Mar 31, 2014

RhoDeo 1413 'Precious' 12

Hello, for most British F1 fans the world is hole once more after their demi-god finally won a race again, it took a far superior engine and a covering team mate to keep that German half-demon at bay, who when his engine is on par again will undoubtely show Hamilton his heels again. That may be many months away so it's essential to score as many points as possible if he wants to be worldchampion again, the over enthousiast fans already drove the odds to close to one, absurd. I for one still give Vettel a 50% chance of retaining his title for a fifth time, it will drive the Hamilton fans to madness should that happen. Meanwhile those that have no knowledge of tinnitus demand the F1 cars should be extremely loud otherwise their simple minds aren't able to project speed ahhh. Seriously all the changes this year haven't resulted in more spectacle yet. It looks that Mercedes who have more than just a racing interest have created a superior engine which probably turn up in some of their customer models in the near future. I wonder if their competitors there (Porsche, Audi, BMW) will reconsider to join F1 again when it becomes such a global engine branding tool as it has become now.


In 1981, the BBC again tackled "The Lord of the Rings", this time in a serial of twenty six 30-minute episodes.  This production was not a condensed version, although it does leave out a number of events. Still, it is about as faithful to the book as one could reasonably expect. The characterizations are excellent and music is very nicely done. The 26-part series was subsequently edited into 13 hour-long episodes broadcast from 17 July to 9 October 1982, restoring some dialogue originally cut for timing (since each hour-long episode is actually around 57 minutes, as opposed to 54 minutes for two half-hour episodes with overlaps and extra credits removed), rearranging some scenes for dramatic impact and adding linking narration and music cues. .  NJoy

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In 1981 the UK radio station BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo installments. The radio series follows the plot of the original novel (revised 1951 version) very closely, except for the addition of The Tale Bearer, a narrator whose account of the story is often interrupted and embellished by the protagonist Bilbo Baggins in the role of secondary narrator. The 1981 trilogy was adapted for radio by Brian Sibley and Michael Bakewell.  It ws directed by Jane Morgan and Penny Leicester.  It is voiced by some very fine British actors including Ian Holm as Frodo, Michael Hordon as Gandalf and Peter Woodthorpe as Gollum among others.

 The 26-part series was subsequently edited into 13 hour-long episodes broadcast from 17 July to 9 October 1982, restoring some dialogue originally cut for timing (since each hour-long episode is actually around 57 minutes, as opposed to 54 minutes for two half-hour episodes with overlaps and extra credits removed), rearranging some scenes for dramatic impact and adding linking narration and music cues.

 The re-edited version was released on both cassette tape and CD sets which also included the soundtrack album (noticeably taken from a vinyl copy). Incidentally, episode 8 of the series, The Voice of Saruman was labelled as The Voice of Sauron on the cassette & CD box sets.

 Cast and credits

 Narrator: Gerard Murphy
 Frodo Baggins: Ian Holm
 Gandalf the Grey/Gandalf the White: Michael Hordern
 Aragorn (Strider): Robert Stephens
 Sam Gamgee: Bill Nighy
 Meriadoc Brandybuck (Merry): Richard O'Callaghan
 Peregrin Took (Pippin): John McAndrew
 Legolas: David Collings
 Gimli: Douglas Livingstone
 Boromir: Michael Graham Cox
 Galadriel: Marian Diamond
 Celeborn: Simon Cadell
 Arwen Evenstar: Sonia Fraser
 Saruman the White: Peter Howell
 Elrond: Hugh Dickson
 Bilbo Baggins: John Le Mesurier
 Gollum/Sméagol: Peter Woodthorpe

 Dramatisation: Brian Sibley and Michael Bakewell
 Music: Stephen Oliver
 Radiophonic sound: Elizabeth Parker
 Produced and directed by Jane Morgan and Penny Leicester

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Lord Of The Rings 12 - The Mount Doom (58:03  67mb)

12-01 Opening Titles 7:07
12-02 Naked In the Dark 11:14
12-03 The Mouth of Sauron 8:36
12-04 The Ring is Mine 4:26
12-05 The Bitter End 14:18
12-06 The White Trees of Numenor 6:37
12-07 As a Father You Were to Me 5:41

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previously

Lord Of The Rings 01 - The Shadow Of The Past (56 min 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 02 - The Black Riders (56 min 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 03 - The Knife In The Dark (57 min 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 04 - The Ring Goes South (55 min 63mb)
Lord Of The Rings 05 - The Mirror Of Galadriel (55 min 64mb)
Lord Of The Rings 06 - The Breaking Of The Fellowship (65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 07 - The Breaking Of The Fellowship (55:25 64mb)
Lord Of The Rings 08 - The Voice Of Saruman (56:42 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 09 - The Two Towers (58:55 67mb)
Lord Of The Rings 10 - The Choices Of Master Samwise (59:07 68mb)
Lord Of The Rings 11 - The Battle Of Pelennor Fields (57:13  66mb)

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Mar 30, 2014

Sundaze 1413

Hello, as N.W. Europe basks in the sunshine with temps of 20 C on average, it's time for that biorhythm disturber again, daylight saving time ahhh when you wake up tomorrow it will be an hour later than you think..shocker! Yes there's more heart attacks during these biorhythm disturbers but at least with the fine weather you get to enjoy your terrace beer an hour longer. Apparently the US isn't syncing but hey that country has some much more outrageously backward ways. Yet they remain immensely proud of their stupidities, all enabled on the basis of creating endless amounts of dollars everyone else is forced to accept as a bribe or else expect a serious death threat. After all that's why they spend all that papermoney on ...murder machines that validate the dollar.


With the means to create and distribute music having been 'democratized' this last decade a guy from Moscow made his move to break free from anonymity.The music today is rather chilled which certainly can be enjoyed whilst dozing in the sunshine as well Treat yourselves again.......... N'Joy

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Well I have to make note of the fact that like last weeks artist today's composer is lacking the same ego drive, clearly these eastern European previously communist societies spawn quiet a different mindset, compared to our ego driven west world, and its not so much about making money as it is about creating art. These eastern european artists are virtually anonymous and although they have fine websites, there's not a beep about themselves, no context about how and where they create, who's inspiring them. One could say they are naive or maybe ignorant, fact it they are not helping themselves if they wanted to breakthrough into the west. The quality of their work is outstanding alas that can't be said of their management/marketing.

Fellirium is the moniker of Andrey Vasilyev - russian musician from Moscow, Russian Federation. Fellirium is an ambient / Experimental music project, focusing on various music in the field of ambient music, ranging from the ambient space Light to Dark Experimental Forms with Neo-Classical Influences.  Andrey supports free music and releases his works under Creative Commons License.

This is all the info i could find on todays artist despite releasing more than a dozen albums, then i came across a chat discussion at relaxmachinery where he answers a number of questions. Posted on November 13, 2010 at 2:23am

I) Why do you create music/art?

 To be honest - I don't know. I just like it, and I even NEED it. When I was a little kid, I liked to draw and imagine lots of strange things and stories. When I grew up, I tried to write something. Short ысш-аш stories, novels, etc. I liked it. I like this feeling I get everytime when I create something, when I made something you can feel, but can not touch... Well, I don't know how to describe it anyway. Now I write music, and I think that it's mine. Music is the way I can express myself, go away from reality, clear my mind, get lots of good feeling and emotions. And - who knows - maybe my music can make some other person feel and see something similar to what I feel and see.

 II) What moods, perspectives, and/or messages are you usually trying to convey when you create music/art?

 Well, actually, I don't try to convey moods or meessages. I'd say I try to convey images, feelings and atmospheres of some certain places out of this reality. My music, as I conceive it, is a little bit escapist.

 III) How do you see your music in comparison to the mainstream genre?

 My music isn't mainstream. Although it is also not the deepest uderground. I will never be popular and I don't need it anyway.

 IV) What is more important to you when you create? a) Getting your own point across or b) Leaving room for interpretation?

 If you take ambient genre for example, it is music for imagination and interpretation, so, my music is certainly leaving room for it. But it also shows my own point through tracks' titles and albums' titles.

 V) Who/what moves or inspires you?

 I take my inspiration from the nature and almost everything around me. Trees, skies, ponds and rivers, houses, distant lights in the night city and so on... Everything created by nature (and by human sometimes) in this world is very beautiful and inspiring, and when I admire it, I hear the music.
 But also some music from my favourite artist is also inspires me, but not as much as nature.

 VI) Would you consider your work to be sincere? If so, why?

 I don't know. But some of mine friends that my work is very sincere, because they reveal my soul, feelings and thoughts (I'm kinda introvert and usually you're don't see all of this). I don't know it is really or not. May the listeners decide.

 VII) What defines as being "good music/art" to you?

 Good music and art for me are music and art that I like or, if I don't like, I respect. It could be very powerful, beautiful and touching, but it couldn't touch my heart or my soul, and because of it I don't like it. But I see it's power, it's beauty, and I acknowledge it.

 VIII) Would you say that musicians/artists become or are good more due to gifts & talents or practice & dedication to hone their craft?

 You can say anything, but I think talent is nothing without practice, so I think both verions together will make artists and musucian good. Of course, there are exceptions when talent or in the other way, practice takes lead. But I think it happens rather seldom

 IX) What do you hope to achieve from what you create?

 Nothing. I just do what I like. That's all. Fame? I don't need it. If I'll be famous then it will be side effect of my activity, not my goal.
 Money? Well, I'm in need of money right now, but I don't want to take money for my music. Music must be free. Even if my music will be on CD some day, I think all money from sales will go to some fund.
 So, I create music because I like to and I don't try to achieve anything.

 X) What effects have you seen your work have on others?

 Well, I don't meet with my listeners, and I don't get much response. I receive e-mail's and comments on the Internet sometimes, where people say that they like my music, but I can't tell what effects exactly my work has on them. But I knew one guy who loved one of my tracks so much, that he listened it over and over again, and again, and again... One day when I visited his last.fm profile page I saw that he listened those track about two thousand times in a row! Oh my god, I've never thought that somebody will love my music so much. But, unfortunatelly, he doesn't liked my other stuff that much. :)

 XI) Where do you think you would be in life if music/art was non-existent? Why?

 Well, I would be in the same spot where I am now, except I wouldn't write music (and listen to it, if it was non-existent). I am not a famous musician whose life consists only of music. Music is some sort of hobby for me (but, to be honest, it is actually something more than just a hobby). And if it was non-existent, well, okay - I would find a new one.

 XII) It has been said many times that musicians are the most creative when they are drug addicts, or as the old saying goes, "No junk, no soul.". In your opinion, do you think that certain drugs aid in the creative process? If so, why?

 Drugs are bad! I've never tried them and I've never will. And I don't like when someone says that ambient music is music for the drug-addicts and it could be listened only when you high. Damn, where does these thoughts comes from?!
 I think ambient music is better than any drug. When I listen to Steve Roach, Robert Rich, Vidna Obmana, Alio Die and other good musicians, it takes me to other world and push me into some sort of trance. It also happen when I create music, thus I don't need any drugs for stimulating creative process. If you need them - bad for you.

 XIII) It used to be every band's dream to get signed onto a record label & now it seems as though bands prefer the freedom of working independently. Why do you think that is?

 Because major labels steal your soul. :)
 Well, when there was no Internet, bands and musicians had no chance to be heard without labels. They could hardly survive by only self-releases and labels was the only way to made a good record, promote yourself and find some fans.
 Now, when everyone can listen what they want and freely get it, labels lose their weight. Why bother searching for label, tuning to its rules and demands, when you can do what you want and like to do, and distribute and promote it by yourself through the Internet?

 XIV) What impact has the record industry had on music throughout the years?

 I don't know what to answer. :)

 XV) Would you consider it to be a fair statement that mainstream music is made more for the sake of acquiring money than for the genuine desire to create, and that underground musicians are the opposite?

 Again, there are lots of exceptions, but I think I agree with it, although there are mainstream artist who make music for deaire to create, and underground musicians who make music only for mone (in last years it's escpecially visible).

 XVI) The internet has, without question, changed how we look at music. It makes it much easier for underground musicians to spread the word about their work. On the other hand, it also makes it possible to download music for free from torrent websites. Overall, do you think that the internet has, and will, hinder or aid underground musicians?

 It depends on what purpose you have. If you want to make money, then it will certainly hinder you. But for musicians like me it is aid, without doubt.


Discography_
 
Insomnia (07)
Concrete Purgatory ‎(07)
Cellular Structure (07)
Unreleased Tracks (08)
Emerald (08)
Sapphire (08)
The Long Winter  (08)
Monochrome World (08)
Temple Of The Moon (08)
Untitled I (09)
Untitled II (09)
Beyond The Dream (09)
Ruby (09)
Fleurs D'Hiver (09)
Joint Universe (10)
Amethyst ‎(10)
Nightfall ‎(11)
Remembrance ‎(14)

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Dedication to the winter.  First album with accent on melody. Drones and sounds with simple melodies played on electric piano creates the atmosphere of the long and cold winter.  Bonus track 'Song for the fox' is the improvisation played live.  Unreleased Tracks, a collection of old previously unreleased and unused tracks.  Various styles of ambient: space, tribal, drone and dark ambient.



Fellirium - The Long Winter + Unreleased Tracks (flac 413mb)

01 Snowfall 6:29
02 Frozen River 7:25
03 Forest Sleeps 8:26
04 Cold Wind Blows 6:24
05 The Long Winter 9:05
06 Under The Snow 13:20
07 Song For The Fox (Live Improvisation) 3:56
Unreleased Tracks
08 Untitled 8:41
09 Untitled 11:13
10 Untitled 3:12
11 Untitled 3:58
12 Untitled 5:36
13 Untitled 4:41
14 Untitled 5:57
15 Untitled 7:07
16 Untitled 10:26

Fellirium - The Long Winter + Unreleased Tracks (ogg 224mb)

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Temple of the Moon is a deep, magnificent collection of ambient space music by one of our favorite artists ever. Hailing from Russia, Fellirium is one of those rare musicians who never repeats themselves and yet makes magic every time. 'Temple of the moon' is a collection of deep space ambient pieces. Abstract electronic ambient with floating sound textures and mystical atmosphere. Simply beautiful. With a soft and delicate Glowing Mushroom as bonus (from the duo release with Wialenove Earth/Space)



Fellirium - Temple of the Moon (flac  238mb)

01 I 5:31
02 II 6:54
03 III 7:38
04 IV 6:02
05 V 10:23
06 VI 7:43
07 VII 6:44

08 Glowing Mushroom 10:34

Fellirium - Temple of the Moon (ogg 109mb)

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'Fleurs d'Hiver', like 'The Long Winter', dedicated to winter, and inspired by winter photos by Florent Tissier. Soothing and dark, noisy and light experimental electronic ambient with electric piano. Reflections is a mixture of dark drones and heavy sounds, extracted from guitar and piano, with light ambient textures and electronic rhythms.



Fellirium - Fleurs d'Hiver + Reflections (flac 355mb)

1 Invisible Companion 7:21
2 Thin Ice 5:10
3 February 6:02
4 Cold 6:50
5 Flowers Of Winter 8:02
6 Whisper Of Trees 8:54

7 Reflections 21:04

Fellirium - Fleurs d'Hiver + Reflections (ogg 121mb)

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Mar 29, 2014

RhoDeo 1412 Beats

Hello, just 2 more weeks before internetcriminals will swoop in to take XP users hostage, yes without almighty Microsoft protecting us the end is neigh for XP users that still haven't shelled out their money to upgrade to one of their backward but newer operating systems. I tried 7 2 years ago i found it frustratingly stupid-and im not a whiz, read a lot of agonizing reviews of 8, apparently 8.1 has softened those blows somewhat. Seriously if you want an XP like experience you should go for Linux Ubuntu 12.04 LTS it's a long-term support release. It has continuous hardware support improvements as well as guaranteed security and support updates until April 2017. For the latest features,
choose Ubuntu 13.10 it will be supported for 9 months. There's many more linux versions, one other popular one with good reviews is linuxmint-16-cinnamon-dvd-32bit(or 64bit) tailored to user-friendliness for desktop users. Linux is not for geeks that may have been  the case 5 years ago, but the current Linux desktop are easy to install and use (comparable to XP) much more stable and faster and much less a target for the virus makers, on top of all these benefits it's free ! Although i'm beginning to think that in the mind of average Joe and Jane this somehow makes Linux suspicious, don't be -make the switch or run it paralel to Windows.

These months French rule the beats and they have plenty to offer even though not that much reaches the world as  the music scene is rather dominated by the Anglo - American music industry. Meanwhile the French enjoyed themselves in their own niche so to speak, and they did rather well. Today a French electronic music duo consisting of musicians Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter. They reached significant popularity in the late 1990s house movement in France and met with continued success in the years following, combining elements of house with synthpop. The duo is credited with producing songs that are considered essential in the French house scene. They are known for emphasis on using visual and story components associated with their musical productions. They've managed to get the US media in a frenzy and last year did more for the global economy than most politicians do in a lifetime...get lucky  N'joy

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In similar company with new-school French progressive dance artists such as Motorbass, Air, Cassius, and Dimitri from Paris, Parisian duo Daft Punk quickly rose to acclaim by adapting a love for first-wave acid house and techno to their younger roots in pop, indie rock, and hip-hop. The combined talents of DJs Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter, the pair's first projects together included Darling, a voiceless indie cover band; their current recording name derives from a review in U.K. music weekly Melody Maker of a compilation tape Darling were featured on, released by Krautrock revivalists Stereolab (their lo-fi D.I.Y. cover of a Beach Boys song was derided as "daft punk"). Subsequently ditching the almost inevitable creative cul-de-sac of rock for the more appealing rush of the dancefloor, the pair released their debut single, "The New Wave," in 1993 on the celebrated Soma label. Instantly hailed by the dance music press as the work of a new breed of house innovators, the single was followed by "Da Funk," the band's first true hit (the record sold 30,000 copies worldwide and saw thorough rinsings by everyone from Kris Needs to the Chemical Brothers).

Although the group had only released a trio of singles ("The New Wave" and "Da Funk," as well as the 1996 limited pressing of "Musique"), in early 1996 Daft Punk were the subject of a minor bidding war. The group eventually signed with Virgin, with its first long-player, Homework, appearing early the following year (a brief preview of the album, "Musique," was also featured on the Virgin compilation Wipeout XL next to tracks from Photek, Future Sound of London, the Chemical Brothers, and Source Direct). As with the earlier singles, the group's sound is a brazen, dancefloor-oriented blend of progressive house, funk, electro, and techno, with sprinklings of hip-hop-styled breakbeats and excessive, crowd-firing samples similar to other anthemic dance-fusion acts such as the Chemical Brothers and Monkey Mafia. In addition to his role in Daft Punk, Bangalter operates the Roulé label and has recorded under his own name (the underground smash "Trax on da Rocks") as well as Stardust (the huge club/commercial hit "Music Sounds Better with You").

After four long years of fans eagerly awaiting a follow-up to their brilliant debut, Daft Punk finally issued Discovery in March 2001. The live record Alive 1997 followed at the end of the year, and a by-now predictable four-year wait preceded the release of Human After All in early 2005. One year later, Daft Punk released a compilation, Musique, Vol. 1: 1993-2005, and in 2007 their second live record, Alive 2007, arrived. The album and its single "Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger" won Grammy Awards early in 2009; shortly after, at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con, it was announced that the duo composed 24 tracks for the film Tron: Legacy. Daft Punk's score was arranged and orchestrated by Joseph Trapanese. The band collaborated with him for two years on the score, from pre-production to completion. Daft Punk's music for the movie was released in November 2010, shortly before the film arrived in theaters. The members of Daft Punk also make a cameo appearance as disc jockey programs wearing their trademark robot masks within the film's virtual world. Tron: Legacy --  Walt Disney Records released a remix album of the score titled Tron: Legacy Reconfigured on 5 April 2011.

Daft Punk worked on their fourth studio album, Random Access Memories in collaboration with singer-songwriter Paul Williams and Chic frontman Nile Rodgers. In May 2012 it was also announced that Giorgio Moroder had collaborated with the duo, recording a monologue about his life in a vocal booth containing microphones ranging from 1960 to present day. In January 2013, de Homem-Christo revealed that Daft Punk was in the process of signing with Sony Music Entertainment through the Columbia Records label, and that the album would have a spring release. A report from The Guardian followed specifying a release date of May 2013.  On 3 April, the official album website launched The Collaborators, a series of 16mm documentary videos about the album.

On 12 April, a video preview for the song "Get Lucky", in which Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers appear, was played at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. The radio edit of the song was released as a digital download single on 19 April 2013. "Get Lucky" became Daft Punk's first UK No. 1 single on 28 April 2013 remaining at number one for 4 weeks (as of 24 May) and the Spotify music streaming website reported that the song is the most-streamed new song in the service's history. For the 56th Annual Grammy Awards, Random Access Memories was awarded the Grammy for Best Dance/Electronica Album, Album of the Year and Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical, while "Get Lucky" received the Grammy for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance and the Record of the Year. Daft Punk also performed a medley at the ceremony with Rodgers, Pharrell, and Stevie Wonder of "Get Lucky", "Le Freak", "Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger", "Another Star", "Lose Yourself to Dance", and "Around the World".

Their outward personae have also changed over time. In one the duo's earliest magazine appearances, de Homem-Christo stated in a Jockey Slut interview that, "We don't want to be photographed. [...] We don't especially want to be in magazines. During their Homework years, the duo would usually wear masks to hide their appearance. In their more visible Discovery years, they appeared wearing robotic headgear and metallic gloves for publicity photo shoots, interviews, live shows and music videos. The helmets were produced by Paul Hahn of Daft Arts and the French directors Alex and Martin, the duo who also designed them. Daft Punk have said that they donned their robot masks to easily merge the characteristics of humans and machines. However, Bangalter later stated that the costumes were initially the result of shyness. "But then it became exciting from the audience's point of view. It's the idea of being an average guy with some kind of superpower." When asked whether the duo expressed themselves differently within the robotic suits, Bangalter stated "No, we don't need to. It's not about having inhibitions. It's more like an advanced version of glam, where it's definitely not you." With the release of Human After All, the musical duo's outfits became slightly less complicated by consisting of black leather jacket and pants and simplified versions of the Discovery headgear.
It can be said that the mystery of their identity and the elaborate nature of their disguises has added to their popularity. Anonimity and media events a strange mix that has payed of for them big time, and they can walk the streets without bother. It sure sets them apart from the rest of the music world.


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Four long years after their debut, Homework, Daft Punk returned with a second full-length, also packed with excellent productions and many of the obligatory nods to the duo's favorite stylistic speed bumps of the 1970s and '80s. Discovery is by no means the same record, though. Deserting the shrieking acid house hysteria of their early work, the album moves in the same smooth filtered disco circles as the European dance smashes ("Music Sounds Better with You" and "Gym Tonic") that were co-produced by DP's Thomas Bangalter during the group's long interim. If Homework was Daft Punk's Chicago house record, this is definitely the New York garage edition, with co-productions and vocals from Romanthony and Todd Edwards, two of the brightest figures based in New Jersey's fertile garage scene. Also in common with classic East Coast dance and '80s R&B, Discovery surprisingly focuses on songwriting and concise productions, though the pair's visions of bucolic pop on "Digital Love" and "Something About Us" are delivered by an androgynous, vocoderized frontman singing trite (though rather endearing) love lyrics. "One More Time," the irresistible album opener and first single, takes Bangalter's "Music Sounds Better with You" as a blueprint, blending sampled horns with some retro bass thump and the gorgeous, extroverted vocals of Romanthony going round and round with apparently endless tweakings. Though "Aerodynamic" and "Superheroes" have a bit of the driving acid minimalism associated with Homework, here Daft Punk is more taken with the glammier, poppier sound of Eurodisco and late R&B. Abusing their pitch-bend and vocoder effects as though they were going out of style (about 15 years too late, come to think of it), the duo loops nearly everything they can get their sequencers on -- divas, vocoders, synth-guitars, electric piano -- and conjures a sound worthy of bygone electro-pop technicians from Giorgio Moroder to Todd Rundgren to Steve Miller. Daft Punk are such stellar, meticulous producers that they make any sound work, even superficially dated ones like spastic early-'80s electro/R&B ("Short Circuit") or faux-orchestral synthesizer baroque ("Veridis Quo"). The only crime here is burying the highlight of the entire LP near the end. "Face to Face," a track with garage wunderkind Todd Edwards, twists his trademarked split-second samples and fully fragmented vision of garage into a dance-pop hit that could've easily stormed the charts in 1987. Daft Punk even manage a sense of humor about their own work, closing with a ten-minute track aptly titled "Too Long."



Daft Punk - Discovery ( 415mb)

01 One More Time 5:21
02 Aerodynamic 3:27
03 Digital Love 4:58
04 Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger 3:43
05 Crescendolls 3:28
06 Nightvision 1:43
07 Superheroes 3:57
08 High Life 3:13
09 Something About Us 3:50
10 Voyager 3:46
11 Veridis Quo 5:44
12 Short Circuit 3:24
13 Face To Face 3:58
14 Too Long 10:00

Daft Punk - Discovery  (ogg 157mb)

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Daft Punk's version of a remix album is far better than most of its ilk, but far worse than either of their previous production albums or their live record. But first off, agreeing to remix Daft Punk counts as an act of high hubris for most producers; the duo is responsible for some of the most innovative productions ("Musique," "Revolution 909," "Aerodynamic") and remixes ("Mothership Reconnection," "Disco Cubism," "Chord Memory") of recent years. But fresh blood is always intriguing, and the acts hired out to post-produce for 2001's Discovery LP were widely varied and highly talented. Unfortunately, few of the big names tapped turn in tracks equal to their name. Although Basement Jaxx's version of "Phoenix" (the only track originally taken from Daft Punk's debut album) is a mostly successful translation of DP-style robot disco into Basement Jaxx's vision of sensual house, the Neptunes' remix of "Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger" is an unintentionally nerdy lounge tune, Detroit trio Slum Village's sampling (literally) of "Aerodynamic" becomes a hip-hop album track, and Romanthony's unplugged version of his own feature "One More Time" neatly destroys the magic of the original. Filling in the gaps nicely, however, are lesser-known French upstarts like Jess & Crabbe and Cosmo Vitelli as well as mainstream house mastermind Boris Dlugosch, whose "Digital Love" wisely changes very little of the original.



Daft Punk - Daft Club (flac 490mb)

01 Ouverture 2:40
02 Aerodynamic (Daft Punk Remix) 6:10
03 Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger (The Neptunes Remix) 5:11
04 Face To Face (Cosmo Vitelli Remix) 4:54
05 Phoenix (Basement Jaxx Remix) 7:53
06 Digital Love (Boris Dlugosh Remix) 7:30
07 Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger (Jess & Crabbe Remix) 6:01
08 Face To Face (Demon Remix) 6:59
09 Crescendolls (Laidback Luke Remix) 5:25
10 Aerodynamic (Slum Village Remix) 3:37
11 Too Long (Gonzales Version) 3:13
12 Aerodynamite 7:48
13 One More Time (Romanthony's Unplugged) 3:40
14 Something About Us (Love Theme From Interstella 5555) 2:15

Daft Punk - Daft Club (ogg 181mb)

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French house producer Thomas Bangalter made a name for himself in the global dance community as part of the highly successful duo Daft Punk, which also features his longtime friend, Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo. However, in addition to his work as Daft Punk, Bangalter also started the Roulé label, on which he released several 12"s by himself as well as other noteworthy house producers like Roy Davis Jr. and Romanthony. Among his own productions released on Roulé was a collaboration with Alan Braxe and vocalist Benjamin Diamond as Stardust. The resulting production, "Music Sounds Better With You," became not only one of the most successful dance singles of 1998 but also undoubtedly one of the most popular anthems of the late '90s.

Thomas Bangalter composed the score for the Gaspar Noé film Irreversible, a vividly realistic horror thriller containing brutal assault and rape scenes that reportedly caused hundreds to leave and dozens to faint after its viewing at the Cannes Film Festival. Although Bangalter's productions never previously showed the emotional range to make film work viable, he ably captures a spirit of approaching menace throughout the score. He appears to know much about film music, at least the narrow section from his own lifetime; from the first few notes of the title track, he shows a clear familiarity with the gist of horror classic soundtracks like John Carpenter's Halloween, Goblin's Suspiria, and Tangerine Dream's Sorcerer. "Stress" and "Paris By Night" could've been recorded 20 years earlier, while "Outrage" merges Daft Punk-style French disco with the one-note malevolence of horror soundtracks. For those wanting to hear more of Bangalter's glossy disco, the best candidates are four productions that first appeared up to eight years earlier on 12" releases for the Roulé label: "Spinal Scratch," "Outrun," "Extra Dry," and "Ventura/Into the Tunnel" (other than a few scattered mix albums, they make their CD debut here). This record runs the gamut from dark, deeply disturbing ambient tracks, to fast-driving, funky french house beats. The soundtrack also includes some classical music tracks as well, great to use for intros in a mix.



Thomas Bangalter - Irréversible (O.S.T.) (flac 420mb)

1 Irréversible 6:32
2 Tempus Edax Rerum 1:15
3 Symphony N° 9 In D Major - Adagio (Gustav Mahler) 1:50
4 Rectum 6:23
5 Night Beats 2:18
6 Stress 6:43
7 Paris By Night 6:08
8 Outrage 6:29
9 Outrun 5:43
10 Spinal Scratch 6:30
11 Extra Dry 4:58
12 Désaccords 3:50
13 Ventura / Into The Tunnel 5:48
14 Mon Manège A Moi (Etienne Daho) 3:51
15 Symphony N° 7 In A Major Op. 92 (Ludwig van Beethoven) 3:24
16 The End 1:11

Thomas Bangalter - Irréversible (O.S.T.)  (ogg 157mb)

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Mar 27, 2014

RhoDeo 1412 Goldy Rhox 153

Hello, today the 153nd post of GoldyRhox, classic pop rock in the darklight are an American rock singer-songwriter who first rose to fame in the late 1960s as the lead singer of the psychedelic-acid rock band Big Brother and the Holding Company, and later as a solo artist with her own backing groups, The Kozmic Blues Band and The Full Tilt Boogie Band. She was one of the more popular acts at the Monterey Pop Festival and later became one of the major attractions to the Woodstock festival and the Festival Express train tour. She charted five singles, and other popular songs from her four-year solo career include "Down on Me", "Summertime", "Piece of My Heart", "Ball 'n' Chain", "Maybe", "To Love Somebody", "Kozmic Blues", "Work Me, Lord", "Cry Baby", "Mercedes Benz", and her only number one hit, "Me and Bobby McGee".

On October 4, 1970, producer Paul A. Rothchild became concerned when On October 4, 1970, producer Paul A. Rothchild became concerned when today's singer failed to show up at Sunset Sound Recorders for a recording session. Full Tilt Boogie's road manager, John Cooke, drove to the Landmark Motor Hotel in Hollywood where Janis was staying. He saw today's singer' psychedelically painted Porsche 356C Cabriolet in the parking lot. Upon entering her room, he found her dead on the floor beside her bed. The official cause of death was an overdose of heroin, possibly compounded by alcohol. Cooke believes that she had accidentally been given heroin that was much more potent than normal, as several of her dealer's other customers also overdosed that week. (More victims from the war on drugs).

She was well known for her performing abilities, and her fans referred to her stage presence as "electric". At the height of her career, she was known as "The Queen of Psychedelic Soul," and became known as Pearl among her friends. She was also a painter, dancer and music arranger. Rolling Stone ranked her number 46 on its list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004, and number 28 on its 2008 list of 100 Greatest Singers of All Time. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Today's mystery album was released August 12, 1968 is the second studio album released by today's singer. For her first major studio recording, today's singer played a major role in the arrangement and production of the recordings that would become Big Brother and the Holding Company's second album, Cheap Thrills. During the recording, Joplin was said to be the first person to enter the studio and the last person to leave. Footage of today's singer and the band in the studio shows today's singer in great form and taking charge during the recording for "Summertime". The album featured a cover design by counterculture cartoonist Robert Crumb. Although Cheap Thrills sounded as if it consisted of concert recordings, like on "Combination of the Two" and "I Need a Man to Love", only "Ball and Chain" was actually recorded in front of a paying audience; the rest of the tracks were studio recordings. The album had a raw quality, including the sound of a cocktail glass breaking and the broken shards being swept away during the song "Turtle Blues".

The cover was drawn by underground cartoonist Robert Crumb after the band's original cover idea, a picture of the group naked in bed together, was dropped by the record company. Crumb had originally intended his art for the LP back cover, with a portrait of our singer to grace the front. But she—an avid fan of underground comics, especially the work of Crumb—so loved the illustration that she demanded Columbia Records place it on the front cover. It is number nine on Rolling Stone's list of one hundred greatest album covers.

Today's mystery album was a great success, hitting #1 on the charts for eight nonconsecutive weeks in 1968. By the end of the year it was the most successful album of 1968, having sold nearly a million copies, it produced very popular hits with "Piece of My Heart" and "Summertime".  In 2003, the album was ranked #338 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It is also listed in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[6] On March 22, 2013, the album was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the Library of Congress and thus it was preserved into the National Recording Registry for the 2012 register. Here today in its remastered and extended version.





Goldy Rhox 153   (flac 328mb)

Goldy Rhox 153   (ogg 128mb)


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Mar 26, 2014

RhoDeo 1412 Aetix

Hello, more news from Farcebook today , after gobbling up the popular What's App earlier now his greedyness considered buying the popular Oculus Rift virtual reality platform. The company, who in 2012 was boosted by 2 million Kickstarter funds, is now in the billionaire hands of Marc Zuckerberg "After games, we're going to make Oculus a platform for many other experiences. Imagine enjoying a court side seat at a game, studying in a classroom of students and teachers all over the world or consulting with a doctor face-to-face — just by putting on goggles in your home, The future is coming and we have a chance to build it together. I can't wait to start working with the whole team at Oculus to bring this future to the world, and to unlock new worlds for all of us." (for the right price that is). The technology, which features a head-mounted display and motion-tracking sensors, caught the attention of John Carmack, the co-creator of the Doom video game series who evangelised the concept to the rest of the games industry. More than 60,000 developer versions of the headset have been sold and dozens of games already support the technology. The device is not expected to be available to the public until early 2015.

The idea behind today's band started as only a recording project. The plan was to record 15 LPs in 10 years without touring or promotion. Main man Sage thought that the mystique built from the lack of playing traditional rock 'n' roll would make people listen to their recordings much deeper with only their imagination to go by. He thought it would be easy to avoid press, shows, pictures and interviews. He looked at music as art rather than entertainment; he thought music was personal to the listener rather than a commodity. A slower, prettier, spacier, moodier Sage emerges here, and undertones produced by his magical playing separate him from all previously mining this field. The more deliberate pace gives Sage's virtuoso guitar skills even more opportunity to bob and weave, stab and stun, float and tickle, tease and torment. As usual, words are kept to the minimum, to-the-point ideas brought home by evocative textures, singular guitar-lead style, and that spooky, chagrined, warning voice. ....N'Joy

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Misunderstood, mistreated, underrated, and/or just plain unknown, Greg Sage should be mentioned in the first breaths about trailblazing guitarists and U.S. independent music of the '80s and '90s. Since forming his band, Wipers, in Portland, OR, in the late '70s, Sage has been put through the ringer more than enough to justify his hermetic operating methods and attitude. While most of his devout fans consider it a travesty that his name isn't as known as a contemporary like Bob Mould or even an unabashed fan-boy turned legend like Kurt Cobain, Sage would likely retort that it's not for the notoriety that he began making music. Unlike most other musicians who gain inspiration and motivation from watching their favorite stars revel in popularity and idol worship, Sage's inspiration stemmed more from the joy he got from cutting records on his own lathe. He has been more than content to remain in the underground, retaining optimum control over his own career while lending production help and support to younger bands that look to him for his guidance. Throughout his lengthy and prolific career, he has downplayed or shunned any attention or recognition given to him, preferring to let the music speak for itself.

Initialized with the intent of being a recording project and not a band in the truest sense, Sage formed Wipers in 1977 with drummer Sam Henry and bassist Doug Koupal. Sage's original goal was to release 15 records in ten years, free of traditional band aspects like touring and photo shoots. However, he found out early on that being involved with independent labels involved plenty of compromise -- and that independent labels took a great deal of independence away from him, rather than empowering him.

After a debut 7" on Sage's Trap label (an outlet that Sage also used to release a pair of Portland scene compilations), Wipers recorded Is This Real? on a four-track recorder (free of overdubs) in their rehearsal space. Park Avenue Records was willing to release it, but they insisted that Sage and company re-record everything in a professional studio. Despite the relatively polished outcome, Is This Real? remained the group's rawest and most direct outing. It was full of Sage's raging but agile guitars and what would become his trademark songwriting style, dealing with extreme isolation, confusion, and frustration with an agitated sense of melody. 14 years after its release, Sub Pop picked up the record and reissued it without any involvement from Sage.

Prior to the recording of the group's finest moment, 1981's Youth of America, Henry left to join Napalm Beach. Koupal stayed on long enough to play on a couple of the album's songs but left the band to move to Ohio; Brad Davidson moved in to play bass and Brad Naish took over on drums. Having been unimpressed by the professional studio experience, Sage took it upon himself to record and engineer everything by himself. The move paid off, resulting in a furiously spirited but brief LP full of extended passages that allowed Sage to flex his astounding skills on guitar without sounding like a showoff.

For 1982's excellent Over the Edge, the structures of the songs tightened, the pop sensibility hit full stride. As a result, "Romeo" and "Over the Edge" each sustained a fair amount of radio play in the U.S., thanks to a few stations that were developing play lists that would later be identified as alternative or modern rock. Another factor in Wipers' somewhat increased exposure had to do with the better distribution of their new label, Restless. Before Over the Edge's release, Sage fell out with Park Avenue on a number of unresolved issues. The next studio record, Land of the Lost, didn't appear until 1986. During the lull between studio time, the band toured, Sage released his first solo album (1985's hushed Straight Ahead), and the band released a self-titled live album. Naish left the group in 1985 and was replaced by Steve Plouf. Follow Blind came out in 1987 and The Circle followed in 1988. Aside from some slight production nuances and the occasional dabbling with stylistic curveballs, the three studio albums between 1986 and 1988 more or less swam in the wake of the first three but are far from embarrassments.

A 1989 tour was accompanied with an announcement from Sage that Wipers would be ending. The end result of mounting frustrations with the independent music business and the fact that the band had lost the lease on a studio space they had devoted three years to developing, Sage packed up and headed for Phoenix to remain close to his mother. He left a town that he couldn't get arrested in, let alone reviewed. Plouf came along to Arizona (Davidson married, moved to London, and sporadically played with the Jesus & Mary Chain), and Sage built a fully operational studio in his new hideout. He recorded a second solo record, Sacrifice (For Love), and released it in 1991.

Meanwhile, several alternative rockers became vocal about their admiration for Sage. The most notable was Kurt Cobain, whose band Nirvana covered Wipers songs and asked Sage to open for them on tours. Never wanting to be opportunistic and never wanting to draw attention to himself, Sage politely turned down the offers. Sage would also reason that the timing was never right, as he and Plouf had trouble securing a bassist who would be willing to learn over 100 songs and tour unglamorously to little fanfare. Sage himself was never a fan of touring; trudging through the States to promote records had been nothing but one nightmare after another, he never got a thrill from the attention that comes with being a frontman, and only a couple towns -- specifically Boston and Chicago -- were regularly supportive. Wipers enjoyed most of their touring success in Europe, where they were treated with much more respect and filled theaters holding a couple thousand fans.

With a 1993 tribute record called Fourteen Songs for Greg Sage & the Wipers floating around, the Sup Pop reissue of the first record, and the attendant exposure gained from them, Sage effectively squashed any steam his "career" was gaining by releasing Silver Sail in 1995, a Wipers record that hardly resembled the storming fury that made his back catalog suddenly revered. And then, once the attention waned, Sage and Plouf returned to their '80s aggression with 1996's The Herd. Three years later, the duo unleashed Power in One on Sage's new Zeno label. In 2001, Sage used his own label to release a three-for-one package of Wipers' first three albums. Remastered with plenty of bonus tracks, it's probably one of the most unselfish moves committed by a musician. Electric Medicine, Sage's third solo record, came in 2002.

Influence and legacy

Sage later remarked on their initial reception: "We weren’t even really a punk band. See, we were even farther out in left field than the punk movement because we didn’t even wish to be classified, and that was kind of a new territory. ... When we put out Is This Real? … it definitely did not fit in; none of our records did. Then nine, ten years later people are saying: 'Yeah, it’s the punk classic of the ’80s.'" Wipers became better known after the wildly popular grunge band Nirvana covered two songs from Is This Real?, "D-7" and "Return of the Rat". Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain spoke of being heavily influenced by the band. The Wipers were a major influence on the grunge music scene in general, with bands such as The Melvins, Mudhoney, and Dinosaur Jr. citing them. Wipers albums like Is This Real? and Over the Edge are now widely considered to be among the greatest and most influential punk albums of all time.

In 1992, a tribute album Eight Songs for Greg Sage and the Wipers was released by the Tim/Kerr label on four colored 7-inch records, featuring Wipers songs performed by Nirvana, Hole, Napalm Beach, M99, The Dharma Bums, Crackerbash, Poison Idea, and The Whirlees. The CD release of the tribute album was called Fourteen Songs for Greg Sage and the Wipers, and expanded to include covers by Hazel, Calamity Jane, Saliva Tree, Honey, Nation of Ulysses, and Thurston Moore-Keith Nealy.

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Land of the Lost is an album by the Wipers, released by Restless/Enigma in 1986 on LP, CD and cassette. The record remains highly sought after and collectable. This is a great album. It doesn't have the cohesiveness or distinct identity that the previous three Wipers albums had, such as Is This Real?'s punk-inspired new wave, or Youth of America's perfect bridge of punk rock and post-punk or even Over the Edge's raw energy and killer riffs, but it's full of tight punk rock songs thanks to Greg Sage's amazing ability to write melodic, catchy guitar lines as if he were born to do so.
This is yet another truly great album from the Wipers. What this sounds like is some classic American gritty Garage rock, ala The Stooges circa Raw Power. And well...if you know how I feel about Raw Power you should know that I also didn't mind this simplification of sound! Greg Sage is too damn good with his crunchy fuzzy guitar playing and his unique sense of desperate sounding and casually harrowing melodies to NEED anything more than a basic Garage sound to kick ass after all, and that isn't to say this is crappily produced either because you'd be wrong. In fact for a garage album the production is nearly perfect, it's dirty enough, and clean enough.



Wipers - Land Of The Lost  (flac 236mb)

01 Just A Dream Away 3:13
02 Way Of Love 2:08
03 Let Me Know 3:00
04 Fair Weather Friends 3:13
05 Land Of The Lost 4:44
06 Nothing Left To Lose 4:47
07 The Search 4:12
08 Different Ways 4:30
09 Just Say 3:36
 
Wipers - Land Of The Lost  (ogg 77mb)

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The Wipers' 1987 LP found them heading in an even more moody, melancholic direction than before, and indeed, the first four tracks on this album are haunting, atmospheric masterpieces. Dark and gloomy and loaded with Greg Sage's unmistakable guitar tone and trademark soloing style, these songs are perfect for listening to while meditating or going on late-night walks. Beautiful. Unfortunately, after "The Chill Remains", the record takes a turn for the worse, and tracks five through eleven mostly consist of less exciting, more generic rock-oriented tunes. Some of these songs are incredible and absolutely up to the Wipers standard ("Losers Town", "Don't Belong To You" and "Against The Wall" come to mind immediately), but for the most part these songs lack the originality and energy that made the previous Wipers records so damn good. On top of that, the echoey, reverby production that worked so perfectly for those first four tracks isn't at all appropriate for the rest of the record and as a result, most of it just sounds muddy and thin. Don't get me wrong though, this is definitely not a "bad" album. It is a Wipers record, which pretty much automatically guarantees quality, but after four perfect records in a row, I can't help but be slightly disappointed while listening to it. It's definitely worth picking up for the better tracks, but Greg Sage's music wouldn't live up to its full potential again until his second solo album. - See more at: http://www.ssmt-reviews.com/artist/wipers.html#sthash.8Gu0Yro1.dpuf



Wipers - Follow Blind  (flac 195mb)

01 Follow Blind 3:37
02 Someplace Else 2:51
03 Any Time You Find 4:28
04 The Chill Remains 3:30
05 Let It Slide 2:32
06 Against The Wall 3:07
07 No Doubt About It 2:31
08 Don't Belong To You 2:26
09 Losers Town 3:00
10 Coming Down 2:12
11 Next Time 3:14

Wipers - Follow Blind (ogg 66mb)

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At the time of its release, The Circle was meant to be the final Wipers album and Greg Sage had all the intentions of doing some solo work. As it turned out, The Circle represented the last album before a five year hiatus in Wipers releases. For the most part this album is workmanship and steady, but not really offering a whole lot for anyone but the dedicated Wipers fan. The Circle certainly isn't a bad record but at the same time, it does lack a lot of spark of earlier releases as well as later ones. But perhaps that was the reason Greg Sage intended to disband after this record. Everything here has his signature songwriting style and sound but somehow lacks the chemistry and magic of other albums. But on a plus side, the final three songs on the album are slower, much more moody pieces that foreshadow where Sage would go on his 1989 solo release as well as a far reaching hint at the future. Given all that, The Circle is required for anyone who fully digs the Wipers, but would be the last studio album I'd recommend as a first dive into their music.



Wipers - The Circle  (flac 207mb)

01 I Want A Way 2:30
02 Time Marches On 2:46
03 All The Same 3:34
04 True Believer 3:52
05 Good Thing 2:25
06 Make Or Break 3:38
07 The Circle 4:30
08 Goodbye Again 3:16
09 Be There 2:45
10 Blue & Red 3:07

Wipers - The Circle  (ogg 72mb)

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The Wipers have a long-standing reputation as sounding like "Jimi Hendrix fronting a garage band," and while Greg Sage's nimble fretwork might draw comparisons to Hendrix, The Wipers prove on this disc that they're far more proficient than any garage band. The pulsating rhythm section manages to sound vibrant but subdued, allowing Sage's squelching guitar noise to dominate the palette. Unlike other guitar luminaries whose popularity is restrained to a specific audience, Sage's fretboard ramblings made him the favorite guitar hero of the late-'80s underground rock scene. From the deadly riff of "Taking Too Long" to the textured frustration of "Way of Love" to the ringing desire of "Just a Dream Away," Sage proves he is both a versatile and unique talent. Not just among the best of the U.S. post-punk wave, but an enormously influential act that made an indelible mark on styles as disparate as the noise rock of Sonic Youth and Pavement's slacker indie pop.



Wipers - The Best Of Wipers And Greg Sage  (flac 301mb)

01 Nothing Left To Lose 4:47
02 Way Of Love 2:08
03 Some Place Else 2:50
04 The Chill Remains 3:27
05 Soul's Tongue 2:45
06 Blue Cowboy 3:10
07 Taking Too Long 3:05
08 The Circle 4:30
09 Romeo 3:55
10 Messenger 1:54
11 Better Off Dead 2:10
12 No Solution 2:26
13 My Vengeance 2:40
14 Just A Dream Away 3:14
15 Different Ways 4:29
16 Losers Town 2:57

Wipers - The Best Of Wipers And Greg Sage  (ogg 105mb)

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Mar 25, 2014

RhoDeo 1412 Roots

Hello, looks like the plane has been located-finally, so-called smart guys have traced a signal from the middle of nowhere bleeping at a regular interval and what most likely was a straight line towards where the Boeing disappeared. I'm no expert but i doubt there was any air traffic around that plane for hours before it crashed, so how difficult is that to pick up hmm . Surprising reaction by some of the family apparently they thought there was still hope their loved ones were still alive. Personally i find the whole matter a shambles and the authorities clearly incompetent.


Historically, the region of the Congo was a vast geographical area of equatorial Africa located in the tropical wet forest of Central Africa called Congolian forests. It also owes its name to the predominant ethnic group in the region, ruled by Kingdom of Kongo founded towards the end of the 14th century and extended from 1390 to 1914.

Although the span of rule of the kingdom varied, in its greatest extent, the Kingdom of Kongo reached from the Atlantic Ocean in the west to the Kwango River in the east, and from the Congo River in the north to the Kwanza River in the south. The kingdom largely existed from c. 1390 to 1891 as an independent state, and from 1891 to 1914 as a vassal state of the Kingdom of Portugal. The Congo River, its main river, flows through the region forming the Congo Basin.

Some groupings advocate a return to one Congolese homeland on the basis of the historical kingdom. Very notably, the Bundu dia Kongo movement advocates reviving the kingdom through secession from Angola, the Republic of the Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Gabon. The nowadays geographic region spans across the Republic of the Congo (former French Congo), Democratic Republic of the Congo (former Zaïre/Belgian Congo), and the Angolan exclave of Cabinda (former Portuguese Congo) which lies (bizarly !) between the Republic and the Democratic Republic and produces lot's of oil. Ah yes big business making lots of money with Congolese resources.

Ok the coming weeks we're hearing about the music from this African jungle heart, it's a strange place for Westerners, life is cheap and emotions rise quickly. Religion and music deliver the much needed coherance  so for the coming 3 or 4 weeks we will present stars some of which have released many albums most of these never reached the Western public or even the great Discogs database. Today The OK Jazz band that was formed in 1956 in Léopoldville (now Kinshasa), in what was at the time known as the Belgian Congo, later as Zaire and today as the Democratic Republic of the Congo. At one time in the late 1970s and early 1980s the band grew to over fifty members. During that period, it often split into two groups; one group stayed in Kinshasa, playing in nightclubs there, while the other group toured in Africa, Europe and North America. They recorded many dozens of albums some of their material will be here to  .......N'joy

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There's no doubt that Franco was, in every sense of the word, a big man in African music. Sometimes weighing in at 300 pounds, he also earned his nickname as "The Sorcerer of the Guitar," making it sing like no one before, with effortless, fluid lines. Also an accomplished composer and vocalist, Francois Luambo Makiadi remains a towering figure even in death, probably the greatest the Congo (later Zaire) has ever produced, and as the leader of the long-running O.K. Jazz group, he was one of the fathers of the modern Congolese sound.

The musicians who started OK Jazz included Vicky Longomba, Jean Serge Essous, François Luambo Makiadi, De La Lune, Augustin Moniania Roitelet, La Monta LiBerlin, Saturnin Pandi, Nicolas Bosuma Bakili Dessoin and vocalist Philippe Lando Rossignol. They used to play at Loningisa Studios in Kinshasa as individual artists, before they got together to form a band in June 1956. The name OK Jazz originated from the bar in which they played which was named OK Bar. The new band played regularly at a specific studio in the city during the week and on some weekends they played at weddings. In 1957, the lead vocalist, Philippe Lando Rossignol, quit OK Jazz and was replaced by Edo Nganga, from Congo-Brazzaville. Later in the same year, Isaac Musekiwa, a saxophonist from Zimbabwe joined the band. Up to that time the band's leadership was shared between Vicky Longomba, Essous and Franco

In the early 1960s Vicky Longomba and Jean Essous left OK Jazz to join Africa Jazz. Franco then became the leader of the band. He recruited vocalists Kwamy Munsi and Mulamba Joseph Mujos. Simaro Masiya Lutumba joined OK Jazz in 1961, according to an interview he gave in 2002. Essous was replaced by saxophonist Verckys Kiamuangana Mateta. In 1962 OK Jazz visited Nigeria on their first foreign tour. Later that year, Vicky Longomba rejoined the band. Lola Checain, a vocalist who had left earlier also came back.

Around this time, the band changed their name to TPOK Jazz. TP stood for "Tout Pouissant" (all powerful). Band membership had increased to over twenty. The quality of their music had improved to where they could challenge Africa Jazz for the position of Congo's premier group. Franco's music appealed to ordinary people mainly because it discussed issues that affect the common man on a daily basis. Franco led other Congolese musicians in using new technology to produce sounds of much higher quality than in any other part of Africa. The new technology included electric guitars, amplifiers and basses. Congo had now assumed the premier position as Africa's leading music nation.

During the late 1960s, Kwamy Munsi and Mulamba Joseph Mujos led nine other musicians in a mass defection from TPOK Jazz. A few months later, saxophonist Verckys Kiamuangana Mateta also left. Franco recruited Rondot Kassongo wa Kassongo to replace Verckys. He also brought in solo guitarist Mose Fan Fan. Fan Fan had a new style of guitar-playing called sebene, which was more danceable. This style came to be known as Sebene ya ba Yankees. Fan Fan also composed a number of extremely popular hits including Dje Melasi.

During the 1970s Franco and TPOK Jazz consolidated their position as one of the two giants of Congolese popular music, along with Grand Kalle & l'African Jazz. Many musical stars emerged from one or both of these bands. TPOK Jazz was staging concerts all over Africa, including places like Chad and Sudan. The band's finances also improved tremendously. Franco brought on-board composer/vocalist Sam Mangwana. Sam had a Zimbabwean father and an Angolan mother, but was born and raised in Kinshasa, DRC. He spoke English, French and Portuguese, along with a number of African dialects. His recruitment energised the band and infuriated Afrisa, where he came from.

In early 1970 Vicky Longomba, who was then acting as Co-president of the band left. Mose Fan Fan, the band's flamboyant solo guitarist also left. Then Youlou Mabiala quit and formed Orchestre Somo Somo with Fan Fan. Soon after that Tshongo Bavon Marie Marie, Franco's biological brother died in an automobile accident. The band fell upon hard times with low record sales and as sparsely attended concerts. Franco was grief-stricken and despondent and stopped playing music for some time. Upon his return, he recorded several songs in memory of his late brother.

He then began to rebuild the band. This coincided with restructuring of Congo by Mobutu Sese Seko under the program of 'La Aunthenticite'. The name of the country was changed from Congo-Kinshasa to Zaire. Franco adopted the names L'Okanga La Ndju Pene Luambo Luanzo Makiadi. During this time, vocalist Mayaula Mayoni came on board, along with guitarists Mpundi Decca, Gege Mangaya, Michelino Mavatiku Visi and Dizzy Madjeku. Franco then appointed Simaro Lutumba, as the chef d'ochestre. Sam Mangwana composed his hit Luka Mobali Moko around this time.

In 1973 Josky Kiambukuta Londa, a seasoned composer and vocalist joined the band. In 1974, Youlou Mabiala returned to TPOK Jazz. However, Sam Mangwana left and started a solo carer in Cote d'Ivoire. Ndombe Opetum was recruited from Afrisa International to replace Mangwana. He came along with hornsman Empompo Loway. In 1975 Franco released yet another classic hit Bomba Bomba Mabe.

By the mid 1970s Franco was one of Zaire's wealthiest citizens. He was heavily invested in real estate in Belgium, France and in Zaire. He owned Kinshasa's four largest and most popular nightclubs, the biggest of which was Un-deux-trois. TPOK Jazz played there every weekend to a packed house. In 1976, vocalist Zitani Dalienst Ya Ntesa and guitarist Gerry Dialungana were convinced to join TPOK Jazz. Mayaula Mayoni composed a song, Cheri Bondowe which was released in an album that also included Alimatou and Bisalela.

In 1977 Franco introduced a handicapped female singer known as Mpongo Love. Despite her handicap which was the result of childhood polio, she went on to become one of the continents most popular singers on the strength of her charming, vivacious voice and her songwriting. Papa Noel Nedule, an accomplished guitarist joined soon after that. Later that year the band represented Zaire in what was Africa's largest ever cultural event, The Festac which was staged in Lagos, Nigeria.

In 1978 Franco released two songs Helene and Jacky, that were deemed "indecent" by the Attornrey General of his native country. After a brief trial, he was convicted and sent to prison, along wirth other band members, who included Simaro Lutumba. He was released two months later, following street protests. That same year, Mayaula Mayoni released Nabali Misere (I am married to misery). He quit the band soon after, to pursue a solo career. In 1979 Franco moved his recording base from Kinshasa to Brussels, Belgium to take advantage of superior recording facilities. Franco embarked on a tour of eight West African countries. That same year Josky released Propretaire.

This period marked the pinnacle in the success of the band and that of its leader, Franco Luambo Makiadi. The band was releasing an average of four albums a year during this period. The rival Congolese bands, Afrisa International, Orchestre Veve and African Jazz could not keep up with the competition. Life was good. In 1982 Sam Mangwana returned briefly and release an album with Franco called Cooperation. Franco also released several albums with former nemesis Tabu Ley. In 1983 TPOK Jazz toured the United States of America for the first time. That year the song Non was released.

In the mid 1980s the band continued to churn out best sellers including Makambo Ezali Borreaux, 12,600 Letters to Franco, Pesa Position, Mario and Boma Ngai na Boma Yo. By this time Madilu System had taken over as the lead vocalist. In 1986, Josky Kiambukuta and Zitani Dalienst Ya Ntesa, two vocalists who felt they were not getting enough prime time exposure led another mass exodus to form their own band. Around this time, Simaro Lutumba released an album outside the OK Jazz system, featuring the song Maya. During the same timeframe, Malage de Lugendo, a vocalist, was recruited. Also Kiesse Diambu ya Ntessa from Afrisa and female vocalist Joliet Detta came on board.

At the beiginning of 1987, Franco released a 15 minute song Attention Na Sida (Beware of AIDS). The song is sung mainly in French amid heavy African drums and a kaleidoscope of thundering guitars. The song is moving even if one does not understand all the words. Also in 1987, TPOK Jazz were invited to perform at the 4th All-Africa Games in Nairobi, Kenya. In one of the eight albums that the band released in 1987, called Les On Dit, Franco introduced two new female vocalists Nana Akumu and Baniel Bambo. In 1988, Josky and Dalienst re-joined the band.

1989 was a challenging year for the band. Franco's health was in obvious decline. He had by now moved permanently to Brussels. He did not play much and when he did, could only manage about twenty minutes. The band started to fall apart with the defection of Malage de Lugendo and Dizzy and Decca who returned to Kinshasa to pursue other opportunities. Later that year Sam Mangwana teamed with Franco to release the album Forever. The album sleeve carried a photograph of Franco who appeared emanciated, and obviously in ill-health. It turned out to be Franco's last album. On 12 October 1989, Francois Luambo Makiadi died in a hospital in Brussels, Belgium. His body was flown back to Zaire. After four days of mourning, he was given a state funeral on 17 October 1989, by Mobutu Sese Seko's government.

Following the death of Franco, the band members, led by Simaro Lutumba, Josky Kiambukuta, Ndombe Opetum and Madilu System approached the Franco family and agreed to split earnings; (70% musicians and 30% family). This arrangement worked from August 1989 until December 1993. During that period, the band released an album Hommage A Luambo Makiadi, made of songs recorded befeore Franco died. Josky released an album featuring the song Chandra. Simarro released an album that featured the hit record Eau Benite, sung by Madilu, and another album Somo which included the records Marby composed by Josky, and Mort Viviant Somida composed by Madilu System. The band continued to tour both in Africa and in Europe. More defections beset the band but the majority of the mussicians hung in there.

Then in December 1993 it all came crashing down. The Franco family was not satisfied with the profit-sharing arrangement in place at the time. The family wanted more money. They could not reach an agreement with the musicians. The musicians returned the musical equipment to the family and went on to form a new band, Bana OK. Thus ended the life of one of Africa's most famous bands of the 20th Century, that lasted over thirty-seven years; from June 1956 until December 1993.

It is not possible to list here all the records and albums released by TPOK Jazz during the thirty-seven and half years of the band's existence. It is only possible to mention a small fraction of the hundreds of records released by the band over this period.

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If you are curious about the great Franco and TP OK Jazz this a really good place to start. This is majestic music that contains a warm dance music that is also, somehow, plaintive. It has everything: amazing orchestra mix of voices, horns, guitars and the Franco wizard on lead guitar. Arrangements to wonder at. Really can't recommend this enough.



Franco TP OK Jazz - 20th Anniversaire (56-76) (flac  473mb)

01 Liberté 9:34
02 Matata Ya Muasi Na Mobali Ekoki Kosila Te 9:02
03 Melou 6:59
04 Voyage Na Bandundu 8:11
05 Kamikaze 7:53
06 Nzete Esololaka Na Motote 8:10
07 Baninga Tokola Balingaka Ngai Te 7:03
08 Seli-Ja 9:10
09 Salima 9:40
T
Franco TP OK Jazz - 20th Anniversaire (ogg 193mb)

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This music is emotion this music is sex, its life. Its Africa.



Franco et le tout puissant OK Jazz - Vol 1 (flac  330mb)

01 Sandoka 8:18
02 Infidelite Mado 6:22
03 Nalingaka Yo Yo Te 7:57
04 Cherche une Maison 10:09
05 Les on Dit 6:52
06 Belle Mere 12:00
07 Tuti 12:59
08 Tailleur 10:43

Franco et le tout puissant OK Jazz - Vol 1 (ogg 157mb)

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Franco Et L'OK Jazz - 1970-71-72 (flac 314mb)

01 Boma L'Heure 5:04
02 Fungola Ya Mbanda 5:37
03 Cardiaque 5:09
04 Pension Na Bandalungwa 5:17
05 Ba Soucis Ya Week-End 6:02
06 Fifi Nazali Innocent 6:02
07 Mokolo Ya Pasi 5:10
08 Nazali Kitoko Mingi 4:17
09 Bango Nionso Bambanda 7:07
10 Marie Suza 5:30
11 Bolingo Marie Angele 4:04
12 Naboyi Bombanda Ya Basi Misato 5:02
13 Testament 5:37
14 Dje Melasi 6:34

Franco Et L'OK Jazz - 1970-71-72 (ogg 149mb)

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Mar 24, 2014

RhoDeo 1412 'Precious' 11

Hello, Furious protesters clashed with police in Madrid yesterday in a huge anti-austerity demonstration. Tens of thousands of people were seen on the streets of the Spanish capital, in a protest against government cuts, and high unemployment. Six columns of protesters - each from a different region of Spain - arrived at the outskirts of the city early Saturday before heading for Colon square, carrying banners bearing the slogan 'Marching for Dignity.' The protest includes trade unions, civil servants and organizations representing people evicted from their homes for not being able to make mortgage payments after losing their jobs. 'Overall, the poorest 10 percent faced income losses at a rate of 14 percent per year, resulting in a fall of more than one third during 2007-2010. This is by far the largest drop in the OECD,' it added. Oh and with all the unemployment around the time is ideal to erode labor rights. Yes banks still reposses homes whilst sitting on thousands of empty places, after all it's important to make the little people pay for trusting the banks... Oh and hardly a peep in the news about these protests on the other hand the result of El Classico ( Real-Barcelona) is global news, it was a good game deservedly won by Barca.


In 1981, the BBC again tackled "The Lord of the Rings", this time in a serial of twenty six 30-minute episodes.  This production was not a condensed version, although it does leave out a number of events. Still, it is about as faithful to the book as one could reasonably expect. The characterizations are excellent and music is very nicely done. The 26-part series was subsequently edited into 13 hour-long episodes broadcast from 17 July to 9 October 1982, restoring some dialogue originally cut for timing (since each hour-long episode is actually around 57 minutes, as opposed to 54 minutes for two half-hour episodes with overlaps and extra credits removed), rearranging some scenes for dramatic impact and adding linking narration and music cues. .  NJoy

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In 1981 the UK radio station BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo installments. The radio series follows the plot of the original novel (revised 1951 version) very closely, except for the addition of The Tale Bearer, a narrator whose account of the story is often interrupted and embellished by the protagonist Bilbo Baggins in the role of secondary narrator. The 1981 trilogy was adapted for radio by Brian Sibley and Michael Bakewell.  It ws directed by Jane Morgan and Penny Leicester.  It is voiced by some very fine British actors including Ian Holm as Frodo, Michael Hordon as Gandalf and Peter Woodthorpe as Gollum among others.

 The 26-part series was subsequently edited into 13 hour-long episodes broadcast from 17 July to 9 October 1982, restoring some dialogue originally cut for timing (since each hour-long episode is actually around 57 minutes, as opposed to 54 minutes for two half-hour episodes with overlaps and extra credits removed), rearranging some scenes for dramatic impact and adding linking narration and music cues.

 The re-edited version was released on both cassette tape and CD sets which also included the soundtrack album (noticeably taken from a vinyl copy). Incidentally, episode 8 of the series, The Voice of Saruman was labelled as The Voice of Sauron on the cassette & CD box sets.

 Cast and credits

 Narrator: Gerard Murphy
 Frodo Baggins: Ian Holm
 Gandalf the Grey/Gandalf the White: Michael Hordern
 Aragorn (Strider): Robert Stephens
 Sam Gamgee: Bill Nighy
 Meriadoc Brandybuck (Merry): Richard O'Callaghan
 Peregrin Took (Pippin): John McAndrew
 Legolas: David Collings
 Gimli: Douglas Livingstone
 Boromir: Michael Graham Cox
 Galadriel: Marian Diamond
 Celeborn: Simon Cadell
 Arwen Evenstar: Sonia Fraser
 Saruman the White: Peter Howell
 Elrond: Hugh Dickson
 Bilbo Baggins: John Le Mesurier
 Gollum/Sméagol: Peter Woodthorpe

 Dramatisation: Brian Sibley and Michael Bakewell
 Music: Stephen Oliver
 Radiophonic sound: Elizabeth Parker
 Produced and directed by Jane Morgan and Penny Leicester

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Lord Of The Rings 11 - The Battle Of Pelennor Fields (57:13  66mb)

11-01 Opening Titles 10:11
11-02 Grond 4:15
11-03 The Battle of the Pelennor Fie 11:31
11-04 Denethor's Downfall 13:57
11-05 The Hands of the Healer 5:35
11-06 Smoke Then and Think of Him 11:44

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previously

Lord Of The Rings 01 - The Shadow Of The Past (56 min 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 02 - The Black Riders (56 min 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 03 - The Knife In The Dark (57 min 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 04 - The Ring Goes South (55 min 63mb)
Lord Of The Rings 05 - The Mirror Of Galadriel (55 min 64mb)
Lord Of The Rings 06 - The Breaking Of The Fellowship (65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 07 - The Breaking Of The Fellowship (55:25 64mb)
Lord Of The Rings 08 - The Voice Of Saruman (56:42 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 09 - The Two Towers (58:55 67mb)
Lord Of The Rings 10 - The Choices Of Master Samwise (59:07 68mb)

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Mar 23, 2014

Sundaze 1412

Hello, been busy doing nothing much today, have nothing much to add to that.......


With the means to create and distribute music having been 'democratized' this last decade a guy from Moscow made his move to break free from anonymity. 3 years of activity saw the release of more than a dozen hi quality glitch, ambient, modern classical albums by what only can be called an inspired young artist. He deserves much more exposure.  Treat yourselves and .......... N'Joy

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Well I have to make note of the fact that like last weeks artist today's composer is lacking the same ego drive, clearly these eastern European previously communist societies spawn quiet a different mindset, compared to our ego driven west world, and its not so much about making money as it is about creating art. These eastern european artists are virtually anonymous and although they have fine websites, there's not a beep about themselves, no context about how and where they create, who's inspiring them. One could say they are naieve or maybe ignorant, fact it they are not helping themselves if they wanted to breakthrough into the west. The quality of their work is outstanding alas that can't be said of their management/marketing.




Fellirium is the moniker of Andrey Vasilyev - russian musician from Moscow, Russian Federation. Fellirium is an ambient / Experimental music project, focusing on various music in the field of ambient music, ranging from the ambient space Light to Dark Experimental Forms with Neo-Classical Influences.  Andrey supports free music and releases his works under Creative Commons License.

This is all the info i could find on todays artist despite releasing more than a dozen albums, then i came across a chat discussion at relaxmachinery where he answers a number of questions. Posted on November 13, 2010 at 2:23am

I) Why do you create music/art?

 To be honest - I don't know. I just like it, and I even NEED it. When I was a little kid, I liked to draw and imagine lots of strange things and stories. When I grew up, I tried to write something. Short ысш-аш stories, novels, etc. I liked it. I like this feeling I get everytime when I create something, when I made something you can feel, but can not touch... Well, I don't know how to describe it anyway. Now I write music, and I think that it's mine. Music is the way I can express myself, go away from reality, clear my mind, get lots of good feeling and emotions. And - who knows - maybe my music can make some other person feel and see something similar to what I feel and see.

 II) What moods, perspectives, and/or messages are you usually trying to convey when you create music/art?

 Well, actually, I don't try to convey moods or meessages. I'd say I try to convey images, feelings and atmospheres of some certain places out of this reality. My music, as I conceive it, is a little bit escapist.

 III) How do you see your music in comparison to the mainstream genre?

 My music isn't mainstream. Although it is also not the deepest uderground. I will never be popular and I don't need it anyway.

 IV) What is more important to you when you create? a) Getting your own point across or b) Leaving room for interpretation?

 If you take ambient genre for example, it is music for imagination and interpretation, so, my music is certainly leaving room for it. But it also shows my own point through tracks' titles and albums' titles.

 V) Who/what moves or inspires you?

 I take my inspiration from the nature and almost everything around me. Trees, skies, ponds and rivers, houses, distant lights in the night city and so on... Everything created by nature (and by human sometimes) in this world is very beautiful and inspiring, and when I admire it, I hear the music.
 But also some music from my favourite artist is also inspires me, but not as much as nature.

 VI) Would you consider your work to be sincere? If so, why?

 I don't know. But some of mine friends that my work is very sincere, because they reveal my soul, feelings and thoughts (I'm kinda introvert and usually you're don't see all of this). I don't know it is really or not. May the listeners decide.

 VII) What defines as being "good music/art" to you?

 Good music and art for me are music and art that I like or, if I don't like, I respect. It could be very powerful, beautiful and touching, but it couldn't touch my heart or my soul, and because of it I don't like it. But I see it's power, it's beauty, and I acknowledge it.

 VIII) Would you say that musicians/artists become or are good more due to gifts & talents or practice & dedication to hone their craft?

 You can say anything, but I think talent is nothing without practice, so I think both verions together will make artists and musucian good. Of course, there are exceptions when talent or in the other way, practice takes lead. But I think it happens rather seldom

 IX) What do you hope to achieve from what you create?

 Nothing. I just do what I like. That's all. Fame? I don't need it. If I'll be famous then it will be side effect of my activity, not my goal.
 Money? Well, I'm in need of money right now, but I don't want to take money for my music. Music must be free. Even if my music will be on CD some day, I think all money from sales will go to some fund.
 So, I create music because I like to and I don't try to achieve anything.

 X) What effects have you seen your work have on others?

 Well, I don't meet with my listeners, and I don't get much response. I receive e-mail's and comments on the Internet sometimes, where people say that they like my music, but I can't tell what effects exactly my work has on them. But I knew one guy who loved one of my tracks so much, that he listened it over and over again, and again, and again... One day when I visited his last.fm profile page I saw that he listened those track about two thousand times in a row! Oh my god, I've never thought that somebody will love my music so much. But, unfortunatelly, he doesn't liked my other stuff that much. :)

 XI) Where do you think you would be in life if music/art was non-existent? Why?

 Well, I would be in the same spot where I am now, except I wouldn't write music (and listen to it, if it was non-existent). I am not a famous musician whose life consists only of music. Music is some sort of hobby for me (but, to be honest, it is actually something more than just a hobby). And if it was non-existent, well, okay - I would find a new one.

 XII) It has been said many times that musicians are the most creative when they are drug addicts, or as the old saying goes, "No junk, no soul.". In your opinion, do you think that certain drugs aid in the creative process? If so, why?

 Drugs are bad! I've never tried them and I've never will. And I don't like when someone says that ambient music is music for the drug-addicts and it could be listened only when you high. Damn, where does these thoughts comes from?!
 I think ambient music is better than any drug. When I listen to Steve Roach, Robert Rich, Vidna Obmana, Alio Die and other good musicians, it takes me to other world and push me into some sort of trance. It also happen when I create music, thus I don't need any drugs for stimulating creative process. If you need them - bad for you.

 XIII) It used to be every band's dream to get signed onto a record label & now it seems as though bands prefer the freedom of working independently. Why do you think that is?

 Because major labels steal your soul. :)
 Well, when there was no Internet, bands and musicians had no chance to be heard without labels. They could hardly survive by only self-releases and labels was the only way to made a good record, promote yourself and find some fans.
 Now, when everyone can listen what they want and freely get it, labels lose their weight. Why bother searching for label, tuning to its rules and demands, when you can do what you want and like to do, and distribute and promote it by yourself through the Internet?

 XIV) What impact has the record industry had on music throughout the years?

 I don't know what to answer. :)

 XV) Would you consider it to be a fair statement that mainstream music is made more for the sake of acquiring money than for the genuine desire to create, and that underground musicians are the opposite?

 Again, there are lots of exceptions, but I think I agree with it, although there are mainstream artist who make music for deaire to create, and underground musicians who make music only for mone (in last years it's escpecially visible).

 XVI) The internet has, without question, changed how we look at music. It makes it much easier for underground musicians to spread the word about their work. On the other hand, it also makes it possible to download music for free from torrent websites. Overall, do you think that the internet has, and will, hinder or aid underground musicians?

 It depends on what purpose you have. If you want to make money, then it will certainly hinder you. But for musicians like me it is aid, without doubt.




This message recently appeared on his website

I’m glad to announce that my project is still alive. Like a phoenix it rising from the ashes to bring you new music and ambient worlds. New album called ‘Remembrance’ is almost done and will be available for free download in a two or three weeks, so stay tuned.

For me ‘Remembrance’ is very important release. Not only because it’s been almost three years since I released ‘Nightfall’. All these years I haven’t written any music at all, and didn’t listen to any ambient music. I learned to play guitar and tried to create a new music project, tried to play rock, jazz, post-rock music - all because I didn’t feel connection with ambient music and world of sound. But I found out that none of these genres can bring me sweet feeling of harmony and joy of creating, like ambient music did. Lots of good and lots of very bad things happened to me in these three years. For some time I thought I will never be able to make music again, but something inside me always wanted to bring me back in business, and, finally, here I am.

'Remembrance' is the turning point. From the outside it may sound and feel like another ordinary release from Fellirium, but for me it's a control of skills (I didn't record for a long time and I also have a new DAW=Digital audio workstation), quest for new ideas, effort to remember something important and to forget something bad.

P.S.  My English is still bad, but it doesn’t matter as long as you can understand what I’m trying to say. :)

After all, the most important thing is music, not words.

Thank you,

Andrey Vasilyev.

[Moscow, Russia / January 2014]




Discography_
 
Insomnia (07)
Concrete Purgatory ‎(07)
Cellular Structure (07)
Unreleased Tracks (08)
Emerald (08)
Sapphire (08)
The Long Winter  (08)
Monochrome World (08)
Temple Of The Moon (08)
Untitled I (09)
Untitled II (09)
Beyond The Dream (09)
Ruby (09)
Fleurs D'Hiver (09)
Joint Universe (10)
Amethyst ‎(10)
Nightfall ‎(11)
Remembrance ‎(14)

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This album is 1st part of the 'gem series'.
 'Gem series' is series of 5 albums (Sapphire, Emerald, Ruby, Amethyst, Amber), created to be like some sort of training ground for author, where he can search and find new ideas, sounds and techniques.  'Sapphire' is the collection of various experimental tracks. Ambient, dark ambient industrial, neo-classical, noise, downtempo - these are styles you can hear on this album.

Sapphire does not have any specific Theme like Molecular Structures, Environment or winter Abandoned factories. Eryshev time the purpose is more abstract - to express authors soul and feelings at the moment.



Fellirium - Sapphire (flac 197mb)

1 Twilight 6:00
2 Fading 15:15
3 Under The Shadow Of Willow 5:16
4 Shimmer 7:02
5 Collapse 3:25
6 Blue Background 8:00
7 Eternal Loneliness 8:19

Fellirium - Sapphire (ogg 106mb)

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This here are the 2nd and 3rd part of the 'gem series'.
 'Emerald' contains two long-form pieces. Slow ever-changing electronic ambient.  'Ruby' is a soothing meditative ambient work with oriental scent. Deep electronic sound textures with electric string instruments. A journey to the mystical garden of the beautiful red flowers.
A Mystical journey through the depths of imagination. Connect with the abstract organic structure and listen to the breath of it's life. Ruby is dedicated to a fantastic journey to some imaginary garden of red flowers.



Fellirium - Emerald + Ruby (flac  364mb)

1 Spore 33:43
2 Organic Chamber 39:30
Ruby
3 Radiant Circle 10:33
4 Sacred Roots 8:41
5 Red Flowers 7:30
6 Ruby Petals 11:44

Fellirium - Emerald + Ruby (ogg 216mb)

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This album is the 4th part of the 'gem series'.
 'Gem series' is series of 5 albums (Sapphire, Emerald, Ruby, Amethyst, Amber), created to be like some sort of training ground for author, where he can search and find new ideas, sounds and techniques.

Renounce all vain things, mentally relax and open all channels of your perception - this will be the perfect preparation for the ritual of listening to the new album with the magic name Amethyst  it is an atmospheric space ambient work with tribal grooves and rhythms. Deep electronic sound textures with electronic and real drums and percussion. 5 sound canvas woven rolling, undulating atmospheres, from the first seconds are deeply immersed in a space devoid of any unnecessary movements. It all seemed stuck in weightlessness and timelessness, only occasionally moving smoothly from side to side, keeping serene inertia website.  'Amethyst' is a journey through time and space to the unexplored and mystical land of ancient tribes and gods. Smooth electronic atmospheres with some dark influences and tribal rhythmic textures.



Fellirium - Amethyst (flac 190mb)

1 Violet tribe 08:00
2 Spirits gather 11:12
3 Offerings for the stars 08:40
4 Moonlight's daughter 11:28
5 Healer's dream 09:00

Fellirium - Amethyst (ogg 101mb)

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