Lower Earth."[2] However, they first have to discover "The Chosen One" who will lead them to the Sword, whose name is "Amis". Amis is a dog belonging to Sam Porter, a misanthropic fantasy novelist in the real world.

Vidar, Penthiselea and Dean travel via a portal to take Amis, who is with Sam at a book signing in Totnes High Street, to Lower Earth. When they take Amis, Sam follows them and both Sam and Amis arrive in Lower Earth. When they arrive in Lower Earth, Amis is transformed into a human (played by Lamb), retaining many of his canine traits, such as becoming excited when there is a knock at the door, and being totally devoted to Sam. Sam believes he has been kidnapped by deranged fans until he sees the world outside the room in which he awakes. He asks to be sent back home, but is told that the portal is closed and can only be opened by the same Sword of Asnagar that Amis must seek.

Sam decides to travel with Amis, Vidar, Penthiselea and Dean to find the Sword. Meanwhile, Lord Darkness (Alistair McGowan) is planning to stop them from finding the Sword, helped by his evil but dimwitted assistant Kreech (also played by Eldon). Sam proves invaluable in using his modern instincts to trick his way past various creatures barring their way. For instance, he bluffs a three-headed troll guardian of Darkness' fortress in the same way as he would a security guard at a nightclub, distracting it long enough for Dean the dwarf to attack. He also tends to expect secret tunnels and concealed doors because that's the sort of thing he would have written into one of his plots. He is often right.




Characters

Sam Porter (Stephen Mangan). An author of fantasy novels with a jaded attitude, especially towards his more fanatical fans. As the series opens his career and personal life are not going well.

Amis, the Chosen One (Dave Lamb). Originally Sam's pet dog and best friend in the world, he transforms into a human in Lower Earth but retains canine traits and behaviours.

Vidar the Elf Lord, (Darren Boyd), last of a mighty family of Elf Lords, and the leader of the Questers, despite being somewhat dim. His name may be inspired by Víðarr, a god in Norse mythology associated with vengeance.

Penthiselea the Warrior Princess (Sophie Winkleman Series 1-3) (Ingrid Oliver Series 4) in silver breastplate armour and thigh-high boots, who has been promised to Vidar since childhood. Sam is very interested in her, but having been raised as a Warrior Princess she has no concept of relationships with men. Her name may be inspired by Penthesilea, a legendary Amazon warrior-queen.

Dean the Dwarf (Kevin Eldon), a mighty if diminutive warrior with unsavoury personal habits.

Lord Darkness (Alistair McGowan), Lord of Evil, whose efforts to dominate Lower Earth are frustrated by the Questers and his own staff of extremely dimwitted minions.

Kreech (Kevin Eldon), the Right Hand of Darkness, and only slightly less dimwitted than the other minions.

Other characters played by Chris Pavlo.



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Elvenquest 05 The Oracle Of Fenrog (mp3  25mb)

05 The Oracle Of Fenrog 28:04


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previously

Elven Quest 01 The Chosen One (mp3  25mb)
Elvenquest 02 The Search For Amis (mp3  25mb)
Elvenquest 03 The Tower Of Tests (mp3  25mb)
Elvenquest 04 The Distress Call (mp3  25mb)


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Aug 30, 2015

Sundaze 1535

Hello,

Today the 7th and final post from that Japanese musician, activist, composer, record producer, writer, singer, pianist, and actor based in Tokyo and New York. Gaining major success in 1978 as a member of the electronic music group Yellow Magic Orchestra, Sakamoto served on keyboards and sometimes vocals. He concurrently pursued a solo career, if ever anyone painted pictures with sound, Ryuichi Sakamoto supercedes them all. His instrument is the piano and i thought it fitting to finish the series with him playing the piano...... N'joy

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Sakamoto entered the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music in 1970, earning a B.A. in music composition and an M.A. with special emphasis on both electronic and ethnic music. He studied ethnomusicology there with the intention of becoming a researcher in the field, due to his interest in various world music traditions, particularly the Japanese (especially Okinawan), Indian and African musical traditions. He was also trained in classical music and began experimenting with the electronic music equipment available at the university, including synthesizers such as the Buchla, Moog, and ARP. One of Sakamoto's classical influences was Claude Debussy, who he described as his "hero" and stated that “Asian music heavily influenced Debussy, and Debussy heavily influenced me. So, the music goes around the world and comes full circle.”

After working as a session musician with Haruomi Hosono and Yukihiro Takahashi in 1977, the trio formed the internationally successful electronic music band Yellow Magic Orchestra (YMO) in 1978. Known for their seminal influence on electronic music, The group's work has had a lasting influence across genres, ranging from hip hop and techno to acid house and general melodic music. Sakamoto was the songwriter and composer for a number of the band's hit songs—including "Yellow Magic (Tong Poo)" (1978), "Technopolis" (1979), "Nice Age" (1980), "Ongaku" (1983) and "You've Got to Help Yourself" (1983). He also sang on several songs, such as "Kimi ni Mune Kyun" (1983). .

Sakamoto released his first solo album Thousand Knives of Ryūichi Sakamoto in mid-1978 with the help of Hideki Matsutake—Hosono also contributed to the song "Thousand Knives". The album experimented with different styles, such as "Thousand Knives" and "The End of Asia"—in which electronic music was fused with traditional Japanese music—while "Grasshoppers" is a more minimalistic piano song. The album was recorded from April to July 1978 with a variety of electronic musical instruments, including various synthesizers, such as the KORG PS-3100, a polyphonic synthesizer; the Oberheim Eight-Voice; the Moog III-C; the Polymoog, the Minimoog; the Micromoog; the Korg VC-10, which is a vocoder; the KORG SQ-10, which is an analog sequencer; the Syn-Drums, an electronic drum kit; and the microprocessor-based Roland MC-8 Microcomposer, which is a music sequencer that was programmed by Matsutake and played by Sakamoto.

In 1980 Sakamoto released the solo album B-2 Unit, which has been referred to as his "edgiest" record and is known for the electronic
song "Riot in Lagos", which is considered an early example of electro music (electro-funk).The 1980 release of "Riot in Lagos" was listed by The Guardian in 2011 as one of the 50 key events in the history of dance music. Also in 1980, Sakamoto released the single "War Head/Lexington Queen", an experimental synthpop and electro record, and began a long-standing collaboration with David Sylvian, when he co-wrote and performed on the Japan track "Taking Islands In Africa". In 1982, Sakamoto worked on another collaboration with Sylvian, a single entitled "Bamboo Houses/Bamboo Music".

Sakamoto released a number of solo albums during the 1980s. While primarily focused on the piano and synthesizer, this series of albums included collaborations with artists such as Sylvian, David Byrne, Thomas Dolby, Nam June Paik and Iggy Pop. Sakamoto would alternate between exploring a variety of musical styles, ideas and genres—captured most notably in his 1983 album Illustrated Musical Encyclopedia—and focusing on a specific subject or theme, such as the Italian Futurism movement in Futurista (1986). As his solo career began to extend outside Japan in the late 1980s, Sakamoto's explorations, influences and collaborators also developed further. Beauty (1989) features a tracklist that combines pop with traditional Japanese and Okinawan songs, as well as guest appearances by Jill Jones, Robert Wyatt, Brian Wilson and Robbie Robertson. Heartbeat (1991) and Sweet Revenge (1994) features Sakamoto's collaborations with a global range of artists.

In 1995 Sakamoto released Smoochy, described by the Sound On Sound website as Sakamoto's "excursion into the land of easy-listening and Latin", followed by the 1996 album, which featured a number of previously released pieces arranged for solo piano, violin and cello. During the December of 1996 Sakamoto, composed the entirety of an hour-long orchestral work entitled "Untitled 01" and released as the album Discord (1998). the recording was condensed from nine live performances of the work, recorded during a Japanese tour. Discord was divided into four parts: "Grief", "Anger", "Prayer" and "Salvation"; Sakamoto explained in 1998 that he was "not religious, but maybe spiritual" and "The Prayer is to anybody or anything you want to name." . Sakamoto's next album, BTTB (1998)—an acronym for "Back to the Basics"—was a fairly opaque reaction to the prior year's multilayered, lushly orchestrated Discord. The album comprised a series of original pieces on solo piano, including "Energy Flow" (a major hit in Japan) and a frenetic, four-hand arrangement of the Yellow Magic Orchestra classic "Tong Poo".

1999 saw the long-awaited release of Sakamoto's "opera" LIFE. It premiered with seven sold-out performances in Tokyo and Osaka. This ambitious multi-genre multi-media project featured contributions by over 100 performers, including Pina Bausch, Bernardo Bertolucci, Josep Carreras, His Holiness The Dalai Lama and Salman Rushdie. Sakamoto teamed with cellist Jaques Morelenbaum (a member of his 1996 trio), and Morelenbaum's wife, Paula, on a pair of albums celebrating the work of bossa nova pioneer Antonio Carlos Jobim. They recorded their first album, Casa (2001).

Sakamoto collaborated with Alva Noto (an alias of Carsten Nicolai) to release Vrioon, an album of Sakamoto's piano clusters treated by Nicolai's unique style of digital manipulation, involving the creation of "micro-loops" and minimal percussion. The two produced this work by passing the pieces back and forth until both were satisfied with the result. This debut, released on German label Raster-Noton, was voted record of the year 2004 in the electronica category by British magazine The Wire. They then released Insen (2005) – while produced in a similar manner to Vrioon, this album is somewhat more restrained and minimalist.

In 2005, Finnish mobile phone manufacturer Nokia hired Sakamoto to compose ring and alert tones for their high-end phone, the Nokia 8800. A recent reunion with YMO pals Hosono and Takahashi also caused a stir in the Japanese press. They released a single "Rescue" in 2007 and a DVD "HAS/YMO" in 2008. On July 10, 2014, Sakamoto released a statement indicating that he had been diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer in late June of the same year. He announced a break from his work while he sought treatment and recovery. On August 3, 2015, Sakamoto posted on his website that he was "in great shape ... I am thinking about returning to work" and announced that he would be providing music for Yoji Yamada's Haha to Kuraseba (Living with My Mother).

Sakamoto is a member of the anti-nuclear organization Stop Rokkasho and has demanded the closing of the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant. In 2012, he organized the "No Nukes 2012" concert, which featured performances by 18 groups, including Yellow Magic Orchestra and Kraftwerk. Sakamoto is also known as a critic of copyright law, arguing in 2009 that it is antiquated in the information age. He argued that in "the last 100 years, only a few organizations have dominated the music world and ripped off both fans and creators" and that "with the internet we are going back to having tribal attitudes towards music."

In 2006 Sakamoto, in collaboration with Japan's largest independent music company Avex Group, founded Commmons, a record label seeking to change the manner in which music is produced. Sakamoto has explained that Commmons is not his label, but is a platform for all aspiring artists to join as equal collaborators, to share the benefits of the music industry. On the initiative's "About" page, the label is described as a project that "aims to find new possibilities for music, while making meaningful contribution to culture and society." The name "Commmons" is spelt with three "m"s because the third "m" stands for music. From 2013 until now 5 albums have been releasesd 3 with Nobuyuki Nakajima and 2 with Taylor Deupree

Since 78 Sakamoto has released almost 100 albums (solo & soundtrack) , on top of that 2 dozen collaboration albums and YMO 33 years 110+ albums , every 16 weeks an album for 33 years, amazing workethic, puts lots of artists to shame. Married life obviously suffered and he has been unattached for most of his career, still he has two daughters one of which has stepped into her parents career (mother=Akiko Yano), the J-pop singer Miu Sakamoto.

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Ryuichi Sakamoto, one of the pioneering figures of Japanese electronic music, demonstrates his versatility on this change-of-pace album. Released in 2004, 04 is dominated by Sakamoto's prowess on the acoustic piano, and features excerpts from several of his scores for motion pictures (including his music for Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence), television commercials (such as a campaign for Louis Vuitton), and video games ("Seven Samurai: Ending Theme" was composed for the PS2 game Seven Samurai 20XX).



Ryuichi Sakamoto - 04 (flac 244mb)

01 Asience (Fast Piano) 2:20
02 Yamazaki 2002 3:03
03 +33 5:45
04 Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence 4:42
05 Rain 1:31
06 Perspective 5:28
07 Undercooled (Acoustica) 4:13
08 Riot In Lagos 4:35
09 Theme For Roningai (Symphonic) 4:42
10 Tamago 2004 3:16
11 Bibo No Aozora7:16
12 Seven Samurai (Ending Theme)6:09
13 Dear Liz 2:10
14 Asience (Original) 1:44

Ryuichi Sakamoto - 04  (ogg 121mb)

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Internationally acclaimed musician and composer Ryuichi Sakamoto revisits some of his music of the past in a new and intimate setting on this album. 05 features Sakamoto's new interpretations of some of his noted film and television scores, this time arranged for solo piano. 05 includes Sakamoto's elegant new performances of music from the motion pictures The Last Emperor and The Sheltering Sky, as well as pieces from his solo albums and a smattering of new material.



Ryuichi Sakamoto - 05 (flac 244mb)

01 Tibetan Dance 4:22
02 A Flower Is Not A Flower 6:35
03 Amore 5:09
04 Energy Flow 4:04
05 Aqua 5:29
06 The Last Emperor 6:42
07 Happyend 5:02
08 Thousand Knives 6:09
09 Fountain 2:22
10 The Sheltering Sky 4:54
11 Lost Theme 4:37
12 Shining Boy & Little Randy 4:56
13 Reversing 3:33
14 Rainforest 2:01

Ryuichi Sakamoto - 05  (ogg   139mb)

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In 2009, Universal International released Ryuichi Sakamoto's Playing the Piano, a collection of solo piano pieces he calls “self-covers”; that is, a newly recorded collection of his own compositons and themes performed solo. The set contains 12 selections. They are mostly themes from the films The Last Emperor, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, and The Sheltering Sky, with cues from others including "Bolerish," from Brian DePalma's 2002 film Femme Fatale. For the most part, it is a spare and lovely beauty of an album, with few surpises save for the elegance that Sakamoto performs these indelible pieces with. In 2010, Decca Records in the U.S. re-relased this album as a deluxe edition with a new one entitled Out of Noise, recorded during 2009. It, too, contains a dozen selections, all but one composed and recorded the year of release. This disc is the real surpise in the specially packaged and priced set. It concerns itself where music fades and enters into noise, and the no man's land where noise sorts itself out into a system recognized as music. Unlike Playing the Piano, Out of Noise is a more challenging, yet more compelling listen. While it begins with the poetic, atmospheric solo piano piece "Hibari," as a coda to Disc 1, it quickly launches into "Hwit" and "Still Life," both recorded with the U.K.-based viol ensemble Fretwork. The ambient "In the Red," with field-recorded voice samples, features guitarist Christian Fennesz. In 2008, Sakamoto participated in the Cape Farewell Disko Bay Expedition to study and observe climate change; there he visited Greenland's fastest moving glacier. Three of the pieces here -- "Disko," "Ice," and "Glacier" -- reflect the place where Sakamoto claims he left part of his soul. In them, the sounds of the glaicer and the surrounding landscape were recorded, then treated in the studio and added to by other musicians, including guitarist Keigo Oyamada, vocalist Karen H. Filskov, and Skúlli Sverrisson, who plays dobro on the final one of these. "To Standford" is a solo jazz piano piece, or rather has inside its grain, the beauty and ternderness of great jazz pianists from Bill Evans to Errol Garner to Kenny Drew. Ultimately, it's Out of Noise that makes the entire package worth buying for the first time, or purchasing Playing the Piano again. Despite revealing already known dimensions of Sakamoto's musical persona, it also uncovers new ones.



Ryuichi Sakamoto - Playing The Piano /out of noise tour book  (flac 513mb)

01 tamago
02 lost child
03 bolerish.
04 lost theme.
05 bibo no aozora.
06 rain.
07 tibetan dance.
08 happyend.
09 thousand knives.
10 merry christmas mr. lawrence.
11 the sheltering sky.
12 the last emperor.
13 parolibre.
14 aqua.
15 put your hands up.

Ryuichi Sakamoto-playing the piano/out of noise tour book

16 concerto no.3 in d minor after alessandro marcello, bbw 974 II. adagio
17 tango
18 asience
19 flower is not a flower
20 amore
21 normandia
22  energy flow
23 opus
24 seven samurai
25 mizu no naka no bagatelle - suntory old cm
26 koko
27 undercooled
28 women without men
29 silk endroll
30 sweet revenge

Ryuichi Sakamoto - Plaing The Piano/Out Of Noise Tour Book  (flac 273mb)

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Aug 29, 2015

RhoDeo 1534 Grooves

Hello, racewalking why is that a sport, who made this crazy movement an olympic sport ? Was it the ministry of silly walks ? Luckily there was a magnificent 100mtrs final, the fastest women's legal race ever.and a caucasian woman won, well done Dafne Schippers 10.63 should be the new world record, amazing race. Meanwhile requests are still welcome

Today more from San Francisco, a band active from 1967 to 1983, the band was pivotal in the development of soul, funk, and psychedelic music. Headed by singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist Sly Stone, and containing several of his family members and friends, the band was the first major American funkrock band to have an "integrated, multi-gender" lineup.  ... N'joy

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Sly & the Family Stone harnessed all of the disparate musical and social trends of the late '60s, creating a wild, brilliant fusion of soul, rock, R&B, psychedelia, and funk that broke boundaries down without a second thought. Led by Sly Stone, the Family Stone was comprised of men and women, and blacks and whites, making the band the first fully integrated group in rock's history. That integration shone through the music, as well as the group's message. Before Stone, very few soul and R&B groups delved into political and social commentary; after him, it became a tradition in soul, funk, and hip-hop. And, along with James Brown, Stone brought hard funk into the mainstream. the Family Stone's arrangements were ingenious, filled with unexpected group vocals, syncopated rhythms, punchy horns, and pop melodies. Their music was joyous, but as the '60s ended, so did the good times. Stone became disillusioned with the ideals he had been preaching in his music, becoming addicted to a variety of drugs in the process. His music gradually grew slower and darker, culminating in 1971's There's a Riot Going On, which set the pace for '70s funk with its elastic bass, slurred vocals, and militant Black Power stance. Stone was able to turn out one more modern funk classic, 1973's Fresh, before slowly succumbing to his addictions, which gradually sapped him of his once prodigious talents. Nevertheless, his music continued to provide the basic template for urban soul, funk, and even hip-hop well into the '90s.

Sly Stone (born Sylvester Stewart, March 15, 1944) and his family moved from his home state of Texas to San Francisco in the '50s. He had already begun to express an interest in music, and when he was 16, he had a regional hit with "Long Time Away." Stone studied music composition, theory, and trumpet at Vallejo Junior College in the early '60s; simultaneously, he began playing in several groups on the Bay Area scene, often with his brother Fred. Soon, he had become a disc jockey at the R&B station KSOL, later switching to KDIA. The radio appearances led to a job producing records for Autumn Records. While at Autumn, he worked with a number of San Franciscan garage and psychedelic bands, including the Beau Brummels, the Great Society, Bobby Freeman, and the Mojo Men.

During 1966, Stone formed the Stoners, which featured trumpeter Cynthia Robinson. Though the Stoners didn't last long, he brought Robinson along as one of the core members of his next group, Sly & the Family Stone. Formed in early 1967, the Family Stone also featured Fred Stewart (guitar, vocals), Larry Graham, Jr. (bass, vocals), Greg Errico (drums), Jerry Martini (saxophone), and Rosie Stone (piano), who all were of different racial backgrounds. The group's eclectic music and multiracial composition made them distinctive from the numerous flower-power bands in San Francisco, and their first single, "I Ain't Got Nobody," became a regional hit for the local label Loadstone. The band signed with Epic Records shortly afterward, releasing their debut album, A Whole New Thing, by the end of the year. The record stiffed, but the follow-up, Dance to the Music, generated a Top Ten pop and R&B hit with its title track early in 1968. Life followed later in 1968, but the record failed to capitalize on its predecessor's success. "Everyday People," released late in 1968, turned their fortunes back around, rocketing to the top of the pop and R&B charts and setting the stage for the breakthrough success of 1969's Stand!

Featuring "Everyday People," "Sing a Simple Song," "Stand," and "I Want to Take You Higher," Stand! became the Family Stone's first genuine hit album, climbing to number 13 and spending over 100 weeks on the charts. Stand! also marked the emergence of the political bent in Stone's songwriting ("Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey"), as well as the development of hard-edged, improvisational funk like "Sex Machine." the Family Stone quickly became known as one of the best live bands of the late '60s, and their performance at Woodstock was widely hailed as one of the festival's best. The non-LP singles "Hot Fun in the Summertime" and "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)" b/w "Everybody Is a Star" became hits, reaching number two and number one respectively in late 1969/early 1970. Both singles were included on Greatest Hits, which became a number two record upon its fall 1970 release. While the group was at the height of its popularity, Sly was beginning to unravel behind the scenes. Developing a debilitating addiction to narcotics, Stone soon became notorious for arriving late for concerts, frequently missing the shows all together.

Stone's growing personal problems, as well as his dismay with the slow death of the civil rights movement and other political causes, surfaced on There's a Riot Goin' On. Though the album shot to number one upon its fall 1971 release, the record -- including "Family Affair," Stone's last number one single -- was dark, hazy, and paranoid, and his audience began to shrink slightly. During 1972, several key members of the Family Stone, including Graham and Errico, left the band; they were replaced by Rusty Allen and Andy Newmark, respectively. The relatively lighter Fresh appeared in the summer of 1973, and it went into the Top Ten on the strength of the Top Ten R&B hit "If You Want Me to Stay." Released the following year, Small Talk was a moderate hit, reaching number 15 on the charts and going gold, but it failed to generate a big hit single. High on You, released in late 1975 and credited only to Sly Stone, confirmed that his power and popularity had faded. "I Get High on You" reached the R&B Top Ten, but the album made no lasting impact.

Disco had overtaken funk in terms of popularity, and even if Sly wanted to compete with disco, he wasn't in shape to make music. He had become addicted to cocaine, his health was frequently poor, and he was often in trouble with the law. His recordings had slowed to a trickle, and Epic decided to close out his contract in 1979 with Ten Years Too Soon, a compilation of previously released material that had the original funky rhythm tracks replaced with disco beats. Stone signed with Warner Brothers that same year, crafting the comeback effort Back on the Right Track with several original members of the Family Stone, but the record was critically panned and a commercial failure. In light of the album's lack of success, Stone retreated even further, eventually joining forces with George Clinton on Funkadelic's 1981 album The Electric Spanking of War Babies. Following the album's release, Stone toured with Clinton's P-Funk All-Stars, which led him to embark on his own tour, as well as a stint with Bobby Womack. The culmination of this burst of activity was 1983's Ain't but the One Way, an album that was ignored. Later that year, Stone was arrested for cocaine possession; the following year, he entered rehab.

Stone appeared on Jesse Johnson's 1986 R&B hit "Crazay." The following year, he dueted with Martha Davis on "Love & Affection" for the Soul Man soundtrack; he also he recorded "Eek-a-Bo-Static," a single that didn't chart. Stone was arrested and imprisoned for cocaine possession by the end of 1987, and he was never able to recover from the final arrest. Stone continued to battle his addiction, with varying degrees of success. By his 1993 induction to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, he had disappeared from public view. Avenue Records gave Stone a recording contract in 1995, but nothing would be recorded.

A Sly and the Family Stone tribute took place at the 2006 Grammy Awards on February 8, 2006. The original plan, to have been a surprise for audiences, was to feature a reunion performance by the original Sly and the Family Stone lineup as the highlight of the tribute. That sadly ended in chaos. The band did do a decent show at North Sea Jazz in 2007

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Stand! is the pinnacle of Sly & the Family Stone's early work, a record that represents a culmination of the group's musical vision and accomplishment. Life hinted at this record's boundless enthusiasm and blurred stylistic boundaries, yet everything simply gels here, resulting in no separation between the astounding funk, effervescent irresistible melodies, psychedelicized guitars, and deep rhythms. Add to this a sharpened sense of pop songcraft, elastic band interplay, and a flowering of Sly's social consciousness, and the result is utterly stunning. Yes, the jams ("Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey," "Sex Machine") wind up meandering ever so slightly, but they're surrounded by utter brilliance, from the rousing call to arms of "Stand!" to the unification anthem "Everyday People" to the unstoppable "I Want to Take You Higher." All of it sounds like the Family Stone, thanks not just to the communal lead vocals but to the brilliant interplay, but each track is distinct, emphasizing a different side of their musical personality. As a result, Stand! winds up infectious and informative, invigorating and thought-provoking -- stimulating in every sense of the word. Few records of its time touched it, and Sly topped it only by offering its opposite the next time out.



Sly & The Family Stone - Stand !  (flac 311mb)

01 Stand! 3:10
02 Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey 5:59
03 I Want To Take You Higher 5:24
04 Somebody's Watching You 3:21
05 Sing A Simple Song 3:57
06 Everyday People 2:22
07 Sex Machine 13:48
08 You Can Make It If You Try 3:43
Bonus Tracks
09 Stand! (Single Version In Mono) 3:09
10 I Want To Take You Higher (Single Version In Mono) 3:02
11 You Can Make It If You Try (Unissued Single Version In Mono) 3:40
12 Soul Clappin' II 3:27
13 My Brain (Zig-Zag) 3:18

Sly & The Family Stone - Stand ! (ogg 145mb)

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Released in 1970 during the stopgap between Stand! and There's a Riot Goin' On, Greatest Hits inadvertently arrived at precisely the right moment, summarizing Sly & the Family Stone's joyous hit-making run on the pop and R&B charts. Technically, only four songs here reached the Top Ten, with only two others hitting the Top 40, but judging this solely on charts is misleading, since this is simply a peerless singles collection. This summarizes their first four albums perfectly (almost all of Stand! outside of the two jams and "Somebody's Watching You" is here), adding the non-LP singles "Hot Fun in the Summertime," "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)," and "Everybody Is a Star," possibly the loveliest thing they ever recorded. But, this isn't merely a summary (and, if it was just that, Anthology, the early-'80s comp that covers Riot and Fresh would be stronger than this), it's one of the greatest party records of all time. Music is rarely as vivacious, vigorous, and vibrant as this, and captured on one album, the spirit, sound, and songs of Sly & the Family Stone are all the more stunning. Greatest hits don't come better than this -- in fact, music rarely does.



Sly & The Family Stone - Greatest Hits (flac 246mb)

01 I Want To Take You Higher 5:22
02 Everybody Is A Star 3:00
03 Stand! 3:05
04 Life 2:58
05 Fun 2:21
06 You Can Make It If You Try 3:38
07 Dance To The Music 2:58
08 Everyday People 2:20
09 Hot Fun In The Summertime 2:37
10 M'Lady 2:45
11 Sing A Simple Song 3:55
12 Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Again) 4:46

Sly & The Family Stone - Greatest Hits (ogg  102mb)

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It's easy to write off There's a Riot Goin' On as one of two things -- Sly Stone's disgusted social commentary or the beginning of his slow descent into addiction. It's both of these things, of course, but pigeonholing it as either winds up dismissing the album as a whole, since it is so bloody hard to categorize. What's certain is that Riot is unlike any of Sly & the Family Stone's other albums, stripped of the effervescence that flowed through even such politically aware records as Stand! This is idealism soured, as hope is slowly replaced by cynicism, joy by skepticism, enthusiasm by weariness, sex by pornography, thrills by narcotics. Joy isn't entirely gone -- it creeps through the cracks every once and awhile and, more disturbing, Sly revels in his stoned decadence. What makes Riot so remarkable is that it's hard not to get drawn in with him, as you're seduced by the narcotic grooves, seductive vocals slurs, leering electric pianos, and crawling guitars. As the themes surface, it's hard not to nod in agreement, but it's a junkie nod, induced by the comforting coma of the music. And damn if this music isn't funk at its deepest and most impenetrable -- this is dense music, nearly impenetrable, but not from its deep grooves, but its utter weariness. Sly's songwriting remains remarkably sharp, but only when he wants to write -- the foreboding opener "Luv N' Haight," the scarily resigned "Family Affair," the cracked cynical blues "Time," and "(You Caught Me) Smilin'." Ultimately, the music is the message, and while it's dark music, it's not alienating -- it's seductive despair, and that's the scariest thing about it.



 Sly & The Family Stone - There's A Riot Goin' On (flac  345mb)

01 Luv N' Haight 4:02
02 Just Like A Baby 5:11
03 Poet 3:01
04 Family Affair 3:05
05 Africa Talks To You "The Asphalt Jungle" 8:45
06 There's A Riot Goin' On 0:04
07 Brave & Strong 3:29
08 (You Caught Me) Smilin' 2:54
09 Time 3:04
10 Spaced Cowboy 3:58
11 Runnin' Away 2:57
12 Thank You For Talkin' To Me Africa 7:16
Bonus Tracks
13 Runnin' Away (Single Version) 2:42
14 My Gorilla Is My Butler (Instrumental) 3:10
15 Do You Know What? (Instrumental) 7:14
16 That's Pretty Clean (Instrumental) 4:12

  Sly & The Family Stone - There's A Riot Goin' On (ogg  102mb)

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Aug 27, 2015

RhoDeo 1534 Goldy Rhox 224

Hello, today the 224th post of Goldy Rhox, classic pop rock. In the darklight an American hard rock band from Los Angeles, formed in 1985. The classic lineup as signed to Geffen Records in 1986 consisted of vocalist Axl Rose, lead guitarist Slash, rhythm guitarist Izzy Stradlin, bassist Duff McKagan, and drummer Steven Adler. Rose is the only remaining original member, in a lineup that comprises Use Your Illusion–era keyboardist Dizzy Reed, guitarist Richard Fortus, bassist Tommy Stinson, drummer Frank Ferrer and keyboardist Chris Pitman. The band has released six studio albums, accumulating sales of more than 100 million records worldwide, including shipments of 45 million in the United States, making our mystery band one of the world's best-selling bands of all time.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.


Today's mystery album is the debut studio album by today's mystery American hard rock band . It was released on July 21, 1987, by Geffen Records to massive commercial success, topping the Billboard 200 and eventually becoming the best-selling debut album as well as the 11th best-selling album in the United States. With approximately 28 million copies sold worldwide, it is also one of the best-selling records ever. Although critics were ambivalent toward the album when it was first released, today's mystery album has since received retrospective acclaim and been viewed as one of the greatest albums of all time.

After some weeks of rehearsal, the band entered Daryl Dragon's Rumbo Recorders in January 1987. Two weeks were spent recording basic tracks, with Clink splicing together the best takes with his razor blade. The total budget for the album was about $370,000.[2] According to drummer Steven Adler, the percussion was done in just six days, but Rose's vocals took much longer as he insisted on doing them one line at a time, in a perfectionism that drove the rest of the band away from the studio as he worked. Many of the songs on Appetite For Destruction began as solo tracks that individual band members wrote separate from the band, only to be completed later.

The album's planned cover art, based on Robert Williams' painting "Appetite for Destruction", depicted a robotic rapist about to be punished by a metal avenger. After several music retailers refused to stock the album, the label compromised and put the controversial cover art inside, replacing it with an image depicting a cross and skulls of the five band members (designed by Billy White Jr., originally as a tattoo), each skull representing one member of the band. The two sides were not conventionally labeled "A" and "B", but "G" and "R". Tracks 1–6 which compose side "G" all deal with drugs and hard life in the big city ("Guns" side). The remaining tracks, which compose side "R", all deal with love, sex and relationships ("Roses" side).

By September 2008, it had been certified 18× platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), having shipped 18 million copies in the United States, making it the country's 11th best-selling album ever. According to Billboard in 2008, it is also the best-selling debut album of all time in the US. Rolling Stone ranked it at sixty-two on their list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. A MFSL remastered version of the album was released in 1997, a copy of which is up for grabs here..   N'Joy



Goldy Rhox 224   (flac 384mb)

Goldy Rhox 224    (ogg 128mb)


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Aug 26, 2015

RhoDeo 1534 Aetix

Hello,

Today an American musical group headed by drummer and composer Anton Fier, first formed in 1981. Aside from Fier, the Palominos membership has been wildly elastic, with only bassist Bill Laswell and guitarist Nicky Skopelitis appearing on every album. While their records usually featured a core set of musicians and a certain emotional continuity throughout the bulk of an album, various guest appearances resulted in stylistic changes from track to track. . Plenty to  .....N'Joy

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The Golden Palominos were not a group per se, but rather the revolving-door project of drummer, programmer, and bandleader Anton Fier. Born June 20, 1956, in Cleveland, Ohio, Fier first made his mark as the drummer on the Feelies' seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms. After leaving the group, he joined the punk-jazz unit the Lounge Lizards before returning home to Cleveland, where he was recruited by the legendary new wave band Pere Ubu for the album Song of the Bailing Man. After exiting Ubu, Fier again relocated to downtown New York City, where he founded the first Golden Palominos lineup in 1981. In its primary live incarnation, the band was an avant-funk supergroup comprised of Fier and another drummer, David Moss, saxophonist John Zorn, guitarist Arto Lindsay, and a pair of bassists, Bill Laswell and Jamaaladeen Tacuma; on their self-titled 1983 debut, the Palominos were augmented by Fred Frith, Nicky Skopelitis, and Mark Miller.

Over the next few years, Fier moved away from the first record's experimental noise into far more traditional pop territory; simultaneously, he largely jettisoned the first album's lineup in favor of an ever-changing collection of punk legends, post-punk superstars, up-and-comers, and N.Y.C.-scene vets. After enlisting ex-Raybeat Jody Harris to help him co-write much of the music, Fier recruited vocalists ranging from R.E.M.'s Michael Stipe and Cream's Jack Bruce to PIL's John Lydon and newcomer Syd Straw. Rounded out by musicians like former dB Chris Stamey, guitar greats Richard Thompson and Henry Kaiser, and P-Funk alumni Bernie Worrell and Mike Hampton, the revamped Golden Palominos reached an early peak with 1985's Visons of Excess, a diverse yet cogent collection highlighted by a cover of Moby Grape's "Omaha" and the original "Boy (Go)."

With 1986's Blast of Silence, the group flirted with elements of country and folk; while Stipe and Lydon were noticeably absent, many of the other players featured on Visions of Excess remained, along with new additions including guitarist T-Bone Burnett, Numbers Band singer Robert Kidney, artist/producer Don Dixon, singer/songwriter Peter Blegvad, Matthew Sweet, and Flying Burrito Brothers alum Sneaky Pete Kleinow. On 1989's moody A Dead Horse, Fier again shifted gears, settling on a constant lineup of Laswell, Skopelitis, Kidney, and ex-Information Society vocalist Amanda Kramer along with a handful of guests, including former Rolling Stone Mick Taylor.

1991's Drunk With Passion returned to the all-star format; Stipe and Thompson again rejoined the fold, welcoming newcomers like Sugar's Bob Mould. This Is How It Feels, a sophisticated concept album inspired by the Graham Greene novel The End of the Road followed in 1993; along with core members like Laswell, Skopelitis, Worrell, and Kramer, the record spotlighted vocalists Lori Carson and Lydia Kavanaugh, as well as bass great Bootsy Collins. 1994's Pure featured many of the same principal players, while 1996's Dead Inside, essentially from a trio comprised of Fier, ex-Psychedelic Furs guitarist Knox Chandler, and vocalist/lyricist Nicole Blackman, explored electronic and ambient soundscapes. Dead Inside would be the final album by the Golden Palominos with various compilations being the only additions to the discography.

Both Syd Straw and Lori Carson have gone on to moderately successful and critically acclaimed solo careers, with Carson a frequent contributor to television shows and movies. A compilation of some of Carson's contributed songs, called Stolen Beauty, was released by Rykodisc in 2003, and her last solo record, The Finest Thing, was released in 2004. She intends to have a new record, entitled Another Year, out in March 2012, and has a book scheduled to be published in 2013.

Anton Fier re-appeared on the music scene in 2009, producing Drivin' 'n' Cryin's album The Great American Bubble Factory,[3] which was the band's first album in 12 years.  In 2010, the Golden Palominos played two shows in New York City: a May 7 show at Le Poisson Rouge, and a May 11 show at The Living Room. Both shows were an unqualified success and speculation began as to if more dates or a re-formation of the band was in the future. At around the same time, Fier began drumming again in New York City as a sideman to his friend Tony Scherr, and Kevn Kinney, the lead singer of Drivin' 'n' Cryin', re-connected with Fier at these shows.

Fier and Kinney rekindled their friendship and began rehearsing together again, which then progressed into starting a Kickstarter campaign  to fund a new Kevin Kinney album. The album, A Good Country Mile, was released on February 21, 2012, and is billed as 'Kevn Kinney and The Golden Palominos' (composed of Fier on drums, Scherr on guitars, and Andy Hess, formerly of Gov't Mule, on bass as well as Aaron Lee Tasjan on guitars and backing vocals). Initial reviews of the album have been positive with Jambands saying the „...resulting music is raw and lovely and real as hell.“ While this represents the first music from the Palominos in nearly 15 years, any further projects exclusively under the Golden Palominos moniker have not yet materialized.

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The first effort from Anton Fier's revolving-door band is the record which most reflects the group's downtown New York origins. Recalling the avant-funk of Material, The Golden Palominos spotlights a core roster of Fier, guitarists Arto Lindsay and Fred Frith, bassist Bill Laswell, and multi-instrumentalist John Zorn; the music is wildly experimental, incorporating turntables and other hip-hop staples (a rather adventurous notion back in 1983) as well as other oddball ideas (clarinets played underwater and the like) which miss the mark as often as they hit, but make for fascinating listening nevertheless.



The Golden Palominos - The Golden Palominos  (flac 246mb)

01 Clean Plate 6:32
02 Hot Seat 5:13
03 Under The Cap 5:32
04 Monday Night 6:29
05 Cookout 4:38
06 I.D. 6:45
07 Two Sided Fist 7:42

 The Golden Palominos - The Golden Palominos  (ogg  95mb)

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The first in a long series of about-faces and left turns, Visions of Excess forgoes the noise-funk of the Golden Palominos' debut in favor of more pop-oriented material and staggering lineup of underground luminaries. Built around a nucleus of Anton Fier, bassist Bill Laswell, guitarist Jody Harris, and keyboardist Bernie Worrell, the album recruits vocalists from Jack Bruce to John Lydon to, most impressively, Michael Stipe, who turns in striking performances on the opening "Boy (Go)" (featuring guitarist Richard Thompson), the Jefferson Airplane-like "Clustering Train," and a cover of Moby Grape's "Omaha." The real find of the record is singer Syd Straw, who makes her debut on the lovely "(Kind of) True" and "Buenos Aires" and more than holds her own with the big guns.



The Golden Palominos - Visions of Excess  (flac 230mb)

01 Boy (Go) 5:31
02 Clustering Train 6:10
03 Omaha 3:13
04 The Animal Speaks 4:10
05 Silver Bullet 5:10
06 (Kind Of) True 4:47
07 Buenos Aires 3:48
08 Only One Party 4:31

The Golden Palominos - Visions of Excess (ogg  80mb )

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By and large, A Dead Horse tosses out the supersession approach of previous Golden Palominos efforts to concentrate on a steady core roster of Anton Fier, Bill Laswell, and Nicky Skopelitis; vocal chores are evenly divided among the Numbers Band's Robert Kidney and Amanda Kramer, formerly of Information Society. A subdued, moody effort, A Dead Horse lacks the energy and spark of the group's earlier work; only Kramer's lovely "Darklands" makes much of a lasting impression.



The Golden Palominos - A Dead Horse  (flac 259mb)

01 Wild River 4:43
02 Shattered Image 5:25
03 Angel Of Death 4:44
04 Lucky 4:56
05 Darklands 6:48
06 A Letter Back 7:04
07 Over 7:38

The Golden Palominos - A Dead Horse  (ogg 99mb)

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Aug 25, 2015

RhoDeo 1534 Re-Ups 29

Hello,

Storage maybe dirt cheap these days -compared to 5 years ago, but the hosts are much more money orientated and look at turnover and notice that keeping data longer than 1 month isn't making them money. Thus the coming months i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a small number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relativly quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section prefarbly at the page where the expired link resides....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. As my back up ogg hard disk is nonresponsive currently, i most likely will post a flac instead~for the the pre medio 2011 posts~ but i would think that is not really a problem...updates will be posted here and yes sign a name to your request and please do it from the page where the link died!

Looka here another batch of re-ups

4x Holger Czukay Back In Flac (Movies , Rome Remains Rome, La Luna,. On The Way To The Peak Of Normal)


3x Czukay NOW In Flac (On The Way To The Peak Of Normal, Czukay & Sylvian - Flux + Mutability and  Plight & Premonition)

3x Desert Angels Back in Flac (VA - The Divas From Mali, Dimi Mint Abba - Music and Songs of Mauritania, Malouma - Nour)



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Aug 24, 2015

RhoDeo 1534 Quest 04

Hello,  well that F1 race wasn't that sensational-the rain came 2 hours late, Vettel really lost his temper as his tire disintegrated seconds after it would have sent him god knows where when you do o-rouge at 320 kmh. It cost him his 3rd place after the Mercedes boys behind them there was the usual racing going on Rookie Verstappen went from 18th on the grid to 8th, however another 3 rounds and he'd been 5th.. Another dutchman was close to win the first real stage of the Vuelta Tom Dumoulin just has too much to carry along (as a top timetrialist) compared to a columbian climber but great return to the limelight after crashing out of the Tour. Another dutchman picked up another Horse riding title, bizarrely that small country is top of the horse world.  But the biggest news was that Gatlin stuttered and Bolt got away 1/100 of a second, the hysterical media claiming it a victory over doping such a bunch of parroting bullshit sellers.



Today the start of a new series that will be running into the new year, 24 episodes of Elvenquest. It's is a sitcom about a misanthropic writer of fantasy novels who finds himself whisked away into a parallel universe by an elf, a dwarf and a warrior princess, where he must undertake to find the Sword of Asnagar in order to save Lower Earth from the evil Lord Darkness before he can get home.

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Plot

During the Third Age of Elven Princes of Lower Earth, a band of noble warriors – Vidar the Elf Lord (Boyd), Penthiselea the Warrior Princess (Winkleman) and Dean the Dwarf (Eldon) – plan to save Lower Earth from the evil rule of Lord Darkness by searching for the Sword of Asnagar, "for whoso'er wields the sword shall rule all of Lower Earth."[2] However, they first have to discover "The Chosen One" who will lead them to the Sword, whose name is "Amis". Amis is a dog belonging to Sam Porter, a misanthropic fantasy novelist in the real world.

Vidar, Penthiselea and Dean travel via a portal to take Amis, who is with Sam at a book signing in Totnes High Street, to Lower Earth. When they take Amis, Sam follows them and both Sam and Amis arrive in Lower Earth. When they arrive in Lower Earth, Amis is transformed into a human (played by Lamb), retaining many of his canine traits, such as becoming excited when there is a knock at the door, and being totally devoted to Sam. Sam believes he has been kidnapped by deranged fans until he sees the world outside the room in which he awakes. He asks to be sent back home, but is told that the portal is closed and can only be opened by the same Sword of Asnagar that Amis must seek.

Sam decides to travel with Amis, Vidar, Penthiselea and Dean to find the Sword. Meanwhile, Lord Darkness (Alistair McGowan) is planning to stop them from finding the Sword, helped by his evil but dimwitted assistant Kreech (also played by Eldon). Sam proves invaluable in using his modern instincts to trick his way past various creatures barring their way. For instance, he bluffs a three-headed troll guardian of Darkness' fortress in the same way as he would a security guard at a nightclub, distracting it long enough for Dean the dwarf to attack. He also tends to expect secret tunnels and concealed doors because that's the sort of thing he would have written into one of his plots. He is often right.




Characters

Sam Porter (Stephen Mangan). An author of fantasy novels with a jaded attitude, especially towards his more fanatical fans. As the series opens his career and personal life are not going well.

Amis, the Chosen One (Dave Lamb). Originally Sam's pet dog and best friend in the world, he transforms into a human in Lower Earth but retains canine traits and behaviours.

Vidar the Elf Lord, (Darren Boyd), last of a mighty family of Elf Lords, and the leader of the Questers, despite being somewhat dim. His name may be inspired by Víðarr, a god in Norse mythology associated with vengeance.

Penthiselea the Warrior Princess (Sophie Winkleman Series 1-3) (Ingrid Oliver Series 4) in silver breastplate armour and thigh-high boots, who has been promised to Vidar since childhood. Sam is very interested in her, but having been raised as a Warrior Princess she has no concept of relationships with men. Her name may be inspired by Penthesilea, a legendary Amazon warrior-queen.

Dean the Dwarf (Kevin Eldon), a mighty if diminutive warrior with unsavoury personal habits.

Lord Darkness (Alistair McGowan), Lord of Evil, whose efforts to dominate Lower Earth are frustrated by the Questers and his own staff of extremely dimwitted minions.

Kreech (Kevin Eldon), the Right Hand of Darkness, and only slightly less dimwitted than the other minions.

Other characters played by Chris Pavlo.



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Elvenquest 04 The Distress Call (mp3  25mb)

04 The Distress Call 27:15


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previously

Elven Quest 01 The Chosen One (mp3  25mb)
Elvenquest 02 The Search For Amis (mp3  25mb)
Elvenquest 03 The Tower Of Tests (mp3  25mb)

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Aug 23, 2015

Sundaze 1534

Hello,  lot's of sports this weekend a F1 race in that classic circuit, Spa..Rain predicted, could become a race of attrition.. Then there's Athletics championship from Being, The Vuelta started today with a crazy timetrail too crazy to race on. The Tour of Spain starts sunday then...

More today from that Japanese musician, activist, composer, record producer, writer, singer, pianist, and actor based in Tokyo and New York. Gaining major success in 1978 as a member of the electronic music group Yellow Magic Orchestra, Sakamoto served on keyboards and sometimes vocals. He concurrently pursued a solo career, if ever anyone painted pictures with sound, Ryuichi Sakamoto supercedes them all. That said he does like to collaborate with 'brothers' of the same mindset a selection of these is here to.... N'joy

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Sakamoto entered the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music in 1970, earning a B.A. in music composition and an M.A. with special emphasis on both electronic and ethnic music. He studied ethnomusicology there with the intention of becoming a researcher in the field, due to his interest in various world music traditions, particularly the Japanese (especially Okinawan), Indian and African musical traditions. He was also trained in classical music and began experimenting with the electronic music equipment available at the university, including synthesizers such as the Buchla, Moog, and ARP. One of Sakamoto's classical influences was Claude Debussy, who he described as his "hero" and stated that “Asian music heavily influenced Debussy, and Debussy heavily influenced me. So, the music goes around the world and comes full circle.”

After working as a session musician with Haruomi Hosono and Yukihiro Takahashi in 1977, the trio formed the internationally successful electronic music band Yellow Magic Orchestra (YMO) in 1978. Known for their seminal influence on electronic music, The group's work has had a lasting influence across genres, ranging from hip hop and techno to acid house and general melodic music. Sakamoto was the songwriter and composer for a number of the band's hit songs—including "Yellow Magic (Tong Poo)" (1978), "Technopolis" (1979), "Nice Age" (1980), "Ongaku" (1983) and "You've Got to Help Yourself" (1983). He also sang on several songs, such as "Kimi ni Mune Kyun" (1983). .

Sakamoto released his first solo album Thousand Knives of Ryūichi Sakamoto in mid-1978 with the help of Hideki Matsutake—Hosono also contributed to the song "Thousand Knives". The album experimented with different styles, such as "Thousand Knives" and "The End of Asia"—in which electronic music was fused with traditional Japanese music—while "Grasshoppers" is a more minimalistic piano song. The album was recorded from April to July 1978 with a variety of electronic musical instruments, including various synthesizers, such as the KORG PS-3100, a polyphonic synthesizer; the Oberheim Eight-Voice; the Moog III-C; the Polymoog, the Minimoog; the Micromoog; the Korg VC-10, which is a vocoder; the KORG SQ-10, which is an analog sequencer; the Syn-Drums, an electronic drum kit; and the microprocessor-based Roland MC-8 Microcomposer, which is a music sequencer that was programmed by Matsutake and played by Sakamoto.

In 1980 Sakamoto released the solo album B-2 Unit, which has been referred to as his "edgiest" record and is known for the electronic
song "Riot in Lagos", which is considered an early example of electro music (electro-funk).The 1980 release of "Riot in Lagos" was listed by The Guardian in 2011 as one of the 50 key events in the history of dance music. Also in 1980, Sakamoto released the single "War Head/Lexington Queen", an experimental synthpop and electro record, and began a long-standing collaboration with David Sylvian, when he co-wrote and performed on the Japan track "Taking Islands In Africa". In 1982, Sakamoto worked on another collaboration with Sylvian, a single entitled "Bamboo Houses/Bamboo Music".

Sakamoto released a number of solo albums during the 1980s. While primarily focused on the piano and synthesizer, this series of albums included collaborations with artists such as Sylvian, David Byrne, Thomas Dolby, Nam June Paik and Iggy Pop. Sakamoto would alternate between exploring a variety of musical styles, ideas and genres—captured most notably in his 1983 album Illustrated Musical Encyclopedia—and focusing on a specific subject or theme, such as the Italian Futurism movement in Futurista (1986). As his solo career began to extend outside Japan in the late 1980s, Sakamoto's explorations, influences and collaborators also developed further. Beauty (1989) features a tracklist that combines pop with traditional Japanese and Okinawan songs, as well as guest appearances by Jill Jones, Robert Wyatt, Brian Wilson and Robbie Robertson. Heartbeat (1991) and Sweet Revenge (1994) features Sakamoto's collaborations with a global range of artists.

In 1995 Sakamoto released Smoochy, described by the Sound On Sound website as Sakamoto's "excursion into the land of easy-listening and Latin", followed by the 1996 album, which featured a number of previously released pieces arranged for solo piano, violin and cello. During the December of 1996 Sakamoto, composed the entirety of an hour-long orchestral work entitled "Untitled 01" and released as the album Discord (1998). the recording was condensed from nine live performances of the work, recorded during a Japanese tour. Discord was divided into four parts: "Grief", "Anger", "Prayer" and "Salvation"; Sakamoto explained in 1998 that he was "not religious, but maybe spiritual" and "The Prayer is to anybody or anything you want to name." . Sakamoto's next album, BTTB (1998)—an acronym for "Back to the Basics"—was a fairly opaque reaction to the prior year's multilayered, lushly orchestrated Discord. The album comprised a series of original pieces on solo piano, including "Energy Flow" (a major hit in Japan) and a frenetic, four-hand arrangement of the Yellow Magic Orchestra classic "Tong Poo".

1999 saw the long-awaited release of Sakamoto's "opera" LIFE. It premiered with seven sold-out performances in Tokyo and Osaka. This ambitious multi-genre multi-media project featured contributions by over 100 performers, including Pina Bausch, Bernardo Bertolucci, Josep Carreras, His Holiness The Dalai Lama and Salman Rushdie. Sakamoto teamed with cellist Jaques Morelenbaum (a member of his 1996 trio), and Morelenbaum's wife, Paula, on a pair of albums celebrating the work of bossa nova pioneer Antonio Carlos Jobim. They recorded their first album, Casa (2001).

Sakamoto collaborated with Alva Noto (an alias of Carsten Nicolai) to release Vrioon, an album of Sakamoto's piano clusters treated by Nicolai's unique style of digital manipulation, involving the creation of "micro-loops" and minimal percussion. The two produced this work by passing the pieces back and forth until both were satisfied with the result. This debut, released on German label Raster-Noton, was voted record of the year 2004 in the electronica category by British magazine The Wire. They then released Insen (2005) – while produced in a similar manner to Vrioon, this album is somewhat more restrained and minimalist.

In 2005, Finnish mobile phone manufacturer Nokia hired Sakamoto to compose ring and alert tones for their high-end phone, the Nokia 8800. A recent reunion with YMO pals Hosono and Takahashi also caused a stir in the Japanese press. They released a single "Rescue" in 2007 and a DVD "HAS/YMO" in 2008. On July 10, 2014, Sakamoto released a statement indicating that he had been diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer in late June of the same year. He announced a break from his work while he sought treatment and recovery. On August 3, 2015, Sakamoto posted on his website that he was "in great shape ... I am thinking about returning to work" and announced that he would be providing music for Yoji Yamada's Haha to Kuraseba (Living with My Mother).

Sakamoto is a member of the anti-nuclear organization Stop Rokkasho and has demanded the closing of the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant. In 2012, he organized the "No Nukes 2012" concert, which featured performances by 18 groups, including Yellow Magic Orchestra and Kraftwerk. Sakamoto is also known as a critic of copyright law, arguing in 2009 that it is antiquated in the information age. He argued that in "the last 100 years, only a few organizations have dominated the music world and ripped off both fans and creators" and that "with the internet we are going back to having tribal attitudes towards music."

In 2006 Sakamoto, in collaboration with Japan's largest independent music company Avex Group, founded Commmons, a record label seeking to change the manner in which music is produced. Sakamoto has explained that Commmons is not his label, but is a platform for all aspiring artists to join as equal collaborators, to share the benefits of the music industry. On the initiative's "About" page, the label is described as a project that "aims to find new possibilities for music, while making meaningful contribution to culture and society." The name "Commmons" is spelt with three "m"s because the third "m" stands for music. From 2013 until now 5 albums have been releasesd 3 with Nobuyuki Nakajima and 2 with Taylor Deupree

Since 78 Sakamoto has released almost 100 albums (solo & soundtrack) , on top of that 2 dozen collaboration albums and YMO 33 years 110+ albums , every 16 weeks an album for 33 years, amazing workethic, puts lots of artists to shame. Married life obviously suffered and he has been unattached for most of his career, still he has two daughters one of which has stepped into her parents career (mother=Akiko Yano), the J-pop singer Miu Sakamoto.

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If only homo sapiens could evolve beyond their tribal mentality. If only we could follow the sixth commandment and stop killing our own species. If only Christians could be free of the lunacy of the anti-Christian book of 'Revelation'. (Who allowed that paganist, divisive hallucination into the New Testament?!) If only we could all be World Citizens.... The two variations on Sylvian's lyrical theme of 'world citizen' are beautiful must-have songs for anyone who can see and dream beyond the madness.

An excellent collaboration, well written, arranged and produced and can be played over and over. Here a Russian Import with 10 tracks including older collaborations from these two artists. David Sylvian does an amazing job on this, for the listener. 'World Citizen', with its powerful lyrics and excellent melody, is a must have for all Sylvian and Sakamoto fans.



Ryuichi Sakamoto & David Sylvian - World Citizen (flac 397mb)

01 World Citizen (Short Version) 4:06
02 World Citizen - I Won't Be Disappointed (Short Version) 4:08
03 World Citizen (Long Version) 6:43
04 World Citizen - I Won't Be Disappointed (Long Version) 6:17
05 World Citizen (Ryoji Ikeda Remix) 4:59
Bonus Tracks
06 Forbidden Colours 4:49
07 The Scent Of Magnolia 5:36
08 Heartbeat (Tainai Kaiki II) 5:17
09 Ride (David Sylvian) 8:00
10 The Boy With The Gun (David Sylvian) 5:15
SuperBonus Tracks
11 Bamboo Houses 5:28
12 Bamboo Music 5:40

Ryuichi Sakamoto & David Sylvian - World Citizen  (ogg 167mb)

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The title "Summvs" refers to the latin word "summa" (eng. sum) and "versus" (eng. towards) serving as a metaphor for the work being oriented towards a collaborative whole. Recorded at Onkio Haus (Tokyo, Japan), Victor Studio (Tokyo, Japan) and Hansa Studios (Berlin, Germany).

The duo's latest opus starts with 'Microon I', a minimalist, quasi-monotone sliding around in suspended notes, between majors and minors, with a central drone of thickened, molten notes that bring to mind Zadik Zechariah's Kurdish zorna melodies and the opaque patterns a piano tuner follows to righten the slippages of time-worn keys. The tracks that follow, like the 'Microon' trilogy, which serves as crucial punctuation to the album, lend it a sombre abstraction, with deep pulses, great expanses of filtered white noise and parsimonious, fragmentary piano and digital interference. Other tracks, such as 'By This River' and its counterpart 'By This River – Phantom', introduce something lighter, albeit as ever slowed down and deconstructed, a pair of erudite studies on the melodious, beat-driven strand of electronica. This last track unravels until it is returned, in its final stretches, to the radical, pared down landscape of the duo's first outing – 'Vrioon'. A barely perceptible yet unmistakable beat, single chords played with capacious reverb and impeccable precision – a simplicity of form that slows your very heartbeat as you listen, drawing you in as if into deepest slumber. This economy of means – though by now a familiar trademark of what happens when these two inimitable musicians join hands – remains astonishing and undiluted in its potency.



Alva Noto + Ryuichi Sakamoto - Summvs (flac 216mb)

01 Microon I 3:00
02 Reverso 6:57
03 Halo 7:10
04 Microon II 2:38
05 Pionier IOO 5:46
06 Ionoscan 4:08
07 By This River 4:08
08 Naono 11:20
09 Microon III 3:00
10 By This River - Phantom 8:03

Alva Noto + Ryuichi Sakamoto - Summvs  (ogg   116mb)

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The third collaborative album from Christian Fennesz and Ryuichi Sakamoto, following on from 'Sala Santa Cecilia' and 'Cendre', in the canon of piano-based compositions from the Touch imprint.. The concept behind the album is fairly straightforward: on each night of a 24-date tour, Sakamoto wrote and performed a piano piece in a different key. By tour's end, he'd explored every possible tonal variation within Western notation. He provided these short, jewel-like solo piano melodies to Fennesz, who laid them in soft beds of gently caressing electronics. The results are very pretty...but they're not much more than that. Despite the key changes from track to track, the two discs retain a single mood from beginning to end. Each piece feels like it should be playing over the end credits of an indie filmn, it seems designed to hover in the background.



Fennesz & Sakamoto - Flumina I+II  (flac 558mb)

101 0318 4:27
102 0319 5:40
103 0320 4:43
104 0322 5:35
105 0324 6:49
106 0325 4:20
107 0327 5:30
108 0328 5:30
109 0330 4:44
110 0401 4:55
111 0402 6:15
112 0404 4:34

201 0405 4:51
202 0407 4:38
203 0409 4:53
204 0411 5:23
205 0415 5:14
206 0417 3:44
207 0419 5:00
208 0423 5:17
209 0424 4:28
210 0425 6:56
211 0428 4:55
212 0429 5:58

Fennesz & Sakamoto - Flumina I+II   (ogg 248mb)

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Aug 22, 2015

RhoDeo 1533 Grooves

Hello, just mentioning re-up requests are still welcome

Today a band from San Francisco, active from 1967 to 1983, the band was pivotal in the development of soul, funk, and psychedelic music. Headed by singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist Sly Stone, and containing several of his family members and friends, the band was the first major American rock band to have an "integrated, multi-gender" lineup.  ... N'joy

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Sly & the Family Stone harnessed all of the disparate musical and social trends of the late '60s, creating a wild, brilliant fusion of soul, rock, R&B, psychedelia, and funk that broke boundaries down without a second thought. Led by Sly Stone, the Family Stone was comprised of men and women, and blacks and whites, making the band the first fully integrated group in rock's history. That integration shone through the music, as well as the group's message. Before Stone, very few soul and R&B groups delved into political and social commentary; after him, it became a tradition in soul, funk, and hip-hop. And, along with James Brown, Stone brought hard funk into the mainstream. the Family Stone's arrangements were ingenious, filled with unexpected group vocals, syncopated rhythms, punchy horns, and pop melodies. Their music was joyous, but as the '60s ended, so did the good times. Stone became disillusioned with the ideals he had been preaching in his music, becoming addicted to a variety of drugs in the process. His music gradually grew slower and darker, culminating in 1971's There's a Riot Going On, which set the pace for '70s funk with its elastic bass, slurred vocals, and militant Black Power stance. Stone was able to turn out one more modern funk classic, 1973's Fresh, before slowly succumbing to his addictions, which gradually sapped him of his once prodigious talents. Nevertheless, his music continued to provide the basic template for urban soul, funk, and even hip-hop well into the '90s.

Sly Stone (born Sylvester Stewart, March 15, 1944) and his family moved from his home state of Texas to San Francisco in the '50s. He had already begun to express an interest in music, and when he was 16, he had a regional hit with "Long Time Away." Stone studied music composition, theory, and trumpet at Vallejo Junior College in the early '60s; simultaneously, he began playing in several groups on the Bay Area scene, often with his brother Fred. Soon, he had become a disc jockey at the R&B station KSOL, later switching to KDIA. The radio appearances led to a job producing records for Autumn Records. While at Autumn, he worked with a number of San Franciscan garage and psychedelic bands, including the Beau Brummels, the Great Society, Bobby Freeman, and the Mojo Men.

During 1966, Stone formed the Stoners, which featured trumpeter Cynthia Robinson. Though the Stoners didn't last long, he brought Robinson along as one of the core members of his next group, Sly & the Family Stone. Formed in early 1967, the Family Stone also featured Fred Stewart (guitar, vocals), Larry Graham, Jr. (bass, vocals), Greg Errico (drums), Jerry Martini (saxophone), and Rosie Stone (piano), who all were of different racial backgrounds. The group's eclectic music and multiracial composition made them distinctive from the numerous flower-power bands in San Francisco, and their first single, "I Ain't Got Nobody," became a regional hit for the local label Loadstone. The band signed with Epic Records shortly afterward, releasing their debut album, A Whole New Thing, by the end of the year. The record stiffed, but the follow-up, Dance to the Music, generated a Top Ten pop and R&B hit with its title track early in 1968. Life followed later in 1968, but the record failed to capitalize on its predecessor's success. "Everyday People," released late in 1968, turned their fortunes back around, rocketing to the top of the pop and R&B charts and setting the stage for the breakthrough success of 1969's Stand!

Featuring "Everyday People," "Sing a Simple Song," "Stand," and "I Want to Take You Higher," Stand! became the Family Stone's first genuine hit album, climbing to number 13 and spending over 100 weeks on the charts. Stand! also marked the emergence of the political bent in Stone's songwriting ("Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey"), as well as the development of hard-edged, improvisational funk like "Sex Machine." the Family Stone quickly became known as one of the best live bands of the late '60s, and their performance at Woodstock was widely hailed as one of the festival's best. The non-LP singles "Hot Fun in the Summertime" and "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)" b/w "Everybody Is a Star" became hits, reaching number two and number one respectively in late 1969/early 1970. Both singles were included on Greatest Hits, which became a number two record upon its fall 1970 release. While the group was at the height of its popularity, Sly was beginning to unravel behind the scenes. Developing a debilitating addiction to narcotics, Stone soon became notorious for arriving late for concerts, frequently missing the shows all together.

Stone's growing personal problems, as well as his dismay with the slow death of the civil rights movement and other political causes, surfaced on There's a Riot Goin' On. Though the album shot to number one upon its fall 1971 release, the record -- including "Family Affair," Stone's last number one single -- was dark, hazy, and paranoid, and his audience began to shrink slightly. During 1972, several key members of the Family Stone, including Graham and Errico, left the band; they were replaced by Rusty Allen and Andy Newmark, respectively. The relatively lighter Fresh appeared in the summer of 1973, and it went into the Top Ten on the strength of the Top Ten R&B hit "If You Want Me to Stay." Released the following year, Small Talk was a moderate hit, reaching number 15 on the charts and going gold, but it failed to generate a big hit single. High on You, released in late 1975 and credited only to Sly Stone, confirmed that his power and popularity had faded. "I Get High on You" reached the R&B Top Ten, but the album made no lasting impact.

Disco had overtaken funk in terms of popularity, and even if Sly wanted to compete with disco, he wasn't in shape to make music. He had become addicted to cocaine, his health was frequently poor, and he was often in trouble with the law. His recordings had slowed to a trickle, and Epic decided to close out his contract in 1979 with Ten Years Too Soon, a compilation of previously released material that had the original funky rhythm tracks replaced with disco beats. Stone signed with Warner Brothers that same year, crafting the comeback effort Back on the Right Track with several original members of the Family Stone, but the record was critically panned and a commercial failure. In light of the album's lack of success, Stone retreated even further, eventually joining forces with George Clinton on Funkadelic's 1981 album The Electric Spanking of War Babies. Following the album's release, Stone toured with Clinton's P-Funk All-Stars, which led him to embark on his own tour, as well as a stint with Bobby Womack. The culmination of this burst of activity was 1983's Ain't but the One Way, an album that was ignored. Later that year, Stone was arrested for cocaine possession; the following year, he entered rehab.

Stone appeared on Jesse Johnson's 1986 R&B hit "Crazay." The following year, he dueted with Martha Davis on "Love & Affection" for the Soul Man soundtrack; he also he recorded "Eek-a-Bo-Static," a single that didn't chart. Stone was arrested and imprisoned for cocaine possession by the end of 1987, and he was never able to recover from the final arrest. Stone continued to battle his addiction, with varying degrees of success. By his 1993 induction to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, he had disappeared from public view. Avenue Records gave Stone a recording contract in 1995, but nothing would be recorded.

A Sly and the Family Stone tribute took place at the 2006 Grammy Awards on February 8, 2006. The original plan, to have been a surprise for audiences, was to feature a reunion performance by the original Sly and the Family Stone lineup as the highlight of the tribute. That sadly ended in chaos. The band did do a decent show at North Sea Jazz in 2007

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Sly & the Family Stone's debut album is more restrained and not nearly as funky or psychedelic as their subsequent efforts, owing far more to traditional soul arrangements. These aren't that traditional, though; Sly is already using goofier and/or more thoughtful lyrics than the soul norm, and taking some cues from rock in his adventurous and unexpected song construction. The Family Stone, similarly, aren't as innovative as they would shortly become, but are already a tight unit, particularly in the interplay between lead and backup vocals and the sharp horn riffs.



Sly and The Family Stone - A Whole New Thing (flac 311mb)

01 Underdog 3:59
02 If This Room Could Talk 3:14
03 Run, Run, Run 3:07
04 Turn Me Loose 1:57
05 Let Me Hear It From You 3:36
06 Advice 2:23
07 I Cannot Make It 3:21
08 Trip To Your Heart 3:44
09 I Hate To Love Her 3:33
10 Bad Risk 3:06
11 That Kind Of Person 4:28
12 Dog 3:07
Bonus Tracks
13 Underdog (Single Version In Mono) 3:06
14 Let Me Hear It From You (Single Version In Mono) 3:30
15 Only One Way Out Of This Mess 3:53
16 What Would I Do 4:07
17 You Better Help Yourself (Instrumental) 2:19

Sly and The Family Stone - A Whole New Thing (ogg  119mb)

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Sly & the Family Stone came into their own with their second album, Dance to the Music. This is exuberant music, bursting with joy and invention. If there's a shortage of classic material, with only the title track being a genuine classic, that winds up being nearly incidental, since it's so easy to get sucked into the freewheeling spirit and cavalier virtuosity of the group. Consider this -- prior to this record no one, not even the Family Stone, treated soul as a psychedelic sun splash, filled with bright melodies, kaleidoscopic arrangements, inextricably intertwined interplay, and deft, fast rhythms. Yes, they wound up turning "Higher" into the better "I Want to Take You Higher" and they recycle the title track in the long jam "Dance to the Medley," but there's such imagination to this jam that the similarities fade as they play. And, if these are just vamps, well, so are James Brown's records, and those didn't have the vitality or friendliness of this. Not a perfect record, but a fine one all the same.



Sly and The Family Stone - Dance To The Music (flac 340mb)

01 Dance To The Music 2:59
02 Higher 2:47
03 I Ain't Got Nobody (For Real) 4:25
04 Dance To The Medley 12:11
0a Music Is Alive
0b Dance In
0c Music Lover
05 Ride The Rhythm 2:47
06 Color Me True 3:08
07 Are You Ready 2:49
08 Don't Burn Baby 3:13
09 I'll Never Fall In Love Again 3:24
Bonus Tracks
10 Dance To The Music (Single Version In Mono) 2:57
11 Higher (Unissued Single Version In Mono) 2:53
12 Soul Clappin' 2:38
13 We Love All 4:30
14 I Can't Turn You Loose 3:33
15 Never Do Your Woman Wrong (Instrumental) 3:33

Sly and The Family Stone - Dance To The Music (ogg 134mb)

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Just a matter of months after Dance to the Music, Sly & the Family Stone turned around and delivered Life, a record that leapfrogged over its predecessor in terms of accomplishment and achievement. The most noteworthy difference is the heavier reliance on psychedelics and fuzz guitars, plus a sharpening of songcraft that extends to even throwaways like "Chicken." As it turned out, Life didn't have any hits -- the double A-sided single "Life"/"M'Lady" barely cracked the Top 100 -- yet this feels considerably more song-oriented than its predecessor, as each track is a concise slice of tightly wound dance-funk. All the more impressive is that the group is able to strut their stuff within this context, trading off vocals and blending into an unstoppable force where it's impossible to separate the instruments, even as they solo. The songwriting might still be perfunctory or derivative in spots -- listen to how they appropriate "Eleanor Rigby" on "Plastic Jim" -- but what's impressive is how even the borrowed or recycled moments sound fresh in context. And then there are the cuts that work on their own, whether it's the aforementioned double-sided single, "Fun," "Dynamite!," or several other cuts here -- these are brilliant, intoxicating slices of funk-pop that get by as much on sound as song, and they're hard to resist.



 Sly and The Family Stone - Life (flac  259mb)

01 Dynamite! 2:43
02 Chicken 2:13
03 Plastic Jim 3:29
04 Fun 2:21
05 Into My Own Thing 2:13
06 Harmony 2:50
07 Life 3:00
08 Love City 2:42
09 I'm An Animal 3:20
10 M'Lady 2:44
11 Jane Is A Groupee 2:49
Bonus Tracks
12 Dynamite! (Single Version Mono) 2:07
13 Seven More Days 3:24
14 Pressure 3:44
15 Sorrow (Instrumental) 3:19

 Sly and The Family Stone - Life (ogg  102mb)

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