Jul 30, 2015

RhoDeo 1530 Goldy Rhox 220

Hello, today the 220th post of Goldy Rhox, classic pop rock. In the darklight an English singer (9 October 1940 – 8 December 1980) and songwriter who rose to worldwide fame as a co-founder of the band the Beatles, the most commercially successful band in the history of popular music. With Paul McCartney, he formed a celebrated songwriting partnership. Born and raised in Liverpool, as a teenager he became involved in the skiffle craze; his first band, the Quarrymen, evolved into the Beatles in 1960. When the group disbanded in 1970, our mystery man embarked on a solo career that produced the critically acclaimed albums with the Plastic Ono Band and Imagine, and iconic songs such as "Give Peace a Chance" and "Working Class Hero". Our man disengaged himself from the music business in 1975 to raise his infant son Sean, but re-emerged with Ono in 1980 with the new album Double Fantasy. He was murdered three weeks after its release.

As of 2012, our mystery man's solo album sales in the United States exceeded 14 million and, as writer, co-writer, or performer, he is responsible for 25 number-one singles on the US Hot 100 chart. In 2002, a BBC poll on the 100 Greatest Britons voted him eighth and, in 2008, Rolling Stone ranked him the fifth-greatest singer of all time. He was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1987 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice; as a member of the Beatles in 1988 and as a solo artist in 1994.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.



Today's mystery album is the is the sixth studio album by today's mystery artist. Released in 1975, it is an album of late 1950s and early 1960s songs as covered by today's mystery artist. Recording the album was problematic and spanned an entire year: Phil Spector produced sessions in October 1973 at A&M Studios, and the mystery artist produced sessions in October 1974 at Record Plant Studios (East). At the time he was being sued by Morris Levy over copyright infringement of one line in his song "Come Together". As part of an agreement, he had to include three Levy-owned songs on Rock 'n' Roll. Spector ran away with the session recordings, later being involved in a motor accident, which left the album's tracks unrecoverable until the beginning of the Walls and Bridges sessions. With Walls and Bridges coming out first, featuring one Levy-owned song, Levy sued our mystery artist expecting to see his mystery album.

The album was released in February 1975, reaching number 6 in both the United Kingdom and the United States, later being certified gold in both countries. It was supported by the single "Stand by Me", which peaked at number 20 in the US, and 30 in the UK. The cover was taken by J├╝rgen Vollmer during the Beatles' stay in Hamburg. It was his last album until 1980: With no recording contract obligation, he took a hiatus from recording to raise his son Sean.  Here today the 2004 expanded and remixed/remastered version... N'Joy


Goldy Rhox 220   (flac 362mb)

Goldy Rhox 220    (ogg 129mb)


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Jul 29, 2015

RhoDeo 1530 Aetix

Hello,

Today an American rockabilly band formed in 1979 by guitarist and vocalist Brian Setzer, double bassist Lee Rocker, and drummer Slim Jim Phantom in the Long Island town of Massapequa, New York. The group, whose style was based upon the sounds of Sun Records artists and other artists from the 1950s, were heavily influenced by Eddie Cochran, Carl Perkins, Gene Vincent and Bill Haley & His Comets.The group had numerous hit singles in the UK, Australia, Canada and the U.S.     .....N'Joy

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The key group of the early-'80s rockabilly revival, the Stray Cats scored several big hits on both sides of the Atlantic thanks to a striking visual style tailor-made for the early days of MTV, as well as genuine musical chops that evoked the best players of rockabilly's original heyday. the Stray Cats were formed by guitarist/vocalist Brian Setzer in the Long Island town of Massapequa, NY, in 1979. At first, Setzer played rockabilly covers in a band called the Tom Cats with his brother, drummer Gary, and bassist Bob Beecher; however, Setzer soon abandoned that group to join up with newly rechristened school friends Lee Rocker (born Leon Drucker) and Slim Jim Phantom (born James McDonnell). However, their retro '50s look and sound didn't go over well around Long Island, and in the summer of 1980, the group headed to England, where a rockabilly revival movement was just beginning to emerge.

After one of their gigs in London, the Stray Cats met producer Dave Edmunds, well known as a roots rock enthusiast for his work with Rockpile, and as a solo artist. Edmunds offered to work with the group, and they entered the studio to record their self-titled debut album, released in England in 1981 on Arista. They were popular right out of the box, scoring three straight hits that year with "Runaway Boys," "Rock This Town," and "Stray Cat Strut." The follow-up, Gonna Ball, wasn't as well received and, stung by the negative reviews, the Stray Cats decided to return to the States and make a go of it. They signed with EMI America and in 1982 released their U.S. debut, Built for Speed, which compiled the highlights from their two British LPs. Helped by extensive airplay on MTV at the height of the anything-goes new wave era, "Rock This Town" and "Stray Cat Strut" both hit the American Top Ten, over a year after their British chart peaks. As a result, Built for Speed was a left-field smash, and the Stray Cats were seen as avatars of retro style. Their second American album, Rant n' Rave with the Stray Cats, appeared in 1983 and produced another Top Ten hit in "(She's) Sexy + 17," as well as a minor Top 40 entry in the doo wop-styled ballad "I Won't Stand in Your Way."

Personality conflicts began to emerge in the ways the individual members handled their newfound success: Phantom married actress (and former Rod Stewart paramour) Britt Ekland, while Setzer made guest appearances with stars like Bob Dylan and Stevie Nicks and became the concert guitarist for Robert Plant's Honeydrippers side project. In late 1984, Setzer broke up the band amid much bad blood. Rocker and Phantom immediately teamed up with guitarist Earl Slick and recorded an album as Phantom, Rocker & Slick, while Setzer waited a couple of years before releasing his roots rock solo debut, The Knife Feels Like Justice. By 1986, fences had apparently been mended enough for the Stray Cats to reconvene in Los Angeles and record the covers-heavy Rock Therapy, which didn't sell that well. The trio returned to their respective post-Stray Cats projects, which both released albums that performed disappointingly. In 1989, they reunited once again for the album Blast Off, which was accompanied by a tour with Stevie Ray Vaughan. No longer with EMI, the Cats entered the studio with Nile Rodgers for the lackluster Let's Go Faster, issued by Liberation in 1990. 1992's Dave Edmunds-produced Choo Choo Hot Fish also attracted little attention, and after another covers album, Original Cool, the group called it quits again. They have since reunited periodically for live performances. Setzer, of course, went on to spearhead the '90s swing revival with his Brian Setzer Orchestra, which performed classic big-band swing and jump blues tunes, as well as Setzer originals.


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Stray Cats debut album came hot on the heels of the two hit singles "Runaway Boys" and "Rock This Town," both energy filled rockabilly songs that hearkened back to the 1950s era of pure rock & roll with an updated, clean '80s sound highlighted by the prominent double bass playing of Lee Rocker and drumming of Slim Jim Phantom. The Stray Cats had more depth than pure rockabilly, as shown on the out and out rock & roll tracks "Fishnet Stockings," "Double Talkin Baby," and "Jeanie, Jeanie, Jeanie" (a facsimile of "Summertime Blues"), and the sleazy third single "Stray Cat Strut," perfectly evocative of a night out on the tiles. "Storm the Embassy," a song about the Iranian hostage situation than ran throughout 1980, would not have sounded out of place performed by the Clash, and "Ubangi Stomp" bore more than a passing resemblance to another musical craze of the early '80s: ska as performed by Madness or any of the 2 Tone stable of acts. This album was by far their most successful, hitting number six in the charts and their only entry into the Top 40. It was never released in the U.S., but five tracks, the three singles, plus "Rumble in Brighton" and "Jeanie Jeanie Jeanie" were amalgamated with tracks from the follow-up, Gonna Ball and appeared on the U.S. compilation Built for Speed.



Stray Cats - Stray Cats  (flac 249mb)

01 Runaway Boys 2:59
02 Fishnet Stockings 2:24
03 Ubangi Stomp 3:10
04 Jeanie,Jeanie,Jeanie 2:17
05 Storm The Embassy 4:06
06 Rock This Town 3:24
07 Rumble In Brighton 3:11
08 Stray Cat Strut 3:14
09 Crawl Up And Die 3:11
10 Double Talkin Baby 3:02
11 My One Desire 2:55
12 Wild Saxaphone 3:00

Stray Cats - Stray Cats  (ogg 85mb)

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The Stray Cats' second album, Gonna Ball, was considered something of a disappointment when it was released in 1981; back then, it had the disadvantage of competing with the expectations raised by its immediate predecessor, a miraculous debut produced under the guidance of Dave Edmunds. When they pulled up stakes in England and returned to the U.S.A., they signed with EMI-America and built their American debut around what the band considered the best songs off of their first two records -- as a result, neither U.K. album was widely heard intact on American shores. Heard on its own terms 23 years later, Gonna Ball seems like a minor masterpiece, capturing the group going deep into early rock & roll and even pre-rock & roll roots music and far beyond the boundaries of rockabilly, supported by various players, including Rolling Stones alumnus Ian Stewart. Their rendition of Johnny Burnette's "Baby Blue Eyes" was a bracing opener (later moved to the closing spot on their third album). Brian Setzer's "Cryin' Shame" included a killer extended jam and harmonica showcase, and the Lee Rocker/Slim Jim Phantom-authored "(She'll Stay Just) One More Day" was a sophisticated piece of jump blues with a beautiful sax solo at its center and powerful central riff; Setzer's "What's Goin' Down (Cross That Bridge)," in turn, was as fine a Bo Diddley tribute as had been done by any white artist since the 1960s -- and none of those three made it on to their American debut LP. Setzer's "You Don't Believe Me" oozed the spirit of Elmore James out of every guitar note, while "Gonna Ball" and "Wicked Whisky" were exercises in rockabilly primitivism. "Rev It Up and Go" -- which made it to the third album -- was an impassioned Chuck Berry homage that also obliquely acknowledged the Beach Boys' service in making his riffs work in a uniquely white suburban context. "Lonely Summer Nights" -- also on the third album -- proved that this band could handle the ballad side of '50s music with the best of them when they wanted to. And "Crazy Mixed Up Kids" (which didn't make the cut to album number three) was a psychobilly instrumental workout par excellence.



Stray Cats - Gonna Ball  (flac 250mb)

01 Baby Blue Eyes 2:49
02 Little Miss Prissy 3:01
03 Wasn't That Good 2:45
04 Cryin' Shame 3:30
05 (She'll Stay Just) One More Day 3:42
06 You Don't Believe Me 2:58
07 Gonna Ball 3:15
08 Wicked Whisky 2:17
09 Rev It Up & Go 2:28
10 Lonely Summer Nights 3:21
11 Crazy Mixed-Up Kid 2:40

 Stray Cats - Gonna Ball (ogg  89mb )

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The third album from the New York Rockabilly trio was one of the most anticipated albums of 1983. The Cats stood out in the midst of the New Romantic wave of Spandau Ballet, Visage, Duran Duran, Kajagoogoo and others at the time as one band who had toured incessantly and recorded as fast as they could. The band reunited with Welshman Dave Edmunds to record "Rant & rave" in London. They opted to return to what made their success and went back to their rockabilly roots (with an exception or two) after the blues inspired "Gonna Ball".
"Rebels Rule" is a good choice to start the selection. A strong Diddley Beat with Slim Jim playing like a madman on his toms and Setzer yelling "Rock'n'Roll is never too loud!" the pace is quickly set. The Stray Cats are back ! The next one, "Too Hip Gotta Go" is a good rockabilly and shows Setzer ability on the strings. A fun one to play (see the time Setzer takes to explain it on his instructional video) it'll remain in their live set list for very long. "Look At That Cadillac" is a fine jump blues with juicy saxes and piano.

 "Hot Rod Gang" was undoubtedly written with Gene Vincent in mind feature a fine Cliff Gallup influenced solo. The album ends with "How Long You Wanna Live Anyway?" the closest thing to Psychobilly the Stray Cats ever played with heavy guitar and pounding drums. With 10 songs and not a weak track, the Stray Cats star was rising high. Sadly one year after the release of Rant & Rave the band disbanded and though they made different come-back with some solid songs and albums this is the end of the golden age of the Stray Cats.



Stray Cats - Rant N' Rave With The Stray Cats  (flac 262mb)

01 Rebels Rule 3:24
02 Too Hip, Gotta Go 2:33
03 Look At That Cadillac 4:00
04 Something's Wrong With My Radio 2:34
05 18 Miles To Memphis 2:56
06 (She's) Sexy And 17 3:28
07 Dig Dirty Doggy 1:59
08 I Won't Stand In Your Way 3:55
09 Hotrod Gang 2:45
10 How Long You Wanna Live, Anyway? 2:39

Stray Cats - Rant N' Rave With The Stray Cats   (ogg 93mb)

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Jul 28, 2015

RhoDeo !530 Re-Ups 25

Hello, it was time i posted some re-ups again, interestingly i havent seen that much requests either....


Storage maybe dirt cheap these days -compared to 5 years ago, but the hosts are much more money orientated and look at turnover and notice that keeping data longer than 1 month isn't making them money. Thus the coming months i'm making an effort to re-up, it will satisfy a small number of people which means its likely the update will  expire relativly quickly again as its interest that keeps it live. Nevertheless here's your chance ... asks for re-up in the comments section prefarbly at the page where the expired link resides....requests are satisfied on a first come first go basis. As my back up ogg hard disk is nonresponsive currently, i most likely will post a flac instead~for the the pre medio 2011 posts~ but i would think that is not really a problem...updates will be posted here and yes sign a name to your request and please do it from the page where the link died!

Looka here another batch of re-ups ...N' Joy

three solo re-re up

The Higher Intelligence Agency Meets Deep Space Network

Underground Resistance - Revolution For Change

Joe's Garage I,II n III


3x The Cramps (A date With Elvis, Off The Bone, Stay Sick)

3x Aswad ( Aswad, Showcase, Live n Direct)


3x Laurie Anderson (Big Science, Mr Heartbreak, Strange Angels)


7x Wavetrain Sheffield Sons NOW in Flac(The Future & The Human League - The Golden Hour Of The Future, Human League - Travelogue, Heaven 17 - Endless, Clock DVA - Thirst, Cabaret Voltaire - Drinking Gasoline, Crackdown EP ) Back In Ogg ( Hula - Cut From Inside, In The Nursery - Koda)

Sorry for those that uploaded Cabaret Voltaire , i've upgraded the file to fully flac now !

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Jul 27, 2015

RhoDeo 1530 Sword of Orion 4

Hello, so Froompy won the Tour, in the end he 'won it' in the first stage a wind swept happening thru the lowlands, no2 Quintana lost more time there then the 1m12 he came up short 84 hours and 46 minutes he cruised around France, no last S.Chavanel was not even 5 hours later. Most entertaining rider without a doubt Peter Sagan who picked up the green jersey along the way without winning a single stage-that was Greipel's domain. Meanwhile F1 had one its more spectacular races The Ferrari's took the lead at the start passing the Mercs, Vettel said thank you and never looked back, behind him plenty of chaos Hamilton, Ricciardo and several usual suspects from the back of the field caused plenty of chaos, close to the end Rosberg made a stupid move which lost him his second place and defacto 13 points, Kvyat took second before his team mate Ricciardo. 4th scoring his first double figure points was rookie Verstappen, alas not much chance this result will repeat in 4 weeks time in Spa as there the merc engine cars have a big advantage -lots of straightline speed. Ah yes for the dart fans Michael van Gerwen won the world matchplay trofee...




Today the conclusion of, Sword of Orion  a Big Finish Productions audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. This audio drama was broadcast on BBC 7 in four weekly parts starting from 3 September 2005, and was repeated in 2006.

ps if you missed part one there's the description at the bottom of the page as well as a downloadlink

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Sword of Orion was the seventeenth monthly Doctor Who audio story produced by Big Finish Productions. This was a double first, being the first Big Finish story to feature the Cybermen, and the first Eighth Doctor story to feature the Cybermen. This is also another of Big Finish's stories which was originally created as part of the Audio Visuals, a fan produced series which featured many people who went onto create and work for Big Finish and BBV Productions. Nicholas Briggs filled many roles in the production of this story — he provided the voice of the Cybermen, sound design, music, direction, and writing; his appearance as the voice of the Cybermen here predates TV: Rise of the Cybermen. This story also established the Orion War which would be built upon years later in Big Finish's spin-off series, Cyberman

The human race is locked in deadly combat with the "Android Hordes" in the Orion System. Light years from the front line, the Eighth Doctor and Charley arrive to sample the dubious delights of a galactic backwater, little suspecting that the consequences of the Orion War might reach them there. But High Command's lust for victory knows no bounds. Trapped aboard a mysterious, derelict star destroyer, the Doctor and Charley find themselves facing summary execution. But this is only the beginning of their troubles. The real danger has yet to awaken. Until, somewhere in the dark recesses of the Garazone System, the Cybermen receive the signal for reactivation...


Cast
The Doctor — Paul McGann
Charley Pollard — India Fisher
Thinnes — Mark Gatiss
Digly — Barnaby Edwards
Ike — Ian Marr
Grash — Bruce Montague
Vol — Hylton Collins
Deeva Jansen — Michelle Livingstone
Chev — Helen Goldwyn
Kelsey — Toby Longworth
Cybermen — Nicholas Briggs, Alistair Lock



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Dr. Who - Sword of Orion 4 (mp3  26mb)

01 Sword of Orion 4      28:36


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previously

Charley is worried about Ramsay looking ill. She and the Doctor can't carry him to the control room and Ramsay is dying from being away too long from the time vortex. The Doctor decides that there is one way to restore Ramsay back to health, but doesn’t tell Charley, who is flustered to know.

2503. The Orion War continues to rage and a ship called the Silver Jackal receives contact from a patrol ship. Onboard the Silver Jackal, Digly convinces the patrol ship to leave so they can salvage an area in space. Digly wakes up Captain Thinnes and then picks up something on radar—an abandoned star destroyer. Captain Thinnes decides to go onboard the star destroyer to investigate and find “souvenirs”.

Captain Thinnes and Digly don their spacesuits and enter the star destroyer. They sense a foul stench onboard, but before they continue, something heads towards them. They open fire, but it is not harmed. They retreat, but they are killed by the figure.

The TARDIS lands in a bazaar on the Garazone Central. Charley tries to communicate with a merchant to get help for Ramsay, but Charley is slightly disturbed by the merchant’s suggestive compliments to her. She gives up and meets up with the Doctor, who also hasn’t found anything. The Doctor and Charley then check out another shop in the bazaar and decide to look around. The Doctor convinces the shopkeeper, Ike, that they are Customs and Excise officials so they can browse peacefully and the Doctor comes across a recorder. The Doctor and Charley then find a golden plated Cyberman head in the shop and the Doctor recognizes it.

Outside, Ike contacts a man named Grash and Ike expresses concern about the disappearances of Thinnes and Digly as well as the Silver Jackal. Grash orders him to calm down, but Ike thinks that his shop is about to be “rumbled” by two individuals. Grash then tells Ike that Captain Obermann has been transferred to the Vanguard. And a new captain has been brought onboard and brought forward the disembarkation time. Grash urgently tells Ike to leave the shop and get to the docking bay immediately.

Back in the shop, Charley asks the Doctor the length of the Cyber-War. The Doctor answers that it was a very long time and informs her that the Cybermen remain in their tombs on Telos for the time being. The Doctor and Charley then notice that Ike has abandoned them. Charley thinks that he has gone to get his “smuggler friends” to beat them to a pulp, but the Doctor disagrees. Charley reminds the Doctor that he told Ike where the TARDIS was and confirms that the Doctor is indeed worried. The Doctor orders Charley to take a grav-pad and the nearby book of ancient remedies. Charley protests that this would be theft, but the Doctor remarks that it’s probably stolen anyway and they run from the shop.

A man named Vol contacts the Vanguard captain from the docking bay. The Captain asks for the status of the supplies. Vol answers that they are in place, but he has to check each of them. The Captain responds that this would take too long and they are to load them immediately, disobeying procedures.

The Doctor and Charley activate the grav-pads, which excite Charley and head to the warehouse, where the TARDIS is parked. They then spot the TARDIS being loaded onto the Vanguard as cargo. Charley sees that the cargo number is 38B. The Doctor then tells Charley that they have less than ten minutes to get onboard before it takes off. Ike arrives onboard and Captain Jensen orders Vol to blast them off. The Vanguard leaves the docking bay.

It is then revealed that the Doctor and Charley were successful in stowing away onboard thanks to the Sonic Screwdriver. They then begin to search for the TARDIS in the cargo area for 38B. Charley feels a vibration on the wall and the Doctor confirms that this is from some sort of interstellar drive for ship that is moving really fast. The Doctor sees that the Vanguard is a scrap ship and wonders why they are in such a hurry. Charley sees that they are now in 38A, but then hear a noise that indicates that there may be something wrong with the engines.

On the bridge, a proximity alarm sounds and Vol then orders Ike to cut the power on the engines. The engines die just when Charley finds 38B, but the Doctor remarks that they better get off the ship because cutting off the engines in midflight of this ship is dangerous

The Vanguard then picks up on radar that they have come across an abandoned star destroyer. Captain Jensen orders a maneuver, but the engines have been cut off. Jensen reluctantly orders to initiate the hyperdrive. Ike and Vol protest that they just cut the engine off and that restarted would be dangerous and would also take time to power up again. Jensen insists her orders.

The Doctor and Charley come across the TARDIS and enter. The Doctor runs to the console and patches the TARDIS’ scanner to visual transmission of the Vanguard, meaning that from the TARDIS, they’ll be able to see what the Vanguard sees. They then see that there is a cold-looking star destroyer in front of the Vanguard. Charley sees that the star destroyer is moving towards them, but the Doctor sees that rather the Vanguard is moving towards it. The Doctor rushes the controls and decides it’s time to go. The TARDIS then stops suddenly. The Doctor then sees that the TARDIS has been caught in the Vanguard’s warp field, preventing them from travelling away. Ramsey would feel better from the temporal time feedback that surged when the TARDIS failed to leave. The warp field’s energy has dissipated and the TARDIS has materialized. It feels cold and Charley senses a foul stench. The Doctor and Charley look outside the TARDIS and realized that they have landed onboard the star destroyer.

Grash and Captain Jensen argue about spacewalking, but Jensen offers to double their bonuses if they investigate. Grash then takes crew members Chev and Kelsey to investigate.

On the star destroyer, the Doctor and Charley hear the sounds of the Vanguard crew approaching from afar. The Doctor decides that it’s time to leave, but as they approach the TARDIS, they hear a howling sound. The crew members hear this as well and decide to split up. Crew member Kelsey then discovers the TARDIS. Kelsey calls out for the others to look at what he found just when an unseen figure appears and attacks him. The figure utters “destroy."

Part 2 Edit

A scream is heard. Jansen calls for the recon group and Ike responds that Kelsey is in some sort of trouble and requests backup. Jansen requests that she and Vol join them.

The Doctor and Charley hear the scream as well and come across the TARDIS and a severely injured Kelsey. The Doctor checks for a pulse, but it’s very weak and finds from his space suit that he’s a crew member of the Vanguard. Charley checks the name tag which reads Mark Kelsey. As Charley and the Doctor wonder who Kelsey’s assailant is, they hear footsteps approaching. Chev and Grash reveal themselves and are horrified to discover Kelsey’s body. The Doctor urges that Kelsey needs immediate medical attention ASAP, but Jansen’s crew draw their weapons and hold the Doctor and Charley at gunpoint, thinking they were responsible for Kelsey’s attack. Grash contacts Jansen and reports to her that Kelsey’s body has been found as well as the “murderers”. The Doctor then checks for a pulse from Kelsey, but he has succumbed to his wounds. Jensen orders Grash and Chev to turn on their cameras for a visual confirmation and Jansen sees it for herself. Grash requests permission to kill the Doctor and Charley on her authority. Jansen, however, is convinced that there may be something else that killed Kelsey. Jensen orders them to bring the Doctor and Charley to the Vanguard and Charley is thankful that there’s a woman in charge.

As the Doctor and Charley are being brought on the Vanguard, Jansen orders Ike to examine Kelsey’s body. The Doctor and Charley introduce themselves to Jansen as travelers. Jansen asks why they were on the star destroyer and the Charley responds that they were “getting exercise” and looking around. Suddenly, Vol contacts Jansen and says that he has picked up a transmission, but can’t find where it’s coming from. Jansen orders Grash to scan them and finds the sonic screwdriver from the Doctor as well as a tracking device. The Doctor assures them that they are not transmitting anything. Jansen decides to confiscate them and Vol still picks up a transmission and the Doctor sees something moving in the shadows, but it vanished. Jansen asks what it was and Charley sees that it lead to the air locks and left behind scratch marks on the deck plates. Jansen then comes to the conclusion that the Doctor and Charley are not indeed responsible for Kelsey’s death. Grash then thinks that they could be androids, feeling from the Orion War, but Jansen tells him that the Orion War is light years away. Suddenly, the lights begin to flicker. Vol reports that there is some sort of power failure in their area and has activated several emergency batteries, but they’re not working.



Dr. Who - Sword of Orion 1 (mp3  25mb)
Dr. Who - Sword of Orion 2 (mp3  24mb)
Dr. Who - Sword of Orion 3 (mp3  26mb)


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Jul 26, 2015

Sundaze 1530

Hello, The summer storm of the century caused plenty of chaos, hardly surprising then that festivals were cancelled. No Clinton/Funkadelic for me and the carnaval parade was cancelled, enormous disappointment there.

Today a Japanese musician, activist, composer, record producer, writer, singer, pianist, and actor based in Tokyo and New York. Gaining major success in 1978 as a member of the electronic music group Yellow Magic Orchestra, Sakamoto served on keyboards and sometimes vocals. He concurrently pursued a solo career, if ever anyone painted pictures with sound, Ryuichi Sakamoto supercedes them all. Hardly surprising then he's delivered some great soundtracks, here today to   .... N'joy

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Ryuichi Sakamoto (born January 17, 1952 in Tokyo, Japan) studied at the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, where he graduated with a BA in composition, and a Master's degree with special emphasis electronic and ethnic music. Sakamoto began his career in the late 1970s, working as a composer, arranger and producer with some of Japan's most popular rock, jazz and classical artists. He released his first solo album in 1978 but came to fame as a member of Japanese synth-rock outfit Yellow Magic Orchestra with co-founders Haruomi Hosono and Yukihiro Takahashi. He collaborated with David Sylvian on a number of singles and most of Sylvian's albums.

 He appeared in the 1983 Nagisa Oshima film Merry Christmas, Mr Lawrence alongside British rock singer David Bowie; he also wrote the film's musical score. He won the Academy Award for his score to the 1987 Bernardo Bertolucci film The Last Emperor, and has also won two Golden Globe Awards for his work as a film composer.In addition, he also composed music for the 1992 Barcelona Olympics opening ceremony. In the early 1990s, he briefly reunited with YMO, playing an instrumental role in the techno and acid house movements of the era, before parting ways again shortly afterwards.

 His 1999 musical composition "Energy Flow", also known as the alternative title of the single disc Ura BTTB, was the first number-one instrumental single in Japan's Oricon charts history. He has also occasionally worked on anime and video games, as a composer as well as a scenario writer. In the late 2000s, he reunited once again with YMO, while continuing to compose film music.

Since 78 he has released almost 90 albums (solo & soundtrack) , on top of that 2 dozen collaboration albums and YMO 33 years 110+ albums , every 16 weeks an album for 33 years, amazing workethic, puts lots of artists to shame. The 2007 jpg shows a 55 year old man that has greyed considerably, but he looks sharp and balanced into the lens back at you.

 He is also known as a critic of copyright law, arguing that it is antiquated in the information age. He is a member of anti-nuclear organization Stop Rokkasho. Married life obviously suffered and he has been unattached for most of his career, still he has two daughters one of which has stepped into her parents career (mother=Akiko Yano), the J-pop singer Miu Sakamoto.

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The Last Emperor, director Bernardo Bertolucci's epic tale of Pu Yi, the exiled final potentate of China's 3,000-year old Qing dynasty, was the big winner at the 1988 Academy Awards, taking Oscars for (among others) Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Score. The composing trio of Sakamoto/Byrne/Su was an unusual one to be sure, but it's clearly Sakamoto who carries the day here. The avant-garde trained/former Yellow Magic Orchestra pop mastermind crafted a seamless fusion of grand Western themes, Asian shadings, and his own deliciously distinct timbrel sensibilities; an accessible if deceptively modern classicism. Not surprisingly given his Talking Heads roots, Byrne's efforts are more rhythmic and minimal, yet his consuming passion for world music thoroughly evidences itself as well. His lyric and lilting "Main Title Theme" (one of the film's unusual elements was its use of two main themes by separate composers) may offer a pleasant surprise to listeners overly familiar with his pop work. The composer Cong Su is represented by just one cut; but it's a gentle, ethereal spin on Chinese folk influences that fits well with his fellow composers' work. Academy  Award Winner



Ryuichi Sakamoto - The Last Emperor (flac 203mb)

01 First Coronation 1:46
02 Open the Door 2:54
03 Where Is Armo ? 2:25
04 Picking up Brides 2:39
05 Last Emperor 2:19
06 Rain (I Want a Divorce) 1:49
07 Baby (Was Born Dead) 0:55
08 Last Emperor 4:28
09 Last Emperor (Theme) 5:54
10 Main Title Theme (The Last Emperor) (feat: David Byrne) 4:01
11 Picking a Bride (feat: David Byrne) 2:00
12 Bed (feat: David Byrne) 5:00
13 Wind, Rain and Water (feat: David Byrne) 2:18
14 Paper Emperor (feat: David Byrne) 1:47
15 Lunch (feat: Cong Su ) 4:54
16 Red Guard 1:20
17 Emperor's Waltz 3:06
18 Red Guard Dance

Ryuichi Sakamoto - The Last Emperor  (ogg  101mb)

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A varied soundtrack album that manages to weave in a little variation from the traditional type of motion picture scoring indulged in here by Sakamoto. Part of the reason for the variation is that only twelve of the album's 21 tracks are by Sakamoto -- several are source music, others were composed by Richard Horowitz. The diversity thus makes for a more interesting album than might have been had from variations on the main minor-key "Sheltering Sky" theme (presented here in orchestrated and piano-based versions.) It also breaks away from the sound of Sakamoto's recordings, strong material that suffers from a certain digital harshness in the strings.

Horowitz' part in this is in stepping away from traditional Western scoring and using Middle Eastern elements for score structures -- something that's very effective indeed on "Fever Ride" with its blend of Moroccan and Spanish elements. Where Sakamoto easily sketches panorama with his music, Horowitz sketches in mystery. The local source music, too, adds to this, giving the album a grounding in the real world that completes the overall structure. An excellent album that can easily be recommended for more than just soundtrack aficionados.



Ryuichi Sakamoto - The Sheltering Sky (flac 254mb)

01 Unknown Artist - The Sacred Koran 0:42
02 The Sheltering Sky Theme 5:18
03 Belly 1:27
04 Port's Composition 1:24
05 On The Bed (Dream) 1:37
06 Loneliness 1:31
07 On The Hill 6:10
08 Kyoto 1:04
09 Cemetery 1:25
10 Dying 3:30
11 Market 1:41
12 Grand Hotel 2:07
13 The Sheltering Sky Theme (Piano Version) 4:17
14 Charles Trenet - Je Chante 2:44
15 Lionel Hampton - Midnight Sun3:15
16 Horowitz - Fever Ride 3:50
17 Unknown Artist - Chant Avec Cithare 0:45
18 Richard Horowitz - Marnia's Tent 3:03
19 Chaba Zahouania - Goulov Limma 5:46
20 Zarsis - Happy Bus Ride 1:42
21 Richard Horowitz - Night Train 2:00

Ryuichi Sakamoto - The Sheltering Sky  (ogg 115mb)

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Academy Award-winning composer Ryuichi Sakamoto (The Last Emperor) has created one of his most spectacular and inspiring film scores for the soundtrack to Bernardo Bertolucci's epic--Little Buddha. Sakamoto's fusion of electronic and organic instruments beautifully compliment the stunning scenery and powerful images of the film and reflect the awesome scope of the human soul. Magnificent. Tender. Up-lifting. Expansive. Meditative. Music that stands on it's own, without the film, but music that gives the film the majesty and spirituality it was expressing, in depicting scenes from the life of Buddha.



Ryuichi Sakamoto - Little Buddha  (flac 270mb)

01 Main Theme 2:50
02 Opening Titles 1:47
03 The First Meeting 1:50
04 Raga Kirvani 1:28
05 Nepalese Caravan 3:01
06 Victory 1:45
07 Faraway Song 3:18
08 Red Dust 4:38
09 River Ashes 2:25
10 Exodus 2:32
11 Evan's Funeral 4:28
12 The Middle Way 1:50
13 Raga Naiki Kanhra / The Trial (Voc Shruti Sadolikar) 5:24
14 Enlightenment 4:29
15 The Reincarnation 1:51
16 Gompa - Heart Sutra 2:38
17 Acceptance - End Credits 8:58

Ryuichi Sakamoto - Little Buddha   (ogg 111mb)

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Depending on your viewpoint, director Brian De Palma has been frequently lauded/taken to task for liberally appropriating the stylistic flourishes of other directors. And if De Palma's biggest "inspiration" on Snake Eyes is Alfred Hitchcock, the director found an admirable, if unlikely, semblance of frequent Hitchcock collaborator Bernard Herrmann in Ryuichi Sakamoto. Though better known for more delicate, electronic, and ethnically tinged work, here Sakamoto does a truly amazing Benny impression, cranking up the brass and swirling the strings into an unsettling sonic maelstrom that would've done late '50s Hitch proud. Snake Eyes instantly begins with an awesome theme played out on lush violins. It echoes Bernard Herrmann classic scores to Hitchcock movies. And seeing as how with this movie Brian DePalma was paying tribute to Hitchcock it's only fitting that Sakamoto would be such a sport. Usually when a score imitates another movie it doesn't stand on its own. But Snakes Eyes sounds soooo cool. Meredith Brooks and LaKiesha Berry also contribute a pair of songs in the contemporary pop vein .



Ryuichi Sakamoto - Snake Eyes  (flac 255mb)

1 Snake Eyes (Short Version) 2:51
2 Assassination 2:41
3 The Hunt 6:09
4 Julia's Story #1 1:23
5 Tyler And Serena 4:37
6 Kevin Cleans Up 2:13
7 You Know Him 2:19
8 Blood On The Medals 2:02
9 Crawling To Julia 3:24
10 The Storm 4:30
11 Snake Eyes (Long Version) 7:39
12 Meredith Brooks - Sin City 4:05
13 LaKiesha Berri - The Freaky Things 3:35

Ryuichi Sakamoto - Snake Eyes   (ogg 103mb)

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Jul 25, 2015

RhoDeo 1529 Grooves

Hello, a bit of local surfing and much to my surprise George Clinton /Funkadelic will be giving a free concert tomorrow night less then a 15 min walk away from my home, bit of a pity the weather tomorrow is autumn like (with storm) this after plenty of fine weather this summer thusfar, i hope those doing the carnival streetparade in the afternoon dont get blown away and see their creations disintegrated. I wont be watching, the Tour de France has its grand finale at Alpe D'Huez tomorrow...


Today and these last weeks you'll got an American funk band that defined New Orleans funk, not only on their own recordings, but also as the backing band for numerous artists, and they did themselves another fovor by appearing and releasing great music under their family name far the latter part of the previous century  Despite their reputation as an extraordinary live band, they never broke into the mainstream, but their sound provided the basis for much of the funk and hip-hop of the '80s and '90s.   ... N'joy

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Throughout their long careers as both solo performers and as members of the group that bore their family name, the Neville Brothers proudly carried the torch of their native New Orleans' rich R&B legacy. Although the four siblings -- Arthur, Charles, Aaron, and Cyril -- did not officially unite under the Neville Brothers aegis until 1977, all had crossed musical paths in the past, while also enjoying success with other unrelated projects: Eldest brother Art was the first to tackle a recording career, when in 1954 his high school band the Hawketts cut "Mardi Gras Mambo," a song that later became the annual carnival's unofficial anthem. Both Aaron and Charles later joined the Hawketts as well, and when Art joined the Navy in 1958, he handed Aaron the group's vocal reins.

Two years later, Aaron scored his first solo hit, "Over You"; in 1966, he notched a pop smash with the classic "Tell It Like It Is," a lush ballad showcasing his gossamer vocals. Art, meanwhile, returned from the service to begin his own solo career, and recorded a series of regional hits like "Cha Dooky Doo," "Zing Zing," and "Oo-Whee Baby." In 1967, he formed Art Neville and the Sounds, which included both Aaron and Charles as featured vocalists and quickly became a sensation on the local club circuit.

In 1968 producer Allen Toussaint hired the group as the house band for his Sansu Enterprises; minus Aaron and Charles, the Sounds evolved into a highly regarded rhythm section which backed artists as diverse as Lee Dorsey, Robert Palmer, and LaBelle before eventually finding fame on their own as the Meters. Consequently, Aaron resumed his solo career, although with only sporadic success; as a result, he also worked as a dock hand. Charles, meanwhile, relocated to New York City, where his skills as a saxophonist led to tenures with a variety of jazz units; after returning to New Orleans, he was arrested for possession of marijuana and served a three-year sentence at the Angola Prison Farm.

In 1975, the Meters backed the Wild Tchoupitoulas, a group led by the Nevilles' uncle, George "Big Chief Jolly" Landry. Both Aaron and Charles were enlisted for the session, as was youngest brother Cyril; when the Meters disbanded the following year, the four brothers backed the Tchoupitoulas on tour, and in 1977 they officially banded together as the Neville Brothers. Despite their gift for intricate four-part harmonies, their self-titled 1978 debut unsuccessfully cast the vocal quartet as a disco band, and following a dismal response they were dropped by their label, Capitol.

The Nevilles spent the following three years without a contract, but after signing with A&M, fan Bette Midler helped secure the services of producer Joel Dorn for 1981's superior Fiyo on the Bayou, which spotlighted Aaron's angelic tenor on standards like "Mona Lisa" and "The Ten Commandments of Love" along with renditions of "Iko Iko" and "Brother John." Despite widespread critical acclaim, the album sold poorly, and again the Nevilles were cut loose from their contract. After signing to the tiny Black Top label, they issued 1984's Neville-ization, an incendiary live set recorded at the Crescent City landmark Tipitina's which featured Duke Ellington's "Caravan" and Aaron's perennial "Tell It Like It Is" alongside the brothers' own "Africa" and "Fear, Hate, Envy, Jealousy."

After another concert album, 1987's Live at Tipitina's, the Nevilles signed with EMI and returned to the studio in 1987 with Uptown, which again met with commercial failure despite cameo appearances from Keith Richards, Jerry Garcia, and Carlos Santana. In 1989, they re-signed to A&M and recruited the services of famed New Orleans producer Daniel Lanois; the atmospheric Yellow Moon, the group's finest hour, finally earned them success on the charts, thanks in part to the anthemic single "Sister Rosa." 1990's Brother's Keeper fared even better, no doubt spurred by Aaron's concurrent success with Linda Ronstadt on the smash duet "Don't Know Much."

In subsequent years, Aaron reignited his solo career while also remaining with his brothers; while the Nevilles retained their cult following with LPs like 1992's Family Groove, 1994's Live on Planet Earth, and 1996's Mitakuye Oyasin Oyasin/All My Relations, Aaron scored a Top Ten hit in 1991 with the single "Everybody Plays the Fool," taken from the Ronstadt-produced Warm Your Heart. In 1993, he notched a minor hit with "Don't Take Away My Heaven" from the LP The Grand Tour; a year later, he found success with "I Fall to Pieces," a duet with country star Trisha Yearwood. In 1990, Charles also issued the jazz collection Charles Neville & Diversity.

In addition, a second generation of Nevilles also began making their mark on music; in 1988, Aaron's son Ivan, a member of Keith Richards' backing band the Xpensive Winos, released his solo debut, If My Ancestors Could See Me Now. The Neville Brothers legacy continued in 1999 with Valence Street.


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At the dawn of the 21st century, the Neville Brothers may well be the greatest living institution of New Orleans R&B, but it took a long time for them to achieve such a lofty status, and the talents of Aaron, Art, Charles, and Cyril Neville had been scattered through a number of different groups (and a number of different record labels) over the space of three decades before they began to finally gain the nationwide recognition they richly deserved in the mid-'80s. Treacherous: A History of the Neville Brothers was the first compilation album to paint a reasonably accurate picture of the full scope of the Nevilles' accomplishment, and it still stands as the best introduction to their body of work. While it predates their acclaimed collaborations with producer Daniel Lanois on Yellow Moon and Brother's Keeper, it's a near-flawless representation of the Neville Brothers' earlier period (both as individuals and collectively), blending classic New Orleans R&B, smooth balladry, traditional second-line rhythms, potent Crescent City funk, and plenty of stops in between into a mighty and potent gumbo of joyous groove. Treacherous also cherrypicks the highlights from several unfortunately uneven albums, and flows more comfortably than many of the group's "real" albums. Anyone with even a passing interest in New Orleans music needs to check out the Neville Brothers, and this collection is as good a starter as anyone could hope for.



The Neville Brothers - Treacherous, A History Of  (flac  251mb)

01 The Hawketts - Mardi Gras Mambo 2:14
02 Art Neville - Cha Dooky-Do 2:30
03 Art Neville - Zing, Zing 2:00
04 Aaron Neville - Over You 2:18
05 Aaron Neville - Every Day 2:51
065 Aaron Neville - Let's Live 2:45
07 Aaron Neville - Waiting At The Station 2:22
08 Art Neville - All These Things 3:18
09 Aaron Neville , How Can I Help But Love You 2:53
10 Aaron Neville - Wrong Number (I Am Sorry, Goodbye) 2:41
11 Aaron Neville - Where Is My Baby 3:49
12 Cyril Neville - Gossip 2:56
13 Aaron Neville - Hercules 4:03
14 The Wild Tchoupitoulas - Meet De Boys On The Battlefront 3:22

The Neville Brothers - Treacherous A History Of (ogg 80mb)

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The Neville Brothers - Treacherous A History Of 2  (flac 416mb)

01 The Wild Tchoupitoulas - Brother John 3:34
02 Aaron Neville - The Greatest Love 3:41
03 The Neville Brothers - Performance 3:04
04 The Neville Brothers - Dancing Jones 3:10
05 The Neville Brothers - Arianne 4:45
06 The Neville Brothers - Washable Ink 3:59
07 Aaron Neville - I Love Her Too 3:50
08 The Neville Brothers - Hey Pocky Way 4:12
09 The Neville Brothers - Sitting In Limbo 4:10
10 The Neville Brothers - Fire On The Bayou 5:17
11 The Neville Brothers - Fever 5:11
12 Aaron Neville - Tell It Like It Is 2:41
13 The Neville Brothers - Fear, Hate, Envy, Jealousy 4:20
14 The Neville Brothers - Amazing Grace / Down By The Riverside / Amen (Live) 7:48

The Neville Brothers - Treacherous A History Of 2  (ogg 146)

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Okay, there's no such thing as secondhand revelation, but the Neville Brothers had more than enough stray tracks from their decades of local music-making around New Orleans to justify this second, single-disc follow-up to Rhino's first Nevilles history. There's more of an emphasis on novelty material here, but once again you can hear the roots of the Nevilles' cross-genre appeal in pop, R&B, and soul music dating back to the 1950s. Since most of these songs were recorded as singles, they have an immediate surface appeal, but repeated listenings also bring out the sounds of the tight session bands (including members of the Meters) who backed the Nevilles up. Actually, it's only the five 1980s tracks from just-OK albums like Neville-ization and Uptown that keep this collection from classic status, not the older stuff.



The Neville Brothers - Treacherous Too ! Vol. 2 (1955-1987) (flac 399mb)

01 The Hawketts - Your Time's Up 2:34
02 Art Neville - Oooh-Whee Baby 2:11
03 Art Neville - What's Going On 2:03
04 Aaron Neville -How Many Times 2:42
05 Aaron Neville - Humdinger 2:41
06 Art Neville - Skeet Skat 2:44
07 Art Neville - Lover Of Love 2:35
08 Art Neville - Hook, Line And Sinker 2:37
09 Aaron Neville - Why Worry 2:34
10 Aaron Neville - Jailhouse 3:15
11 Aaron Neville - She's On My Mind  2:43
12 Cyril Neville - Tell Me What's On Your Mind  2:52
13 The Neville Brothers - Break Away 4:28
14 The Neville Brothers - Mojo Hannah 5:30
15 The Neville Brothers - Midnight Key 4:29
16 The Neville Brothers - Drift Away 4:00
17 The Neville Brothers - Spirits Of The World  4:28
18 The Neville Brothers - Wake Up 3:34

The Neville Brothers - Treacherous Too ! Vol. 2 (1955-1987) (ogg 123mb)

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Taken from the same September 1982 live dates at the Neville Brothers' favorite hometown haunt, from which 1984's superior Nevillization is culled, this ten-song sequel suffers from some post-show overdubbing and over-heightened audience effects. And the spirited group bonding/playing and stage comfort zone that was reached on Neville-ization just doesn't come through as strong here. But the band and song selection on Nevillization II/Live at Tipitina's are as nearly primed as they are on the first part (brother Cyril's "Wishin'" and the traditional "Little Liza Jane" are particularly good), making it a listenable follow-up, if not a totally necessary one.



The Neville Brothers - Live at Tipitina's (flac 412mb)

01 Pocky Way 9:30
02 Wishin 3:31
03 Rock & Roll Medley 6:21
04 All Over Again 2:51
05 Everybody´s Got To Wake Up 3:28
06 Dance Your Blues Away 6:09
07 Doo Wop Medley 7:22
08 Little Liza Jane 3:57
09 Wildflower 5:08
10 My Girl 4:04
11 Riverside 5:53
12 Saib´s Groove 3:55

The Neville Brothers - Live at Tipitina's (ogg 139mb)

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Jul 23, 2015

RhoDeo 1529 Goldy Rhox 219

Hello, today the 219th post of Goldy Rhox, classic pop rock. In the darklight a UK band first popular in Europe, the band quickly became successful in North America during the British Invasion of the mid 1960s. Having released 22 studio albums in the UK(24 in the US), nine live albums (ten in the US), and numerous compilations, their worldwide sales are estimated at more than 200 million albums. In 1971 they began a string of eight consecutive studio albums reaching number one in the United States. Their most recent album of entirely new material, was released in 2005. In 1989, the band were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 2004, they ranked number 4 in Rolling Stone magazine's 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. In 2008, Billboard magazine ranked the them at number ten on "The Billboard Hot 100 Top All-Time Artists", and as the second most successful group in the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.



Today's mystery album is the 14th British and 16th American studio album by our mystery artist, released in 1978 on their own label. It reached number one on the Billboard 200 album chart, and became the band's top selling album in the United States, certified by the RIAA as having six million copies sold as of 2000. It was a major critical success, becoming the only album in their career to be nominated for a Grammy in the Album of the Year category. Many reviewers calling it a classic return to form.

In the UK, the punk rock movement was a rising force and made most artists connected with the 1960s era seem obsolete. The group had also failed to produce a critically acclaimed album since 1972.At least as important for the band's re-invigoration was the addition of Ronnie Wood to the line-up, as today's mystery album was the first album recorded with him as a full member. His guitar playing style meshed with that of Keith Richards and slide guitar playing would become one of the band's hallmarks. Not only did his unconventional uses of the instrument featured prominently on today's mystery album he also contributed to the writing process.

The album cover for today's mystery album was designed by Peter Corriston, who would design the next three album covers as well, with illustrations by Hubert Kretzschmar. An elaborate die-cut design, with colours varying on different sleeves, it featured The band faces alongside those of select female celebrities inserted into a copy of an old Valmor Products Corporation advertisement. The cover design was challenged legally when Lucille Ball, Farrah Fawcett, Liza Minnelli (representing her mother Judy Garland), Raquel Welch, and the estate of Marilyn Monroe threatened to sue for the use of their likenesses without permission. Similarly, Valmor did take legal action and were given a monetary award for the use of their design. The album was quickly re-issued with a redesigned cover that removed all the celebrities whether they had complained or not, and were replaced with black and punk style garish colours with the phrase Pardon our appearance - cover under re-construction.

Here today the 2011 remaster fully extended (22 tracks)  N'Joy



Goldy Rhox 219   (flac 572mb)

Goldy Rhox 219    (ogg 191mb)


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Jul 22, 2015

RhoDeo 1529 Aetix

Hello, sorry for the lack of updates i've been smoking too much weed this weekend, barely managed to do the regular posting. Slept a lot too even today ah yes holidaze... Meanwhile we've almost reached the final US-Aetix posting here but before that..

Forming in Los Angeles in the late '70s, (Doug Fieger, vocals/guitar; Berton Averre, lead guitar; Prescott Niles, bass; and Bruce Gary, drums) were neither punk nor rock, but pure simple pop, standing out among the musical dross that littered the Sunset Strip. Signing with Capitol after a feeding frenzy of label offers, with its leadoff single, "My Sharona," the band climbed both the album and singles charts (eventually selling millions of copies around the globe), gained wide commercial acceptance, and regenerated the power pop scene that had laid dormant for half a decade. But the press...   .....N'Joy

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Singer Doug Fieger was a native of Oak Park, Michigan, a northern suburb of Detroit, Michigan, and grew up in the 9 Mile/Coolidge area. The brother of attorney Geoffrey Fieger (later known for representing Dr. Jack Kevorkian in a series of assisted suicide cases) Fieger had previously played in an eclectic rock band called Sky as well as the Sunset Bombers. Although Sky had received a modest amount of acclaim, including being produced by Rolling Stones producer Jimmy Miller, the band broke up without having any chart success. As a result, Fieger made the decision to move to Los Angeles and start another band.

Fieger met the three other original members of the Knack in 1977 and 1978: Berton Averre (lead guitar, backing vocals and keyboards), Prescott Niles (bass), and Bruce Gary (drums). Niles was the last to join, a week before the band's first show in June 1978.[5] In the meantime, Fieger had been doubling on bass on a series of demos that the group had shopped to several record labels, all of which were rejected. Some of these songs later made up the band's debut album Get the Knack, and included "Good Girls Don't".

Within months of their live debut, popular club gigs on the Sunset Strip, as well as guest jams with musicians such as Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty and Ray Manzarek, led to the band being the subject of a record label bidding war. (Bruce Gary was well known in the LA session scene; this became a source for later tensions.) They ultimately signed to Capitol Records. The Knack – "My Sharona" (1979)

The band's debut album, Get the Knack, was one of the year's best-selling albums, holding the number one spot on Billboard magazine's album chart for five consecutive weeks and selling two million copies in the United States. The lead single, "My Sharona", was a No. 1 hit in the US, and became the number-one song of 1979. Follow-up single "Good Girls Don't" peaked at No. 11 in the US, and reached No. 1 in Canada.

However, the band's rise to the top of the charts also precipitated a backlash. Capitol's packaging of Get the Knack included a perceived cover likeness to Meet the Beatles!, with the record's center label being the same design and style as the Beatles' early 1960s LPs. Coupled with the band's "retro" 1960s look and pop/rock sound, the company's stylings led detractors to accuse them of being Beatles rip-offs, which the band and their record company denied. Nonetheless, this perception, and the perception that the object of some of the Knack's songs were teenaged girls, (subsequently acknowledged when the band were years older), quickly led to a "Knuke the Knack" campaign led by San Francisco artist Hugh Brown.
The follow-up albums (1980–81)

The Knack quickly recorded a follow-up album ...But the Little Girls Understand, which was released in early 1980. Though the album went gold in the US and Japan, and platinum in Canada,[5] it didn't meet with the same level of commercial success as their debut. Fieger claimed in later interviews that all of the tracks for Get the Knack and ...But the Little Girls Understand were written before the first LP was recorded and were intended to be put out as a double album. Additionally, the lead single "Baby Talks Dirty" only briefly made the US Top 40, stalling at No. 38 (but reaching No. 13 in Canada); follow-up single "Can't Put a Price on Love" missed the top 40 altogether, peaking at No. 62.

After nearly a year of relentless touring in the US, Canada, Europe, New Zealand, Australia, and Japan, starting in April 1980 the band took a year off because of exhaustion and "internal dissent". They reconvened in the summer of 1981 to record their third album, Round Trip. However, the record (which came out in October 1981) was a serious commercial disappointment, only reaching No. 93 on the US charts, selling 150,000 copies. As well, lead single "Pay the Devil (Ooo, Baby, Ooo)" topped out at a mere No. 67 on the Billboard Hot 100. The group made several concert appearances during 1981 to promote Round Trip. Keyboardist Phil Jost was brought into the lineup at this time to enable the band to duplicate the more heavily layered sound of their new release.

With the Knack experiencing rapidly diminishing chart success, and mounting critical backlash against them Fieger left amidst internal squabbles on December 31, 1981, just months after the release of Round Trip. The band rehearsed briefly with Michael Des Barres as their new frontman in early 1982, but this line-up never gigged or recorded. By mid-1982, the Knack had splintered for good.

The Knack reunited in November 1986, to play a benefit for Michele Myers, who had been the first person to book the band for a show in 1978. They continued to play club gigs for the next several years. In July 1989, Billy Ward replaced Bruce Gary as the band's drummer .the Knack signed with Charisma Records and recorded the album Serious Fun which was released in February 1991. Lead single "Rocket O' Love" was a top 10 hit on US AOR stations (and a top 30 hit in Canada). To promote the song, they released a music video loaded with visual innuendo thematic to the song. Charisma collapsed after the death of the label's founder, Tony Stratton-Smith, and the group broke up again in 1992.

In 1994, with Ward back on drums, the band reunited to make some concert appearances to captilize on "My Sharona"'s new popularity after its appearance in the movie Reality Bites. In 1996, all four original band members, including Bruce Gary, reunited in the studio one last time to record a track for a multi-artist compilation album, saluting the British band Badfinger (where the band covered Badfinger's hit "No Matter What". The Knack continued as a touring and recording act through the late 1990s and into the 2000s.

In 2006, during a performance in Las Vegas, Fieger became disoriented, developing a dull headache, and grasping for the words to the songs that he had written and performed for years. Diagnosed with two brain tumors, Fieger underwent surgery and radiosurgery and returned to performing. However, he still continued to battle brain and lung cancer until his death on February 14, 2010, in Woodland Hills, California, at the age of 57.

In the interim between the Knack's break-up and 1986 reunion, Doug Fieger worked as a guest vocalist on a few tracks by Was (Not Was). (Fieger had grown up with band member Don Was; Was would later produce the Knack's album Serious Fun.) Fieger also recorded a solo album in 2000. Bruce Gary became a respected producer (archive recordings of Jimi Hendrix and new recordings of The Ventures) and a very successful sideman performing live and on studio sessions with artists such as Jack Bruce, Mick Taylor, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Cherie Currie, Robby Krieger, Spencer Davis, Stephen Stills, Rod Stewart, Emmett Chapman, and Sheryl Crow. Gary died from lymphoma on August 22, 2006 at the age of 55.


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The Knack attempted to update the Beatles sound for the new wave era on their debut -- a good idea that was well executed, but critics cried "foul" when millions sold after Capitol's pre-release hype (it went gold in 13 days and eventually sold five million copies, making it one of the most successful debuts in history). Get the Knack is at once sleazy, sexist, hook-filled, and endlessly catchy -- above all, it's a guilty pleasure and an exercise in simple fun. When is power pop legitimate anyway? Includes the unforgettable hits "My Sharona" and "Good Girls Don't."



The Knack - Get The Knack  (flac 302mb)

01 Let Me Out 2:20
02 Your Number Or Your Name 2:57
03 Oh Tara 3:04
04 (She's So) Selfish 4:30
05 Maybe Tonight 4:00
06 Good Girls Don't 3:07
07 My Sharona 4:52
08 Heartbeat 2:11
09 Siamese Twins (The Monkey And Me) 3:25
10 Lucinda 4:00
11 That's What The Little Girls Do 2:41
12 Frustrated 3:51

The Knack - Get The Knack   (ogg 109mb)

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Mike Chapman summed it up best in the liner notes -- "The songs are an assortment of feelings and emotions expressed redundantly as only the Knack can...This record is very dear to me and my bank manager." The self-deprecating title (which quotes Willie Dixon's "Back Door Man") isn't really an attempt to apologize but rather to let everyone know that they were in on the joke all along -- and they're laughing all the way to the bank. This is essentially a rewrite of the debut, especially evident on the lead-off single "Baby Talks Dirty." It's not as good as Get the Knack and didn't sell nearly as well, but it is a good time for those who don't take rock & roll too seriously.



The Knack - But The Little Girls Understand  (flac 202mb)

01 Baby Talks Dirty 3:46
02 I Want Ya 2:40
03 Tell Me You're Mine 3:54
04 Mr. Handleman 3:23
05 Can't Put A Price On Love 4:43
06 Hold On Tight And Don't Let Go 1:31
07 The Hard Way 2:13
08 It's You 2:09
09 End Of The Game 2:03
10 The Feeling I Get 3:11
11 (Havin' A) Rave Up 1:46
12 How Can Love Hurt So Much 3:50

 The Knack - But The Little Girls Underst (ogg  78mb )

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It must suck to be the Knack. First off, there was the huge unexpected success of their debut album, Get the Knack, followed almost immediately by the equally unexpected career-damaging "Knuke the Knack" underground campaign. If that wasn't bad enough, their superior sophomore release, ...But the Little Girls Understand, was universally and unfairly dismissed as an inferior rehash of the debut. After such a tumultuous two-year roller coaster ride, the boys in the Knack took a well-deserved breather. When their third album, Round Trip, emerged in 1981, Doug Fieger and the boys in the Knack had matured ten-fold and had created their best album to date. Produced by Jack Douglas, Round Trip had more musical layers than any Knack album before (or since). "Just Wait and See," "Radiating Love," "Boys Go Crazy," and "She Likes the Beat" were instant Knack classics, but with more skin and bone. "Lil' Cal's Big Mistake" could've been an unreleased Blood, Sweat & Tears track. "Africa" was Weather Report on pop-flavored steroids. "We Are Waiting" and "Sweet Dreams" sound like outtakes from the last John Lennon sessions (Douglas produced Double Fantasy). Two of the Knack's best tracks are here, and both are worth the price of admission alone. "Pay the Devil (Ooo, Baby, Ooo)" is a beautifully haunting ballad while "Another Lousy Day in Paradise" is the Knack's entire musical essence squeezed into one three-minute pop song. Brilliant. A few weeks after this brilliant album was released (to poor reviews, it should be said), the Knack split up. While they were at their creative high, they were at their commercial and critical low. Again, it must suck to be the Knack.



The Knack - Round Trip  (flac 465mb)

01 Radiating Love 3:59
02 Soul Kissin 3:35
03 Africa 4:51
04 She Likes The Beat 2:57
05 Just Wait And See 3:00
06 We Are Waiting 4:21
07 Boys Go Crazy 3:47
08 Lil' Cals Big Mistake 3:47
09 Sweet Dreams 3:28
10 Another Lousy Day In Paradise 3:39
11 Pay The Devil 3:59
12 Art War 3:45
Previously Unreleased Bonus Tracks
13 Go Away, Stay Away 3:32
14 Lil' Cals Big Mistake (Live) 4:00
15 Art War (Alternate Mix) 3:47
16 On The Beach (Rehersal Recording) 6:06
17 Pay The Devil (Ooo, Baby, Ooo) (Songwriting Demo / Alternate Version) 4:40

The Knack - Round Trip   (ogg 155mb)

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Jul 20, 2015

RhoDeo 1529 Sword of Orion - 3

Hello,


Today a new audioplay, Sword of Orion is a Big Finish Productions audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. This audio drama was broadcast on BBC 7 in four weekly parts starting from 3 September 2005, and was repeated in 2006.

ps if you missed part one there's the description at the bottom of the page as well as a downloadlink

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Sword of Orion was the seventeenth monthly Doctor Who audio story produced by Big Finish Productions. This was a double first, being the first Big Finish story to feature the Cybermen, and the first Eighth Doctor story to feature the Cybermen. This is also another of Big Finish's stories which was originally created as part of the Audio Visuals, a fan produced series which featured many people who went onto create and work for Big Finish and BBV Productions. Nicholas Briggs filled many roles in the production of this story — he provided the voice of the Cybermen, sound design, music, direction, and writing; his appearance as the voice of the Cybermen here predates TV: Rise of the Cybermen. This story also established the Orion War which would be built upon years later in Big Finish's spin-off series, Cyberman

The human race is locked in deadly combat with the "Android Hordes" in the Orion System. Light years from the front line, the Eighth Doctor and Charley arrive to sample the dubious delights of a galactic backwater, little suspecting that the consequences of the Orion War might reach them there. But High Command's lust for victory knows no bounds. Trapped aboard a mysterious, derelict star destroyer, the Doctor and Charley find themselves facing summary execution. But this is only the beginning of their troubles. The real danger has yet to awaken. Until, somewhere in the dark recesses of the Garazone System, the Cybermen receive the signal for reactivation...


Cast
The Doctor — Paul McGann
Charley Pollard — India Fisher
Thinnes — Mark Gatiss
Digly — Barnaby Edwards
Ike — Ian Marr
Grash — Bruce Montague
Vol — Hylton Collins
Deeva Jansen — Michelle Livingstone
Chev — Helen Goldwyn
Kelsey — Toby Longworth
Cybermen — Nicholas Briggs, Alistair Lock



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Dr. Who - Sword of Orion 3 (mp3  26mb)

01 Sword of Orion 3      28:25


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previously

Charley is worried about Ramsay looking ill. She and the Doctor can't carry him to the control room and Ramsay is dying from being away too long from the time vortex. The Doctor decides that there is one way to restore Ramsay back to health, but doesn’t tell Charley, who is flustered to know.

2503. The Orion War continues to rage and a ship called the Silver Jackal receives contact from a patrol ship. Onboard the Silver Jackal, Digly convinces the patrol ship to leave so they can salvage an area in space. Digly wakes up Captain Thinnes and then picks up something on radar—an abandoned star destroyer. Captain Thinnes decides to go onboard the star destroyer to investigate and find “souvenirs”.

Captain Thinnes and Digly don their spacesuits and enter the star destroyer. They sense a foul stench onboard, but before they continue, something heads towards them. They open fire, but it is not harmed. They retreat, but they are killed by the figure.

The TARDIS lands in a bazaar on the Garazone Central. Charley tries to communicate with a merchant to get help for Ramsay, but Charley is slightly disturbed by the merchant’s suggestive compliments to her. She gives up and meets up with the Doctor, who also hasn’t found anything. The Doctor and Charley then check out another shop in the bazaar and decide to look around. The Doctor convinces the shopkeeper, Ike, that they are Customs and Excise officials so they can browse peacefully and the Doctor comes across a recorder. The Doctor and Charley then find a golden plated Cyberman head in the shop and the Doctor recognizes it.

Outside, Ike contacts a man named Grash and Ike expresses concern about the disappearances of Thinnes and Digly as well as the Silver Jackal. Grash orders him to calm down, but Ike thinks that his shop is about to be “rumbled” by two individuals. Grash then tells Ike that Captain Obermann has been transferred to the Vanguard. And a new captain has been brought onboard and brought forward the disembarkation time. Grash urgently tells Ike to leave the shop and get to the docking bay immediately.

Back in the shop, Charley asks the Doctor the length of the Cyber-War. The Doctor answers that it was a very long time and informs her that the Cybermen remain in their tombs on Telos for the time being. The Doctor and Charley then notice that Ike has abandoned them. Charley thinks that he has gone to get his “smuggler friends” to beat them to a pulp, but the Doctor disagrees. Charley reminds the Doctor that he told Ike where the TARDIS was and confirms that the Doctor is indeed worried. The Doctor orders Charley to take a grav-pad and the nearby book of ancient remedies. Charley protests that this would be theft, but the Doctor remarks that it’s probably stolen anyway and they run from the shop.

A man named Vol contacts the Vanguard captain from the docking bay. The Captain asks for the status of the supplies. Vol answers that they are in place, but he has to check each of them. The Captain responds that this would take too long and they are to load them immediately, disobeying procedures.

The Doctor and Charley activate the grav-pads, which excite Charley and head to the warehouse, where the TARDIS is parked. They then spot the TARDIS being loaded onto the Vanguard as cargo. Charley sees that the cargo number is 38B. The Doctor then tells Charley that they have less than ten minutes to get onboard before it takes off. Ike arrives onboard and Captain Jensen orders Vol to blast them off. The Vanguard leaves the docking bay.

It is then revealed that the Doctor and Charley were successful in stowing away onboard thanks to the Sonic Screwdriver. They then begin to search for the TARDIS in the cargo area for 38B. Charley feels a vibration on the wall and the Doctor confirms that this is from some sort of interstellar drive for ship that is moving really fast. The Doctor sees that the Vanguard is a scrap ship and wonders why they are in such a hurry. Charley sees that they are now in 38A, but then hear a noise that indicates that there may be something wrong with the engines.

On the bridge, a proximity alarm sounds and Vol then orders Ike to cut the power on the engines. The engines die just when Charley finds 38B, but the Doctor remarks that they better get off the ship because cutting off the engines in midflight of this ship is dangerous

The Vanguard then picks up on radar that they have come across an abandoned star destroyer. Captain Jensen orders a maneuver, but the engines have been cut off. Jensen reluctantly orders to initiate the hyperdrive. Ike and Vol protest that they just cut the engine off and that restarted would be dangerous and would also take time to power up again. Jensen insists her orders.

The Doctor and Charley come across the TARDIS and enter. The Doctor runs to the console and patches the TARDIS’ scanner to visual transmission of the Vanguard, meaning that from the TARDIS, they’ll be able to see what the Vanguard sees. They then see that there is a cold-looking star destroyer in front of the Vanguard. Charley sees that the star destroyer is moving towards them, but the Doctor sees that rather the Vanguard is moving towards it. The Doctor rushes the controls and decides it’s time to go. The TARDIS then stops suddenly. The Doctor then sees that the TARDIS has been caught in the Vanguard’s warp field, preventing them from travelling away. Ramsey would feel better from the temporal time feedback that surged when the TARDIS failed to leave. The warp field’s energy has dissipated and the TARDIS has materialized. It feels cold and Charley senses a foul stench. The Doctor and Charley look outside the TARDIS and realized that they have landed onboard the star destroyer.

Grash and Captain Jensen argue about spacewalking, but Jensen offers to double their bonuses if they investigate. Grash then takes crew members Chev and Kelsey to investigate.

On the star destroyer, the Doctor and Charley hear the sounds of the Vanguard crew approaching from afar. The Doctor decides that it’s time to leave, but as they approach the TARDIS, they hear a howling sound. The crew members hear this as well and decide to split up. Crew member Kelsey then discovers the TARDIS. Kelsey calls out for the others to look at what he found just when an unseen figure appears and attacks him. The figure utters “destroy."

Part 2 Edit

A scream is heard. Jansen calls for the recon group and Ike responds that Kelsey is in some sort of trouble and requests backup. Jansen requests that she and Vol join them.

The Doctor and Charley hear the scream as well and come across the TARDIS and a severely injured Kelsey. The Doctor checks for a pulse, but it’s very weak and finds from his space suit that he’s a crew member of the Vanguard. Charley checks the name tag which reads Mark Kelsey. As Charley and the Doctor wonder who Kelsey’s assailant is, they hear footsteps approaching. Chev and Grash reveal themselves and are horrified to discover Kelsey’s body. The Doctor urges that Kelsey needs immediate medical attention ASAP, but Jansen’s crew draw their weapons and hold the Doctor and Charley at gunpoint, thinking they were responsible for Kelsey’s attack. Grash contacts Jansen and reports to her that Kelsey’s body has been found as well as the “murderers”. The Doctor then checks for a pulse from Kelsey, but he has succumbed to his wounds. Jensen orders Grash and Chev to turn on their cameras for a visual confirmation and Jansen sees it for herself. Grash requests permission to kill the Doctor and Charley on her authority. Jansen, however, is convinced that there may be something else that killed Kelsey. Jensen orders them to bring the Doctor and Charley to the Vanguard and Charley is thankful that there’s a woman in charge.

As the Doctor and Charley are being brought on the Vanguard, Jansen orders Ike to examine Kelsey’s body. The Doctor and Charley introduce themselves to Jansen as travelers. Jansen asks why they were on the star destroyer and the Charley responds that they were “getting exercise” and looking around. Suddenly, Vol contacts Jansen and says that he has picked up a transmission, but can’t find where it’s coming from. Jansen orders Grash to scan them and finds the sonic screwdriver from the Doctor as well as a tracking device. The Doctor assures them that they are not transmitting anything. Jansen decides to confiscate them and Vol still picks up a transmission and the Doctor sees something moving in the shadows, but it vanished. Jansen asks what it was and Charley sees that it lead to the air locks and left behind scratch marks on the deck plates. Jansen then comes to the conclusion that the Doctor and Charley are not indeed responsible for Kelsey’s death. Grash then thinks that they could be androids, feeling from the Orion War, but Jansen tells him that the Orion War is light years away. Suddenly, the lights begin to flicker. Vol reports that there is some sort of power failure in their area and has activated several emergency batteries, but they’re not working.



Dr. Who - Sword of Orion 1 (mp3  25mb)
Dr. Who - Sword of Orion 2 (mp3  24mb)

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Jul 19, 2015

Sundaze 1529

Hello,

Today a Japanese musician, activist, composer, record producer, writer, singer, pianist, and actor based in Tokyo and New York. Gaining major success in 1978 as a member of the electronic music group Yellow Magic Orchestra, Sakamoto served on keyboards and sometimes vocals. He concurrently pursued a solo career, if ever anyone painted pictures with sound, Ryuichi Sakamoto supercedes them all.   .... N'joy

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Ryuichi Sakamoto (born January 17, 1952 in Tokyo, Japan) studied at the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, where he graduated with a BA in composition, and a Master's degree with special emphasis electronic and ethnic music. Sakamoto began his career in the late 1970s, working as a composer, arranger and producer with some of Japan's most popular rock, jazz and classical artists. He released his first solo album in 1978 but came to fame as a member of Japanese synth-rock outfit Yellow Magic Orchestra with co-founders Haruomi Hosono and Yukihiro Takahashi. He collaborated with David Sylvian on a number of singles and most of Sylvian's albums.

 He appeared in the 1983 Nagisa Oshima film Merry Christmas, Mr Lawrence alongside British rock singer David Bowie; he also wrote the film's musical score. He won the Academy Award for his score to the 1987 Bernardo Bertolucci film The Last Emperor, and has also won two Golden Globe Awards for his work as a film composer.In addition, he also composed music for the 1992 Barcelona Olympics opening ceremony. In the early 1990s, he briefly reunited with YMO, playing an instrumental role in the techno and acid house movements of the era, before parting ways again shortly afterwards.

 His 1999 musical composition "Energy Flow", also known as the alternative title of the single disc Ura BTTB, was the first number-one instrumental single in Japan's Oricon charts history. He has also occasionally worked on anime and video games, as a composer as well as a scenario writer. In the late 2000s, he reunited once again with YMO, while continuing to compose film music.

Since 78 he has released almost 90 albums (solo & soundtrack) , on top of that 2 dozen collaboration albums and YMO 33 years 110+ albums , every 16 weeks an album for 33 years, amazing workethic, puts lots of artists to shame. The 2007 jpg shows a 55 year old man that has greyed considerably, but he looks sharp and balanced into the lens back at you.

 He is also known as a critic of copyright law, arguing that it is antiquated in the information age. He is a member of anti-nuclear organization Stop Rokkasho. Married life obviously suffered and he has been unattached for most of his career, still he has two daughters one of which has stepped into her parents career (mother=Akiko Yano), the J-pop singer Miu Sakamoto.

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The compilation album, "Soundbytes" contains pieces from Japanese releases including "Ongakku Zuukan" or "Illustrated Music Encyclopedia", "Mirai Yarou" or "Future Dude" (loose translation), "Wings of Honneamise," and others. The tracks from "Future Dude" all deal with Futurism and the movement created in Italy in the 1900's. They contain Italian influences, such as opera music, a speech by Filippo T Marinetti, and mechanical aspects of rhythm such as typewriter clicks, metallic pounding, and pulsating beats like that of an assembly line. All of these help to incorporate the feeling and emotion of the Futurist movement, as well as paint a picture of motion and speed and the mechanical automation of which the Futurists dreames.
Other tracks like M.A.Y. in the backyard are vibrant and individual, fast paced and s! tacatto, with repetitive but complex rhythms. Some tracks are less stressful, like Ulu Watu and Water is Life, with soothing sounds of rain, jungle animals, and Indonesian Gamelan, all helping to create a green jungle feeling. Wonderful compilation of Sakamoto's early eighties work.



Ryuichi Sakamoto - Soundbytes (81–86) (flac 292mb)

01 Bakterial Soup 8:55
02 Relaxed 7:00
03 Soundscape 4:35
04 E. Scape 5:01
05 Elektrical Utility 3:55
06 Elektrical Aktivity 6:59
07 Puzzling Cubes 5:51
08 Worms Are Boring 4:49
09 Carbon Cycle 4:35
10 Dark Life Cycle 5:04
11 Receptor 7:10
12 Fry A Fly 9:58

Ryuichi Sakamoto - Soundbytes (81–86) (ogg  136mb)

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One of Sakamoto's strangest, most uncompromising albums, Esperanto features music written for a dance performance by New Yorker Melissa Fenley. Using weird, clipped samples of ethnic instruments, electronically modified sound bites, and distorted vocals, Sakamoto builds a very icy soundscape that juts out at the listener like pointy modernist architecture. Leaving lots of breathing space in the arrangements for the dancers, this is music that stretches langorously over rhythms and snatches of melody. "Dolphins" is bright and shiny with its synth bursts and backwards notes; "Adelic Penguins" is the closest Sakamoto gets to techno here, with bits and bops of a melody exploding over a propulsive bassline. A far cry from the more symphonic Sakamoto, but equally intriguing.



Ryuichi Sakamoto - Esperanto (flac 180mb)

01 A Wongga Dance Song 6:18
02 The Dreaming 3:52
03 A Rain Song 2:26
04 Dolphins 3:23
05 A Human Tube 4:50
06 Adelic Penguins 6:06
07 A Carved Stone 8:23
08 Ulu Watu 3:55

Ryuichi Sakamoto - Esperanto  (ogg 88mb)

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Sakamoto's all-star blend of Western and Eastern music styles is a triumphant success for the composer, and a consistently good listen. On the title track he takes a traditional Japanese folk song and blends it into a funk groove provided by Bootsy Collins, Bill Laswell, and Sly Dunbar. Unlike Byrne and Eno's My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, this blend of cultures is coming from the opposing angle and stays truer to the source material. But that track is only one of Sakamoto's approaches, and on several other tracks he joins with Laswell to create a crisp, techno-cultural hybrid that sounds like nothing except like pure Sakamoto. On "Risky," a subdued Iggy Pop lends vocals and lyrics, and doesn't come across as an interloper. And on "Okinawa Song," Sakamoto seamlessly integrates the southern island culture into his grand scheme.



Ryuichi Sakamoto - Neo Geo  (flac 202mb)

01 Before Long 1:19
02 Neo Geo 5:08
03 Risky (Voc.Iggy Pop) 5:27
04 Free Trading 5:25
05 Shogunade 4:32
06 Parata 4:21
07 Okinawa Song - Chin Nuku Juushii 5:19
08 After All 3:07

Ryuichi Sakamoto - Neo Geo   (ogg 83mb)

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