Jan 30, 2014

RhoDeo 1404 Goldy Rhox 145

Note it looks like Hugefiles is currently down, hopefully they'll sort their issues quickly

Hello, today the 145th post of GoldyRhox, classic rock pop.  Today's focus is on a an English rock band who achieved success with their progressive, art and symphonic style of music. They are distinguished by their use of mystical and cosmic lyrics, live stage sets and lengthy compositions, often with complex instrumental and vocal arrangements. The band's current line-up since February 2012 consists of singer Jon Davison, guitarist Steve Howe, bass guitarist Chris Squire, keyboardist Geoff Downes, and drummer Alan White. However during their initial heyday it was singer Jon Anderson, Squire, Howe,  Bruford and Alan White on drums, and keyboardists Rick Wakeman and Patrick Moraz were part of the band's line-ups, and produced what many critics consider their finest works in the early seventies.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Today's mystery album is the fourth studio album from the English progressive rock band, released 26 November 1971 on Atlantic Records. It is their first album recorded with keyboardist Rick Wakeman after the departure of Tony Kaye earlier in the year. The album is compiled of nine tracks; four are group performances while five are solo features written by each member. It marked the band's first collaboration with artist Roger Dean, who would design their logo and many of their future covers. The album is certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for selling over two million copies.

The album received a mostly positive reception upon its release. Billboard magazine selected the album in its "Billboard Pick" feature, describing it as "vibrant, soothing, tumultuous, placid and instrumentally brilliant" and Anderson's vocals "deliciously ingratiating".[34] In his review for Rolling Stone, Richard Cromelin pointed out the album's "gorgeous melodies, intelligent, carefully crafted, constantly surprising arrangements, concise and energetic performances" and "cryptic but evocative lyrics". It's decreed to be one of the 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Today's mystery album was the band's breakthrough album, propelling them in a matter of weeks from a cult act to an international phenomenon; not coincidentally, it also marked the point where all of the elements of the music (and more) that would define their success for more than a decade fell into place fully formed. The science-fiction and fantasy elements that had driven the more successful songs on their preceding record, were pushed much harder here, and not just in the music but in the packaging of the album: the Roger Dean-designed cover was itself a fascinating creation that seemed to relate to the music and drew the purchaser's attention in a manner that few records since the heyday of the psychedelic era could match. 2003 saw Rhino and Elektra put out a new remastered CD conducted by Dan Hersch, with "America" and an early rough mix of "Roundabout" as bonus tracks, you could get it here


Goldy Rhox 145  (flac 395mb)


Goldy Rhox 145   (ogg 151mb)

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previously

Goldy Rhox 116  (flac 388mb)

Goldy Rhox 116   (ogg 96mb)

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Jan 29, 2014

RhoDeo 1404 Aetix

Hello, last night i zapped thru 3 hours of Grammy award ceremony, even without the commercials it was a bizar waste of time , a 17 year old girl from Middle Earth was awarded with song of the year as she praised her Royals and her performance as a thirthy something swedish vixen got her the Best Pop Solo Performance (should be imitation). Yes infantile is the word the springs to mind when describing 2014's Grammy award ceremony. The Daft Punk guys must have been laughing themselves half dead all the way to the bank this year. To confirm their gullability the US music industry felt obliged to declare Get Lucky and the album Random Acces Noise (oops Memories) as the best 2013 had to offer...really. Such a bunch of nincompoops why anyone takes these guys seriously is beyond me.

I know money, shitloads of trickle down dollars forever created out of thin air by the FED and tonight the big boss get's to wave his magic wand and create an extra trillion or more- who cares, nobody on this planet dares to tell the US its dollar is worth less then toilet paper-which it is. But then say no to it and the Satan will destroy you. It's an evil game and now the UK has given itself over to the same game, print endless amounts of make-belief pounds to pay for its debts. However, there is a limit to how far this thieving is accepted and all the spying in the world will not be enough to intimidate the righteous and the day of reckoning will come or will it ? The price the world will have to pay for creating this monstrous monetairy system will be zero if only we would awaken. Alas this planet has been ruled by fear, it has been used ever since the monotheistic religions reared its ugly head, and those in power have used the tool of fear at every corner to drive forth it's army of human locusts. I really wonder if this planet can sustain another millenium of humans. I doubt it, but then there are such that strive to be immortal inside a virtual world ah yes that fear of death-the ultimate weapon of old. It's power has been waning which is a good thing too many have let themselves be intimidated by selfserving priests.


Meanwhile still stuck in Minneapolis a beautiful midwestern town built between lakes and woods by those who felt right at home there, Germans and Scandinavians still make up almost halve of its 400,000 citizens. The Minneapolis park system has been called the best-designed, best-financed, and best-maintained in America. The city's Chain of Lakes, consisting of seven lakes and Minnehaha Creek, is connected by bike, running, and walking paths and used for swimming, fishing, picnics, boating, and ice skating. A parkway for cars, a bikeway for riders, and a walkway for pedestrians runs parallel along the 52 miles (84 km) route of the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway. Public transport is well supported and it's one of the cleanest cities on the planet.

It has a very culture minded populace , the region is second only to New York City in live theater per capita and is the third-largest theater market in the U.S. after New York City and Chicago. Many performing arts groups and art museums/galleries. The man usually known as Prince the towns most famous musical progeny lights up it's music scene. It really is a very cultured city.... hence Republicans play second fiddle despite the presence of many affluent white citizens. Philanthropy and charitable giving are part of the community. More than 40% of adults in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul area give time to volunteer work, the highest such percentage of any large metropolitan area in the United States.

Today's artists unlike many of their underground contemporaries, played "heart-on-the-sleeve" rock songs that combined Westerberg's "raw-throated adolescent howl," with self-deprecating lyrics. They were a notoriously wayward live act, part of the mystique of todays artists was the fact that the audience never knew until the start of a concert if the band would be sober enough to play and it was not uncommon for the group to play entire sets of cover versions . . ....N'Joy

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The Replacements' history began in Minneapolis in 1978 when nineteen-year-old Bob Stinson gave his eleven-year-old brother Tommy Stinson a bass guitar to keep him off the streets. That year Bob met Mars, a high school dropout. With Mars playing guitar and then switching to drums, the trio called themselves "Dogbreath" and began covering songs by Aerosmith, Ted Nugent and Yes without a singer.
After being impressed by the band's performance, Westerberg regularly listened in after work. Dogbreath auditioned several vocalists, Westerberg joined the band, Dogbreath often drank and took various drugs during rehearsals, playing songs as an afterthought. In contrast to the rest of the band, the relatively disciplined Westerberg appeared at rehearsals in neat clothes and insisted on practicing songs until he was happy with them. After the band members discovered first-generation English punk bands like The Clash, The Jam, The Damned and The Buzzcocks, Dogbreath changed its name to The Impediments and played a drunken performance without Tommy Stinson at a church hall gig in June 1980. After being banned from the venue for disorderly behaviour, they changed the name to the Replacements.

In their early days, they sounded quite similar to Hüsker Dü, the leaders of the Minneapolis punk scene. However, The Replacements were wilder and looser than the Hüskers and quickly became notorious for their drunken, chaotic gigs. After they built up a sizable local following the Minneapolis Jesperson signed them, he was the manager of Oar Folkjokeopus, a punk rock record store in Minneapolis, and had also founded Twin/Tone Records with a local recording engineer named Paul Stark. With the agreement of Stark and the rest of the band, the Replacements signed to Twin/Tone Records in 1980. Jesperson's support of the band was welcomed, and they asked him to be their manager after their second show.

When the band's first album, Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash, finally appeared in August 1981, it received positive reviews in local fanzines. Option's Blake Gumprecht wrote, "Westerberg has the ability to make you feel like you're right in the car with him, alongside him at the door, drinking from the same bottle." The album contained the band's first single, "I'm in Trouble", Westerberg's "first truly good song".[18] Sorry Ma included the song, "Somethin to Dü", a homage to another Minneapolis punk band Hüsker Dü. The Replacements had a friendly rivalry with the band, which started when Twin/Tone chose the Replacements over Hüsker Dü, interestingly the Replacements began playing faster and became more influenced by Dü's hardcore punk. Despite this, the band did not feel part of the hardcore scene.

Sometime in late 1981, the Replacements played a song called "Kids Don't Follow". Jesperson was convinced the song sounded like a hit and pleaded with the Twin/Tone co-owners Stark and Hallman, "I will do anything to get this out. I will hand-stamp jackets if I have to." The partners agreed to fund the recording, but Jesperson and virtually everyone he knew had to hand-stamp ten thousand white record jackets The band recorded eight tracks within a week, with Jesperson as producer. Their "balls-to-the-wall hardcore punk attempt", their first EP Stink, containing "Kids Don't Follow" and seven other songs, was released in June 1982, six months after the Chicago show.

The Replacements began to distance themselves from the hardcore punk scene after the release of Stink. "We write songs rather than riffs with statements," Westerberg later stated. Inspired by other rock subgenres, he had been writing songs that incorporated a wide range of musical styles. He even wrote an acoustic ballad, "You're Getting Married One Night", but when he played it to the rest of the band, it was met with silence. "Save that for your solo album, Paul," Bob Stinson said. "That ain't the Replacements". The track remained unreleased for years. Westerberg realized his toughest audience was the band itself, later saying, "If it doesn't rock enough, Bob will scoff at it, and if it isn't catchy enough, Chris won't like it, and if it isn't modern enough, Tommy won't like it."

With a batch of new songs, the Replacements entered a warehouse in Roseville, Minnesota, to record their next album, with the Twin/Tone co-owner Stark engineering. Westerberg wrote songs in stops and starts, so it took several sessions of recording to finish the album. Hootenanny, the band's second studio album, was released in April 1983. Hootenanny saw Westerberg expand his songwriting capabilities, In songs such as "Willpower", with echoed vocals and a sparse arrangement, and "Within Your Reach", which features Westerberg on all instruments, he revealed a more sensitive side. It was a much more mature album than Stink and Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash. Hootenanny was played on over two hundred radio stations across the country, with critics acclaiming the album.

By Hootenanny's release, The Replacements had begun to attract a following outside of Minneapolis. The band embarked on its first tour of the U.S. in April 1983, Tommy Stinson dropped out of tenth grade to join the rest of the band on tour. The Replacements toured venues in the East Coast of the United States. The band supported R.E.M. on an eight-date tour later that summer, deciding that they should alienate the audience as much as possible. It was not a successful tour; by the end, various members had threatened to leave The Replacements. Band morale was low, and Westerberg later stated, "We'd much rather play for fifty people who know us than a thousand who don't care.

For the recording of their next studio album, The Replacements decided to return to Blackberry Way Studios in late 1983. The band considered R.E.M.'s guitarist Peter Buck as producer, but when they met him in Athens, Georgia, they did not have enough material to begin recording. Instead, Jesperson and Steve Fjelstad co-produced the album. The new material placed more of a focus on songwriting and the music was influenced by heavy metal, arena rock and Chicago blues. Instruments such as piano, twelve-string guitar and mandolin featured throughout the album. The new album included songs such as "I Will Dare", which featured Buck playing lead guitar, "Androgynous", with Westerberg on piano, and "Unsatisfied", where, according to writer Michael Azerrad, Westerberg "had hit upon a moving new way to declare that he can't get no satisfaction." Let It Be was released in October 1984 to critical acclaim.

It's release attracted attention from the major record labels, and by late 1984 several had expressed an interest in signing the band. Financially, the band was not doing well; they were not selling enough records to recoup their expenses, and money from shows went to recording costs, hotels, travel and instrument repairs. Twin/Tone was not being paid reliably by distributors and the sales of Let It Be were not high enough to justify extra promotion. "It was time for a major label to take over," according to the label's co-owner Stark. The band was close to a major label contract, but often alienated label representatives by intentionally performing badly in concert; their 1985 live album, The Shit Hits the Fans, was an example of their concert performances at the time.

One label, the Warner Bros. Records subsidiary Sire Records, eventually signed The Replacements. The band admired the label head Seymour Stein, who had managed the Ramones. The Replacements' first major-label album, Tim, was scheduled to be produced by Westerberg's idol, Alex Chilton, but the sessions fell through; the album was produced by former Ramone Tommy Erdelyi. Upon its release in 1985, Tim garnered rave reviews that equalled those for Let It Be. Though the band was poised for a popular breakthrough, they were unsure about making the leap into the mainstream.  As a result, they never let themselves live up to their full potential. The Replacements landed a spot on Saturday Night Live, but they were roaring drunk throughout their performances and Westerberg said "f*ck" on the air. Their concerts had became notorious for such drunken, sloppy behavior. Frequently, the band was barely able to stand up, let alone play, and when they did play, they often didn't finish their songs. The Replacements also refused to make accessible videos -- the video for "Bastards of Young" featured nothing but a stereo system, playing the song -- thereby cutting themselves off from the mass exposure MTV could have granted them.

After the tour for Tim, the Replacements fired Bob Stinson, partly for being unwilling to play the band's "less rocked-out" material, and partly for being too drunk to try. They also fired Jesperson the same year. "It was like being thrown out of a club that you helped start," Jesperson later commented. The Replacements recorded their next album as a trio in Memphis, TN, with former Big Star producer Jim Dickinson. The resulting album, Pleased to Meet Me, was more streamlined than their previous recordings. Again, the reviews were uniformly excellent upon its spring 1987 release, but the band didn't earn many new fans. During the tour for Pleased to Meet Me, guitarist Slim Dunlap filled the vacant lead guitarist spot and he became a full-time member after the tour.

Two years later, the band returned in the spring of 1989 with Don't Tell a Soul, The Replacements' last bid for a mainstream audience. The bandmembers had cleaned up, admitting that their years of drug and alcohol abuse were behind them, and were now willing to play the promotional game. Don't Tell a Soul boasted a polished, radio-ready production and the group shot MTV-friendly videos, beginning with the single "I'll Be You." Initially, the approach worked -- "I'll Be You" became a number one album rock track, crossing over to number 51 on the pop charts. However, Don't Tell a Soul never really took off and failed to establish the band as a major commercial force.

Defeated from the lackluster performance of Don't Tell a Soul, Paul Westerberg planned on recording a solo album, but Sire rejected the idea. Consequently, the next Replacements album, All Shook Down, was a solo Westerberg record in all but name. Recorded with a cast of session musicians as well as the band, All Shook Down was a stripped-down, largely acoustic affair that hinted at the turmoil within the band. Chris Mars left shortly after its fall 1990 release, claiming that Westerberg had assumed control of the band; he would launch a solo career two years later. The Replacements toured in support of All Shook Down, with Steve Foley, formerly of the Minneapolis-based Things Fall Down, as their new drummer. Neither the tour nor the album were successful, and The Replacements quietly disbanded in the summer of 1991.

Tommy Stinson quickly followed his time in The Replacements with the short-lived but fan favorite bands Bash & Pop and Perfect. He has been the bass guitarist for Guns N' Roses since 1998, replacing the original member Duff McKagan. In 2004, he released a solo CD, Village Gorilla Head, followed in 2011 by One Man Mutiny. Dunlap released a solo album in 1993. Bob Stinson died February 15, 1995, from a drug overdose. Westerberg began a solo career slowly, releasing two songs on the Singles ("Dyslexic Heart," "Waiting for Somebody") soundtrack in 1992; he also scored the film. He released his debut solo album, 14 Songs, in the summer of 1993 to mixed reviews. Paul Westerberg's second solo album, Eventually, was released in the spring of 1996.

On April 22, 2008, Rhino released re-mastered deluxe editions of the band's four Twin/Tone albums with rare bonus tracks. On September 24, 2008, Rhino similarly released the four Sire albums as deluxe editions. On October 3, 2012, it was announced that The Replacements had reformed and that Westerberg and Tommy Stinson were in the studio recording an EP containing song cover versions. Titled Songs for Slim, the EP was sold in a 250-copy edition of 10" vinyl and auctioned online to benefit former bandmate Dunlap, who had suffered a stroke. The Replacements played their first shows in 22 years at Riot Fest in Toronto (24–25 August 2013), Chicago (13–15 September) and Denver (21–22 September). Dave Minehan, guitarist/vocalist, and drummer Josh Freese rounded out the line-up for these shows.

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Let It Be looms large among '80s rock albums, generally regarded as one of the greatest records of the decade. So large is its legend and so universal its acclaim that all the praise tends to give the impression that the Replacements' fourth album was designed as a major statement, intended to be something important when its genius, like so many things involving the 'Mats, feels accidental. Compared to other underground landmarks from 1984, Let It Be feels small scale, as it lacks the grand, sprawling ambition of the Minutemen's Double Nickels on the Dime or the dramatic intensity of Hüsker Dü's Zen Arcade, or if the other side of the Atlantic is taken into equation, the clean sense of purpose of The Smiths. Nothing about Let It Be is clean; it's all a ragged mess, careening wildly from dirty jokes to wounded ballads, from utter throwaways to songs haunting in their power. Unlike other classics, Let It Be needs those throwaways -- that Kiss cover, those songs about Tommy getting his tonsils out and Gary's boner, that rant about phony rock & roll -- to lighten the mood and give the album its breathless pacing, but also because without these asides, the album wouldn't be true to the Replacements, who never separated high and low culture, who celebrated pure junk and reluctantly bared their soul. This blend of bluster and vulnerability is why the Replacements were perhaps the most beloved band of their era, as they captured all the chaos and confusion of coming of age in the midst of Reaganomics, and Let It Be is nothing if not a coming-of-age album, perched precisely between adolescence and adulthood. There's just enough angst and tastelessness to have the album speak to teenagers of all generations and just enough complicated emotion to make this music resonate with listeners long past those awkward years, whether they grew up with this album or not.

 All this works because there is an utter lack of affect in Paul Westerberg's songs and unrestrained glee in the Replacements' roar. Sure, Let It Be has moments where the thunder rolls away and Westerberg is alone, playing "Androgynous" on a piano and howling about having to say good night to an answering machine, but they flow naturally from the band's furious rock & roll, particularly because the raw, unsettled "Unsatisfied" acts as a bridge between these two extremes. But if Let It Be was all angst, it wouldn't have captured so many hearts in the '80s, becoming a virtual soundtrack to the decade for so many listeners, or continue to snag in new fans years later. Unlike so many teenage post-punk records, this doesn't dwell on the pain; it ramps up the jokes and, better still, offers a sense of endless possibilities, especially on the opening pair of "I Will Dare" and "Favorite Thing," two songs where it feels as if the world opened up because of these songs. And that sense of thrilling adventure isn't just due to Westerberg; it's due to the 'Mats as a band, who have never sounded as ferocious and determined as they do here. Just a year earlier, they were playing almost everything for laughs on Hootenanny and just a year later a major-label contract helped pull all their sloppiness into focus on Tim, but here Chris Mars and Tommy Stinson's rhythms are breathlessly exciting and Bob Stinson's guitar wails as if nothing could ever go wrong. Of course, plenty went wrong for the Replacements not too much further down the road, but here they were fully alive as a band, living gloriously in the moment, a fleeting moment when anything and everything seems possible, and that moment still bursts to life whenever Let It Be is played.



The Replacements - Let It Be  (flac 368mb)

01 I Will Dare 3:11
02 Favorite Things 2:17
03 We're Comin' Out 2:20
04 Tommy Gets His Tonsils Out 1:51
05 Androgynous 3:14
06 Black Diamond 2:36
07 Unsatisfied 3:59
08 Seen Your Video 3:05
09 Gary's Got A Boner 2:25
10 Sixteen Blue 4:21
11 Answering Machine 3:37
Bonus Material
12 20th Century Boy 3:57
13 Perfectly Lethal 3:31
14 Tempatation Eyes 2:30
15 Answering Machine 2:43
16 Heartbeat - It's A Lovebeat 2:56
17 Sixteen Blue 5:09

The Replacements - Let It Be  (ogg 131mb)

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Twin/Tone rush-released the cassette-only live album The Shit Hits the Fans before the Replacements left the label for Sire later in 1985. The album is an audience tape of an Oklahoma City concert from 1984 that a Replacements roadie confiscated from a patron that was bootlegging the show and it is presented unvarnished. Consequently, it is, as they like to say, a "warts-and-all" document of a standard Replacements show, capturing the group as they slaughter several of their best-known songs and run-through drunken covers of R.E.M., Thin Lizzy and the Rolling Stones. The tape sounds poor and the performances are, to be charitable, sloppy, but it's great fun for hardcore fans, especially those longing for the 'Mats alcohol-fueled live shows.



The Replacements - Shit Hits the Fans  ( flac 312mb)

01 Lawdy Miss Claudy 1:35
02 Sleeping Night Of Jesus 2:21
03 Lovelines 2:54
04 I'll Be There 3:01
05 Sixteen Blue 4:46
06 Can't Hardly Wait 3:26
07 I Will Dare 3:44
08 Hear You Been To College 3:18
09 Saturday Night Special 2:01
10 Iron Man 1:35
11 Misty Mt. Hop 1:03
12 Heartbreaker 0:22
13 Can't Get Enough Of Your Love 2:30
14 Jailbreak 1:18
15 Breakdown 1:42
16 No More The Moon Shines On Loreena 2:00
17 Mirror Go Round 1:05
18 Left Here In The Dark 3:00
19 Takin Care Of Business 2:50
20 I Will Follow 0:35
21 Jumpin Jack Flash 1:08
22 Radio Free Europe 1:54
23 More Fun In The New World 2:12
24 Let It Be 1:18

The Replacements - Shit Hits the Fans  (ogg 117mb)

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Moving to a major label was inevitable for the Replacements: they garnered too much acclaim and attention after Let It Be to stay on Twin/Tone, especially as the label faced the same distribution problems that plagued many indies in the mid-'80s -- plus, the 'Mats' crosstown rivals, Hüsker Dü, made the leap to the big leagues, paving the way for their own hop over to Sire. the Replacements may have left Twin/Tone behind but they weren't quite ready to leave Minneapolis in the dust, choosing to record in their hometown with Tommy Erdelyi -- aka Tommy Ramone -- who gives the 'Mats a big, roomy sound without quite giving them gloss; compared to Let It Be, Tim is polished, but compared to many American underground rock records of the mid-'80s (including those by the Ramones), it's loose and kinetic. The production -- guitars that gained muscle, drums and vocals that gained reverb -- is the biggest surface difference, but there aren't just changes in how the Replacements sound; what they're playing is different too, as Paul Westerberg begins to turn into a self-aware songwriter. A large part of the charm of Let It Be was how it split almost evenly between ragged vulgarity and open-hearted rockers, with Westerberg's best songs betraying a startling, beguiling lack of affect. That's not quite the case with Tim, as Westerberg consciously writes alienation anthems: the rallying cry of "Bastards of Young" and the college radio love letter "Left of the Dial," songs written with a larger audience in mind -- not a popular audience, but a collection of misfits across the nation, who huddled around Westerberg's raw, twitchy loneliness on "Swingin Party" and "Here Comes a Regular," or the urgent and directionless "Hold My Life."

 These songs are Westerberg at his confessional peak, but instead of undercutting this ragged emotion or hiding it away, as he did on the Twin/Tone albums, he pairs it with the exuberance of "Kiss Me on the Bus" -- an adolescent cousin to "I Will Dare" -- and channels his smart-ass comments into the terrifically cynical rockabilly shuffle "Waitress in the Sky." All this eats up so much oxygen that there's not much air left for any of the recklessness of the Twin/Tone LPs: there's no stumbling, no throwaway jokes, with even the twin rave-ups of "Dose of Thunder" and "Lay It Down Clown" straightened out, no matter how much Bob Stinson might try to pull them apart, which is perhaps the greatest indication that the Replacements were no longer the band they were just a couple years ago. Some 'Mats fans never got over this change, but something was gained in this loss: the Replacements turned into a deeper band on Tim, one that spoke, sometimes mumbled, to the hearts of losers and outcasts who lived their lives on the fringe. If Let It Be captured the spirit of the Replacements, then Tim captured their soul.



The Replacements - Tim  (flac 246mb)

01 Hold My Life 4:18
02 I'll Buy 3:20
03 Kiss Me On The Bus 2:48
04 Dose Of Thunder 2:16
05 Waitress In The Sky 2:02
06 Swingin Party 3:48
07 Bastards Of Young 3:35
08 Lay It Down Clown 2:22
09 Left Of The Dial 3:41
10 Little Mascara 3:33
11 Here Comes A Regular 4:46

The Replacements - Tim  (ogg 85mb)

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Jan 28, 2014

RhoDeo 1404 Roots

Hello,

Madagascar, officially the Republic of Madagascar, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Southeast Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar (the fourth-largest island in the world), as well as numerous smaller peripheral islands. Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar split from India around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90 percent of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth. The island's diverse ecosystems and unique wildlife are threatened by the encroachment of the rapidly growing human population.

Initial human settlement of Madagascar occurred between 350 BCE and 550 CE by Austronesian peoples arriving on outrigger canoes from Borneo. These were joined around 1000 CE by Bantu migrants crossing the Mozambique Channel. Other groups continued to settle on Madagascar over time, each one making lasting contributions to Malagasy cultural life. The Malagasy ethnic group is often divided into eighteen or more sub-groups of which the largest are the Merina of the central highlands. At 592,800 square kilometres (228,900 sq mi), Madagascar is the world's 47th largest country and the fourth-largest island.

As a result of the island's long isolation from neighboring continents, Madagascar is home to an abundance of plants and animals found nowhere else on Earth. Approximately 90 percent of all plant and animal species found in Madagascar are endemic, including the lemurs (a type of prosimian primate), the carnivorous fossa and many birds. This distinctive ecology has led some ecologists to refer to Madagascar as the "eighth continent", and the island has been classified by Conservation International as a biodiversity hotspot.

More than 80 percent of Madagascar's 14,883 plant species are found nowhere else in the world, including five plant families. Three-fourths of Madagascar's 860 orchid species are found here alone, as are six of the world's eight baobab species. The island is home to around 170 palm species, three times as many as on all of mainland Africa; 165 of them are endemic. Many native plant species are used as herbal remedies for a variety of afflictions. The drugs vinblastine and vincristine, used to treat Hodgkin's disease, leukemia and other cancers, were derived from the Madagascar periwinkle. The traveler's palm, known locally as ravinala and endemic to the eastern rain forests, is highly iconic of Madagascar and is featured in the national emblem as well as the Air Madagascar logo

Like its flora, Madagascar's fauna is diverse and exhibits a high rate of endemism. Lemurs have been characterized as "Madagascar's flagship mammal species" by Conservation International. In the absence of monkeys and other competitors, these primates have adapted to a wide range of habitats and diversified into numerous species. As of 2012, there were officially 103 species and subspecies of lemur. They are almost all classified as rare, vulnerable, or endangered. At least 17 species of lemur have become extinct since man arrived on Madagascar, all of which were larger than the surviving lemur species. The island is home to two-thirds of the world's chameleon species, including the smallest known, and researchers have proposed that Madagascar may be the origin of all chameleons.

Madagascar's varied fauna and flora are endangered by human activity. Since the arrival of humans around 2,350 years ago, Madagascar has lost more than 90 percent of its original forest. This forest loss is largely fueled by tavy ("fat"), a traditional slash-and-burn agricultural practice imported to Madagascar by the earliest settlers. Malagasy farmers embrace and perpetuate the practice not only for its practical benefits as an agricultural technique, but for its cultural associations with prosperity, health and venerated ancestral custom (fomba malagasy). As human population density rose on the island, deforestation accelerated beginning around 1400 years ago. By the 16th century, the central highlands had been largely cleared of their original forests. According to a conservative estimate, about 40 percent of the island's original forest cover was lost from the 1950s to 2000, with a thinning of remaining forest areas by 80 percent. In addition to traditional agricultural practice, wildlife conservation is challenged by the illicit harvesting of protected forests, as well as the state-sanctioned harvesting of precious woods within national parks. It is anticipated that all the island's rainforests, excluding those in protected areas and the steepest eastern mountain slopes, will have been deforested by 2025. Ah yes the human locust.. they make music too ....N'joy

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Madagascar, the world’s fourth largest island, has incredible ethnic diversity and rich history. The Rough Guide To The Music Of Madagascar features music across the broad Malagasy spectrum – from the island’s spicy dance music to the purest music from the highlands. Featuring the valiha (a tubular bamboo zither) and lokanga (three-stringed fiddle), among other instruments specific to the island, this album explores the diverse Malagasy culture that has been influenced by Arab, Persian, Chinese, Indian and European societies over the years.

The music of Madagascar is both exotic and comforting, an interesting amalgam of Eastern and African. The songs are catchy and toe-tapping good fun.
As with most, if not all, of the Rough Guide collections, this one is expertly curated and compiled. The liner notes are a great introduction to the history of Madagascar and the Malagasy people, as well as the development of the Malagasy musical traditions. Madagascar is best known for its unique guitar style: guitar afficionados will consider this collection essential. So should anyone looking for something beyond the same old same old. This will appeal to fans of African, worldbeat, jazz (especially Brazilian jazz styles), and East Asian music. Picking a favorite track on this record is like picking your favorite fork-full when eating a really delicious dessert. Every bite tastes good!



The Rough Guide To The Music Of Madagascar   (flac  414mb)

01 Jaojoby - Tsy Zanaka Mpanarivo 4:43
02 Ny Antsaly - Fokafoka 2:10
03 Vakoka - Era 3:47
04 Hazolahy - Ka Mipoerapoera 4:11
05 Toto Mwandjani - Ankitiny 4:42
06 Monja - Gasy Mahay 4:34
07 Tarika - Aloka 4:46
08 Vilon'Androy - Tolombolagne 4:03
09 Mahaleo - Tadidiko Ry Zalahy 5:00
10 D'Gary - Zaza Somondrara 4:15
11 Koezy - Andresy Moramora 4:13
12 Rajery - Mahafinaritra 3:39
13 Teta - Mbola Tiako Anao 3:45
14 Daniel Tombo - Taraka 4:25
15 Ny Sakelidalana - Solofaka 3:23
16 Régis Gizavo - Eka Lahy 3:26

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Gifted with a deep, gutsy voice and a talent for writing songs that reflect on the daily life and struggles of the people of his homeland, Oliver "Tuku" Mtukudzi is one of Zimbabwe's greatest artists. Wiki lists 55 albums released by him since 1978 alas hardly any of them available in the West. His blending of Southern African music traditions, including mbira, mbaqanga, jit, and the traditional drumming styles of the Korekore, has created such a unique sound that it has been respectfully dubbed "Tuku music." While Parade referred to Mtukudzi as "one of the few genuine innovators on the Zimbabwean music scene," Prize Beat proclaimed that "his music has been instrumental in strengthening our freedom, socially, politically, and economically." Bonnie Raitt, who has recorded several of his songs, explained, "The juxtaposition of what Mtukudzi sings about and his raw, imploring, vocal reminds me of Otis Redding, Toots Hibbert, and some of my favorite reggae, an odd pairing of agonizing, thorny lyrics over basically lighthearted music." Mtukudzi released his debut single, "Stop After Orange," in 1975. Two years later, he began performing with the Wagon Wheels, a group who featured Thomas Mapfumo. His tenure with the band was short-lived, however. By 1979, he had left to pursue a solo career. Taking several of the band's musicians with him, he formed a new group, the Black Spirits. Their debut single, "Dzandimomotera," sold enough copies to qualify for gold record status.
As a solo artist, Mtukudzi had his first successes shortly after Zimbabwe declared its independence in 1980. His debut solo album, Africa, included two hits: "Zimbabwe" and "Mazongonyedze." Mtukudzi has consistently balanced his musical career with his passion for film and drama. In addition to appearing in several documentaries on Zimbabwean music, including the BBC-produced Under African Skies and The Soul of the Mbira, he starred in Jit, the first film featuring an all-Zimbabwean cast. He also played a prominent role in, as well as composed and arranged the soundtrack for, Zimbabwe's second film, Neria. His work earned him a M'Net award for Best Soundtrack of 1992. Mtukudzi subsequently wrote and directed the musical production Was My Child (Plight of Street Children). With the accompaniment of the Black Spirits or the 12-piece supergroup Mahube, Mtukuduzi continued to tour and record. In February 1994, they spent six weeks performing in Austria and Switzerland. That December, they shared a double bill with Lucky Dube for a concert in South Africa. In 1997, Mtukudzi performed in Holland, Germany, Zimbabwe, and South Africa with Mahube, who are comprised of South African musicians. An album, Mahube, was released in October 1998. Mtukudzi reached his commercial peak with the album Tuku Music, which spent 11 weeks at the top of the CMJ New World Music charts. The album has been released in Zimbabwe on the Zimbabwe Music Corporation label, in South Africa on the Sheer Sound label, in Europe on the Label Bleu label, in the United Kingdom on the Connoisseur Collection label, and in North America on the Putumayo World Music label. Shortly after the album's release, Mutukudzi toured the United States and Canada, along with Taj Mahal and Toumani Diabate and Baaba Maal, as part of Africa Fête 1999. A video of Mtukudzi's September 1999 performance in San Francisco was released in February 2000. The album Paivepo reached the top position on Zimbabwe's music charts the first week after its release in November 1999.

The songs on Tuku Music are both exotic and simple ("Tuku" is Mtukudzi's nickname). There's nothing especially unusual about Mtukudzi's instrumentation. For those familiar with Zimbabwean mbira music (mbira is the Shona thumb piano), Tuku's sound shows the influence of this bright, mesmerizing music, particularly in the guitar lines, but this is hardly the only inspiration at work in his music. "Katekwe," the traditional drumming patterns of Tuku's clan, the korekore, can often be heard at the bottom of his music, calling forth the traditional rhythmic soul of Shona music. The south African styles of jit and mbaqaqa have also exerted an influence which is evident in a few songs, but not especially evident in others. Tuku music is really a unique vibe, keyed by the robust yet remarkably gentle vocals of Tuku and the dazzling voices of Mwendi Chibindi and Mary Bell. Mtukudzi's most distinctive American release to date. "Tod!!" and "Mabasa," the songs addressing the AIDS pandemic in Zimbabwe, are especially moving and melodically powerful. The liner notes are well done, providing brief comments on the lyrical content of each song.



Oliver Mtukudzi -- Tuku Music (flac  374mb)

01 Dzoka Uyamwe 6:01
02 Tsika Dzedu 6:27
03 Mai Varamba 6:24
04 Ndima Ndapedza 6:26
05 Tapindwa Nei 6:33
06 Todii 6:50
07 Mabasa 7:15
08 Rirongere 5:54
09 Wake Up 6:09

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Mokoomba are a sextuplet hailing from one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, Victoria Falls. The group (Mathias Muzaza -lead vocals, Abundance Mutori -bass, Trustworth Samende -lead guitar, Miti Mugande -percussion, Donald Moyo -keyboards and Ndaba Coster Moyo -drums).announced their arrival on the world stage in a rather modest way, first teaming up after church sessions to sing in their local languages. If they were not teaming up after Sunday service, they were beating the drums and strumming the guitars after school, since they grew up in the same neighbourhood in Victoria Falls. Little wonder they are turning out to be another wonder themselves. Victoria Falls is a border town interconnecting five countries — Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Angola — which implies a potpourri of cultures and languages, it is not surprising then that the group is at home singing in any of the languages that you find along the Zambezi basin. So as you listen to the 12 songs on Rising Tide, you will be listening to as many as seven languages, languages as diverse as Nsenga, Mbunda, Luvale, Chokwe, Nyanja, Lingala, and Tonga. Singing in a variety of languages, Mokoomba has been flying the country’s flag high in the world with an Afro-fusion beat that has had the world dancing on the tip of its toes for several months now.

Intrinsically, Mokoomba, which the six-some coolly passes off as a concept, rather than a band, has stridden across to vast expanses of global reach with what many might assume was with little effort and sweat. But the crossing of the river, as the word Mokoomba loosely means, was not without its trials and tribulations. In 2008, Mokoomba won the Music Crossroads Inter-regional festival in Malawi competing with other young bands from Malawi, Zambia, Tanzania and Mozambique which became the launch-pad to their career development. The grand prize was a European tour, an opportunity to record their first six-track album Kweseka (Drifting Ahead) as well as intensive training in music and stage presentation.

Since then, Mokoomba has been growing rapidly, performing at concerts, festivals and cultural exchange workshops. To date, the band has flown the Zimbabwean flag high, taking their music to Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Belgium, Holland, Italy, Luxemburg, Sweden, Spain, Czech Republic, Norway, South Africa, Germany, Serbia, Hungary, Macedonia, Austria, Russia and Finland.
Mokoomba just returned from an impressive performance at the Moshito Music Conference Showcase in Johannesburg, South Africa, that featured bands from Congo/Belgium (Fredy Massamba), Reunion Islands (Iza and Natalie Natiembé), Senegal (Bouba Kirikou), Spain (Trance Untes), Uganda (Maurice Kirya) and South Africa (HHP and The Brother Moves on).

Mathias Muzaza, the lead vocalist

“We are a concept. We signify the Zambezi River as a vibrant source of life for the Tonga people and our culture, as our provider of food, water and recreation. We were formed in 2008 when we got together to prepare for the Music Crossroads Zimbabwe competitions. We all boys grew up in the same neighbourhood, knowing each other since school days and playing together in church and also for the late great Victoria Falls musician Alfred Mujimba.”
Mokoomba’s music is called afro-fusion, they fuse traditional Tonga stories and rhythms with funk, reggae, Latin touches and pop influence, blended in with a distinctive Mokoomba groove and lyrical content. “Muzaza’s unique vocal talent is another key element. It is unmistakable, it comes from the depth of our spiritual tradition and touches deeply the soul of audiences all over the world. As you know, the town of Victoria Falls is located on the border with Botswana, Namibia and Zambia also very close to Angola. “All the people in this region are raised to understand and speak all of the regional languages and cultures so Mokoomba also brings all these traditions and beauty of the languages and the cultures into their music.”



Mokoomba - Rising Tide  (flac 333mb)

01 Njoka 3:43
02 Masangango 5:42
03 Mangongo 3:27
04 Mwile 3:37
05 Misozi 5:13
06 Yombe 3:06
07 Nimukonda 4:28
08 Ndundule 4:53
09 Manunge 4:47
10 Mabemba 2:18
11 Mvula 4:30
12 Welelye 3:27

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Jan 27, 2014

RhoDeo 1404 LOTR 03

Hello, today's insight " when a capitalist economy is young, the human virtues do indeed govern earning power. But that correlation does not endure because inherited wealth, in later generations, skews the distribution of rewards in favor of those who inherit much, thereby breaking the link between wealth owned and wealth earned. Eventually, the possession of wealth overshadows every innate human virtue: at last, even intelligence. The measure of man moves from his genes to his bank accounts, or from his blood to his wallet, and while this is going on the quality of man as a biological organism dwindles. "


In 1981, the BBC again tackled "The Lord of the Rings", this time in a serial of twenty six 30-minute episodes.  This production was not
a condensed version, although it does leave out a number of events. Still, it is about as faithful to the book as one could reasonably
expect. The characterizations are excellent and music is very nicely done.  NJoy

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In 1981 the UK radio station BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo installments. The serial was originally broadcast from 8 March to 30 August 1981 on BBC Radio 4 on Sundays from 12 Noon to 12:30pm.
The radio series follows the plot of the original novel (revised 1951 version) very closely, except for the addition of The Tale Bearer, a narrator whose account of the story is often interrupted and embellished by the protagonist Bilbo Baggins in the role of secondary narrator. The 1981 trilogy was adapted for radio by Brian Sibley and Michael Bakewell.  It was directed by Jane Morgan and Penny Leicester.  It is
voiced by some very fine British actors including Ian Holm as Frodo, Michael Hordon as Gandalf and Peter Woodthorpe as Gollum among others.

The 26-part series was subsequently edited into 13 hour-long episodes broadcast from 17 July to 9 October 1982, restoring some dialogue originally cut for timing (since each hour-long episode is actually around 57 minutes, as opposed to 54 minutes for two half-hour episodes with overlaps and extra credits removed), rearranging some scenes for dramatic impact and adding linking narration and music cues.

The re-edited version was released on both cassette tape and CD sets which also included the soundtrack album (noticeably taken from a vinyl copy). Incidentally, episode 8 of the series, The Voice of Saruman was labelled as The Voice of Sauron on the cassette & CD box sets.

Cast and credits

Narrator: Gerard Murphy
Frodo Baggins: Ian Holm
Gandalf the Grey/Gandalf the White: Michael Hordern
Aragorn (Strider): Robert Stephens
Sam Gamgee: Bill Nighy
Meriadoc Brandybuck (Merry): Richard O'Callaghan
Peregrin Took (Pippin): John McAndrew
Legolas: David Collings
Gimli: Douglas Livingstone
Boromir: Michael Graham Cox
Galadriel: Marian Diamond
Celeborn: Simon Cadell
Arwen Evenstar: Sonia Fraser
Saruman the White: Peter Howell
Elrond: Hugh Dickson
Bilbo Baggins: John Le Mesurier
Gollum/Sméagol: Peter Woodthorpe

Dramatisation: Brian Sibley and Michael Bakewell
Music: Stephen Oliver
Radiophonic sound: Elizabeth Parker
Produced and directed by Jane Morgan and Penny Leicester

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Lord Of The Rings 03 - The Knife In The Dark (57 min 65mb)

3-01 At Weathertop 11:03
3-02 Sam's Song 5:35
3-03 Aragorn Tells the Story of the 2:04
3-04 The Lord of the Nazgul 20:01
3-05 The Precious 7:38
3-06 Boromir's Dream 10:38

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previously,
Lord Of The Rings 01 - The Shadow Of The Past (56 min 65mb)
Lord Of The Rings 02 - The Black Riders (56 min 64mb)

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Jan 26, 2014

Sundaze 1404

Hello,

These albums really set the mood for individuals wanting to take that chill-time with that special someone.be it downtime with your companion, or even a simple get together with family and friends. N'Joy

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Elektrolux is one of the global top address for ambient music founded by last weeks artists: Alex Azary, Gabriel Le Mar and Pascal FEOS. It has released 194 titles thusfar and has two sublabels Liquid Lounge and Mikrolux focusing on the more club-oriented, electrofied, but also experimental efforts. The company is home in Frankfort Germany, meanwhile they renamed themselves as Elux as some global brands have taken it's internet space, think swedish household appliance company of that name.

Essential to the passion, philosophy and driving purpose of Elektrolux is the unity of sound and vision while demanding and requiring high-quality and innovative music productions. Elektrolux masters Chill Out and its sub-genres, e.g. Ambient, Experimental Electronic, Downbeat, Listening, Lounge, Elektro, Dub and House by creatively mixing the different genres. As of 2000 a dazzling musical library was created with the tracks released on more than one hundred CDs, compilations, maxi singles, ten DVD’s and with licensing all over the globe. Hundreds of national and international producers distinguish Elektrolux a fervent developer of the European music and media scene. Produced together with the British design expert Neville Brody the creative collaborations of artwork set new standards in CD design while being recognized as groundbreaking in design catalogues all over the world.

Five years after it's foundation, Elektroluxbuild up a strong reputation beyond the borders of Germany. The output of the Frankfurt based label ranges from Ambient and Electro to Dub, often incorporating other contemporary musical styles like House, Downbeat/Broken Beats or Drum'n'Bass. Many Elektrolux releases work in the Club while at the same time serving the need for musical experiments. The philosophy of the label, the unity of sound and vision, manifests itself not only in innovative high quality music, but also in the pretentious cover artwork.

The list of artists releasing on Elektrolux is long and incorporates projects from Germany as well as from the UK, the USA, the Netherlands and even Iceland. Acts like Full Moon Fashions (London) or the chill out specialists Aural Float (Frankfurt) have received international acclaim, the US-german experimental outfit Insect Jazz and multi media performers Supreme Particles have also released first class productions on Elektrolux. Germanys leading Electro artist, Anthony Rother, delivered a considerable club hit with his 12" "Redlight District", Dub Mix Convention produced one of the best german Dub longplayers so far. Other milestones of electronic music came from Frankfurt based projects Fresh Moods, Subtonal and Syrinx 2600 as well as Babel from Iceland, Apollo 440s DJ Harry K. and the Netherland's Quantum Leap.

 Since 1996, Elektrolux is cooperating with the south german TV station Bayerischer Rundfunk (BR), creating the well known audio visual "Space Night" project. Label mastermind Alex Azary is not only responsible for compiling the various artists series under the same title, he also takes part in the creation of the visual concept. The latest CD-, vinyl- and video-collaboration, "Space Night Vol. V - Earthviews VI", is well received by lovers of electronic music as well as TV night programme watchers. The soundtrack is released by Eastwest and Elektrolux, the tv special is shown every night on BR.

By the end of 1997 Elektrolux started the compilation series Ambient Diary, Elektro Codes and Dub Backups with not only artists from the Elektrolux stable but also associated projects. The success of the Volumes One was even topped by Volumes Two, which were released in late 1998. The whole series (so far six releases with 10 CDs) has become a standard in the collections of electronic music lovers.

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VA - The Future Is My Melody Vol 1 (flac  433mb)

01 Rescape - Silur X Zeit 4:24
02 Naoki Kenji - Under The Surface 4:51
03 Fous De La Mer - Never Stop Loving 5:17
04 Stereofreund - Roy 6:03
05 PFL - For The Love Of You 6:27
06 Zoomin' - One For Me 5:50
07 Sushi Club - Tsuki (Soul G And Tony Match Remix) 3:18
08 Guardner - The Future Is My Melody 6:34
09 Naoki Kenji - My Destiny Remix 5:47
10 Sniper Mode - Fragile Beauty 5:04
11 Jean F. Cochois - Days, Weeks And Years 6:49
12 Fous De La Mer - Cosmic Lullaby 4:34
13 Ruxpin - I Miss You 3:56
 
VA - The Future Is My Melody Vol 1  (ogg 166mb)

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VA - The Future Is My Melody Vol 2  (flac 458mb)

01 Naoki Kenji - Ecoustic Chapter 3 4:41
02 Groovecatcher - After The Rain 5:09
03 Fous De La Mer feat. Özlem - As I Look Around 5:15
04 Jean F. Cochois - Stories Of "Highfeelin' Times" 5:12
05 Aural Float - Him & Her (Chris Wood Re-Edit) 5:57
06 Sushi Club - Sakura 4:56
07 Fresh Moods - Parasol 6:21
08 Fous De La Mer feat. Sol - Conmigo 5:01
09 Naoki Kenji - Let It Flow 5:13
10 Jean F. Cochois - Electronique Love 4:54
11 Fous De La Mer - Waiting For The Sun 6:02
12 PFL with Julia Messenger - Bird On A Wire 4:28
13 Copshow - Cold Heart Lies 4:20
14 Jean F. Cochois - Love Remains 3:58
 
VA - The Future Is My Melody Vol 2  (ogg 162mb)

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By the first two "The Future Is My Melody" compilations, the german based Elektrolux label, home of well-known and benchmarking compilation series like Space Night or Flowmotion, already proved that Ambient and Pop may be complementary in a most sensual way. Finally, the fascination of the human voice is essential in electronic music as well. Therefore, the third volume of "Future Is My Melody" illustrates the modernity and internationality of a pop understanding which could not be further apart from casting shows and one-hit-wonder-phenomena. The likewise Mediterranean und erotic track “Luces” by Ibiza-based Marko Bussian, Jean-Charles Vandermynsbrugge and Argentina-born Sol Ruiz de Galarreta aka Fous de la Mer is an optimum starter track for the compilation. Moreover, it features two Fous de la Mer productions and three tracks by Ambient masterminds Aural Float (with a Fresh Moods remix of "How deep" which has not been released yet). Together with the intensive sound fantasies of the Anglo-Dutch producer team Groovecatcher and some more well-known Chillout projects such as Genuine aka Chris Zippel (also co-author of the current Robbie Williams/Pet Shop boys single), Fresh Moods or Index ID, "The Future Is My Melody Vol. 3" creates a common language of timeless recreation and feeling good with the sound of a different kind of pop music. This language reaches far beyond differences regarding origin and rhythmic texture of Ambient, Lounge, Jazz and relaxed Drum and Bass. This approach is impressively completed by two tracks of the Icelandic band Worm is Green and Espresso del Lago (the Swiss Flavio Maspoli and André Baumgartner) which are an outlook on their respective albums to be released on Mikrolux soon. The potential of Ambient pop is not exhausted yet - and why shouldn´t future have its very own melody?



VA - The Future Is My Melody Vol 3  (flac 462mb)

01 Fous De La Mer - Luces 5:03
02 Groovecatcher - Angel Of Nature 6:07
03 Fresh Moods - So Far 4:55
04 Aural Float - How Deep (Reworked By Fresh Moods) 5:40
05 Worm Is Green - Electron John 3:18
06 Chris Zippel - As Possible 4:46
07 Aural Float - Still Here 6:33
08 Espresso Del Lago - Suratat 5:23
09 Groovecatcher - Walking By 5:14
10 Fous De La Mer - All These Years 4:01
11 Fresh Moods - U Gone 7:16
12 Aural Float - Be As You Are 3:35
13 Index ID - Gone 4:16
14 Fous De La Mer - Ocean 22` E 5:47

VA - The Future Is My Melody Vol 3  (ogg 164mb)

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Jan 25, 2014

RhoDeo 1403 Beats

Hello,

These months the French rule the beats and they have plenty to offer even though not that much reaches the world as  the music scene is rather dominated by the Anglo - American industry. Meanwhile the French enjoyed themselves in their own niche so to speak, and they did rather well. Today's artists, have sold over 500,000 albums worldwide. Their elegant sound is now firmly engrained in the public’s subconscious through hit singles, sold-out tours and clever sound-tracking on many high-profile advertising campaigns. Yet we should never forget that, above all, they are a band who have only ever simply strived for creative perfection, ah yes. ....... N'joy

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The electronic outfit Télépopmusik followed in the footsteps of Air, Les Rythmes Digitales, and Dimitri From Paris and established their own musical stylings in the arena of French dance music. The core trio of Fabrice Dumont, Stephan Haeri, and Christophe Hetier formed in 1997 after burning out from playing with other bands. Dumont founded the dream pop group Autour de Lucie, whereas Hetier used to be the popular DJ Anti-Pop and Haetri played with Planet Zen. As Télépopmusik, the group contributed their newly fresh electronic sound on "Sonic 75" to a SourceLab compilation in the same year. Telepopmusik's first single was released on the independent record label Catalogue under the rather ironic title of "An Ordinary Life".  Their acid house electronic jive was far more impressive on Genetic World, which appeared on Capitol in April 2002, their debut album received critical and public acclaim following nominations at the French Victories de la Musique Awards and the US Grammy Awards, selling more than 350.000 copies – it became one of the first French albums to boast sales in all world markets. Simple dreamy songs with clever production that never cramped the catchy hooks. Debut single "Breathe" was popular among the club circuit for several months, but by early 2003 the song became a mainstream smash thanks to its inclusion in television ads for the Mitsubishi Outlander SUV. In February, the group embarked on their first ever American tour. During the marathon-like tour that followed they played over 100 concerts - from Moscow, Istanbul and the Glastonbury Festival to New York and Puerto Rico.

Their second opus ‘Angel Milk ’, a delightful journey in melancholy that in spite of itself became a reference point in the crossover between European electronic music and the new US hip hop scene, went on to enjoy the same critical and commercial success worldwide. Their last release, ‘Ghost Girl ’ in 2009 only confirmed the fact that, without resting on their laurels, Telepopmusik had kept their unique position in forward-thinking music in the 21st century.

The band took some time out in 2010/11 to explore other projects. Antipop has taken his successful ‘Cinemixa’ concept and DJ sets around the world while 2Square recorded a soloproject. Dumont, the third original member decided to stop making music in order to take
time out to create the Gum label (Woodkid / The Shoes etc). Getting back to work with fresh ideas and ears, Antipop and 2Square have taken the time necessary to work the magic once again. The new opus features the vocal talents of Betty Black ( bettyblack.net ) & Johanna Wedin as well as firm favourites such as Angela McCluskey. One or two surprises will be aboard too.

The band will be putting out their upcoming releases internationally in collaboration with Splendid, a Paris based 2.0 label that has been designed to suit the band’s international audience in today ’s constantly changing market and opportunities. The band will be back on the road for a live tour from mid-June onwards. 2 Square & Antipop were locked away in the studio for most of 2012 putting together the finishing touches to what will be their third album, slated for 2014. On 24th June 2013 they released Try Me Anyway / Fever EP which featured New York based vocalist Betty Black (Sylvia Gordon) and remixes from Dirty Channels, Zombie Disco Squad, Populette, Pit Spector and Pino Rastovitch.

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This debut outing by French techno craftsmen Fabrice Dumont, Stephan Haeri, and Christophe Hetier is a lounge lizard's idea of heaven. Among the many intriguing elements stitched between the subtle dance beats are sultry female spoken-word snippets and seductive melodies provided by Peaches and Chilly Gonzales and gravel-voiced Scottish chanteuse Angela McCluskey of Wild Colonials. The overall vibe is predominantly mellow and the arrangements ooze sophistication via jazz chord voicings, an occasional upright bass sample, and odd time signatures. Cuts such as "Dance Me" will please the hardcore disco set and "Da Hoopla," featuring guest vocalist Soda Pop of Dirty Beatniks, emerges an obvious nod to the hip-hop nation. "Let's Go Again" melds acid jazz and acid rock with a repetitive bass motif, distorted guitar riffing, and groovy sound blasts, culminating with muted trumpet licks (is that you, Miles Davis?) on the coda. Genetic World contains a little something for every music fan, which, in this case, is a good thing.



Télépopmusik - Genetic World ( flac 297mb)

01 Breathe 4:56
02 Genetic World 3:59
03 Love Can Damage Your Health 5:34
04 Smile 4:38
05 Dance Me 3:15
06 Da Hoola (Soda-Pop Remix) 3:01
07 Let's Go Again 3:53
08 Trishika 5:56
09 Yesterday Was A Lie 5:00
10 L'Incertitude d'Heisenberg 8:46
11 Breathe (Extended Mix) 5:55

Télépopmusik - Genetic World  (ogg 127mb)

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Télépopmusik's sophomore effort is filled with beautiful backing tracks. Pillows of soft synth slowly emerge while pianos, harps, brass instruments, electronic ticks, and glitches stroll in and out of the picture as they please. This subdued electronica landscape is something to get lost in, and while it's nothing you haven't heard before, it's exactly what headphones crave on rainy days and almost enough to excuse the hackneyed lyrics and overindulgence. Almost. "Last Train to Wherever"'s "did you get the letter?/the one I never sent ya" is just one of the cringe-worthy couplets Angel Milk is stuffed with. Mau, a vocalist who apes the styles of Tricky and Massive Attack's 3D -- as opposed to Deborah Anderson, who apes Björk, and Angela McCluskey, who apes Billie Holiday -- delivers the couplet so heavy-handedly it's impossible to ignore no matter how hard you try. Hanging all this derivative quirk and cleverness on the thin melodies is bad enough, but the album really stumbles when a couple ambitious tricks grind things to a halt. When Anderson asks the synthesized orchestra to stop and "pick it up a little" it's effective if you're one of the few who hasn't heard Björk's version of "It's Oh So Quiet." Then there's the 15 minutes of silence with a little surprise somewhere in there at the end of the album, the final "aren't we cunning" straw. Télépopmusik know their way around a studio and can deliver a velvety soundscape that other trip-hoppers would die for, but trite lyrics and so many precious attempts at impressing make Angel Milk ponderous.



Télépopmusik - Angel Milk  (flac 286mb)

01 Don't Look Back 3:50
02 Stop Running Away 2:41
03 Anyway 2:34
04 Into Everything 4:25
05 Love's Almighty 4:28
06 Last Train To Wherever 5:02
07 Brighton Beach 4:23
08 Close 3:18
09 Swamp 2:05
10 Nothing's Burning 3:52
11 Ambushed 1:34
12 Hollywood On My Toothpaste 5:28
13 Tuesday 1:26
14 Another Day 5:35
15 15 Minutes 0:15
16 Baboons 2:39

Télépopmusik - Angel Milk   (ogg 121mb)

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Red Red (Rouge Rouge) is a French group of electronic music born from the meeting of the composer Nicolas Errèra , co-founder of Grand Popo Football Club and composer of film music ( Tie club , Le Papillon ) and Jean Fang , DJ and presenter alongside 's Ariel Wizman on Radio Nova . They released their first album in 2002 titled Tonight, after dinner , scrapbook style lounge , in the spirit of St Germain , Télépopmusik and Gotan Project . L'Amour , the first single from this album, is featured on the compilation Hotel Costes 5. Other samples from the album can be found on compilations such as Nova Tunes Vol. 8 , 9 Hotel Costes , Paris Lounge ...

The debut album from Rouge Rouge "ce Soir, Après Dîner" is a hybrid mixture of fresh down tempo, electro, and dub sounds and vocals from Lunar singles of the 60's and the 70's. The duo of Jean Croc and Nicolas Errera produced 11 surprising and satisfying tracks full of emotion, humour and love such as "l'amour", featured on the "hôtel Costes 5" Collection. While you may not know the title of "Decide Toi", you'll definitely recognize it from a 2002 Mercedes ad campaign as well as on the "Paris Lounge 2" and "Champs Elysees 2" collections. And there is plenty more to explore and marvel at on this disc, especially "Cache Cache" which is simply intoxicating. The "French Sound" has been taken to a new level past Daft Punk and the like with new dimensions and vocals added in the mix for a fantastic aural experience!



Rouge Rouge - Ce Soir, Après Dîner (flac 274mb)

01 Rouge Rouge Intro 0:35
02 L'Amour 4:32
03 Décide Toi 4:28
04 La Vie Japonaise 5:25
05 Tricoter 3:20
06 L'Amour Avec Toi 4:15
07 Attention 3:51
08 Pop Art 3:25
09 Gentil Gentil 3:30
10 Cache Cache 4:51
11 La Malle (Epilogue) 3:14

Rouge Rouge - Ce Soir, Après Dîner  (ogg 103mb)

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Jan 23, 2014

RhoDeo 1403 Goldy Rhox 144

Hello, today the 144th post of GoldyRhox, classic pop rock,  In the darklight a UK band first popular in Europe, the band quickly became successful in North America during the British Invasion of the mid 1960s. Having released 22 studio albums in the UK(24 in the US), nine live albums (ten in the US), and numerous compilations, their worldwide sales are estimated at more than 200 million albums. In 1971 they began a string of eight consecutive studio albums reaching number one in the United States. Their most recent album of entirely new material, was released in 2005. In 1989, the band were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 2004, they ranked number 4 in Rolling Stone magazine's 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. In 2008, Billboard magazine ranked the them at number ten on "The Billboard Hot 100 Top All-Time Artists", and as the second most successful group in the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Today's mystery album is is a double album by today's artists was released on 12 May 1972. The album's music incorporates rock and roll, blues, soul, country, and gospel genres. By the spring of 1971 the band owed more in taxes than they could pay and left Britain before the government could seize their assets. Mick Jagger settled in Paris with his new bride Bianca, and guitarist Keith Richards rented a villa, Nellcôte, in Villefranche-sur-Mer, near Nice. The other members settled in the south of France. As a suitable recording studio could not be found where they could continue work on the album, Richards' basement at Nellcôte became a makeshift studio using the band's mobile recording truck.

Today's mystery album is the eighth British and tenth American album of todays artists released in December 1969 by Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US. Released shortly after the band's 1969 American Tour, it is the last album by the band to feature Brian Jones as well as the first to feature Mick Taylor. Although the Stones had begun the recording of "You Can't Always Get What You Want" in November 1968, before Beggars Banquet had been released, recording for today's mystery album began in earnest in February 1969 and would continue sporadically until early November" Brian Jones performs on only two tracks: playing the autoharp on "You Got the Silver", and percussion on "Midnight Rambler". His replacement, Mick Taylor, plays guitar on two tracks, "Country Honk" and "Live With Me". Keith Richards, sang his first solo lead vocal here with "You Got the Silver".

Released in December, it reached #1 in the UK (temporarily knocking The Beatles' Abbey Road out of the top slot) and #3 on the Billboard Top Pop Albums chart in the US, where it eventually went 2x platinum. The album was the Stones' last to be released in an official mono version, which is rare and highly sought-after today. In 2003, it was listed at #32 on the "List of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time". In his 2001 Stones biography, Stephen Davis said of the album "No rock record, before or since, has ever so completely captured the sense of palpable dread that hung over its era." Indeed, the day after its 5 December release is the date of the infamous Altamont Free Concert, but the album was critically well received. Today's mystery album is the second of the band's run of four studio LPs that are generally regarded as among their greatest achievements artistically, equaled only by the best of their great 45's from that decade.

The cover displays a surreal sculpture designed by Robert Brownjohn. The image consists of the record being played by the tone-arm of an antique phonograph, and a record-changer spindle supporting several items stacked on a plate in place of a stack of records: a tape canister, a clock dial, a pizza, a tyre and a cake with elaborate icing topped by figurines representing the band. The cake parts of the construction were prepared by then-unknown cookery writer Delia Smith. The reverse of the LP sleeve shows the same "record-stack" melange in a state of disarray. The artwork was inspired by the working title of the album, which was Automatic Changer. The album cover  was among the ten chosen by the Royal Mail for a set of "Classic Album Cover" postage stamps issued in January 2010.


Goldy Rhox 144  (flac 281mb)

Goldy Rhox 144   (ogg 101mb)

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This band has amassed dozens of gold/platinum discs these past 5 decades that's why there's been a number of Goldy Rhox posts these past 3 years all re-upped 23 weeks ago some will still be live..

week 1109 re-up
Goldy Rhox 16  (ogg 106mb)

week 1146 re-up
Goldy Rhox 46   (flac 212mb)

Goldy Rhox 46   (ogg 89mb)

week 1220 re-up
Goldy Rhox 72   (flac 284mb)

Goldy Rhox 72 Bonus  (flac 269mb)

Goldy Rhox 72   ( ogg 186mb)

week 1332
Goldy Rhox 121  (flac 418mb)

Goldy Rhox 121   (ogg 151mb)


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Jan 22, 2014

RhoDeo 1403 Aetix

Hello, still stuck in Minneapolis a beautiful midwestern town built between lakes and woods by those who felt right at home there, Germans and Scandinavians still make up almost halve of its 400,000 citizens. The Minneapolis park system has been called the best-designed, best-financed, and best-maintained in America. The city's Chain of Lakes, consisting of seven lakes and Minnehaha Creek, is connected by bike, running, and walking paths and used for swimming, fishing, picnics, boating, and ice skating. A parkway for cars, a bikeway for riders, and a walkway for pedestrians runs parallel along the 52 miles (84 km) route of the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway. Public transport is well supported and it's one of the cleanest cities on the planet.

It has a very culture minded populace , the region is second only to New York City in live theater per capita and is the third-largest theater market in the U.S. after New York City and Chicago. Many performing arts groups and art museums/galleries. The man usually known as Prince the towns most famous musical progeny lights up it's music scene. It really is a very cultured city.... hence Republicans play second fiddle despite the presence of many affluent white citizens. Philanthropy and charitable giving are part of the community. More than 40% of adults in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul area give time to volunteer work, the highest such percentage of any large metropolitan area in the United States.

Today's artists unlike many of their underground contemporaries, played "heart-on-the-sleeve" rock songs that combined Westerberg's "raw-throated adolescent howl," with self-deprecating lyrics. They were a notoriously wayward live act, part of the mystique of todays artists was the fact that the audience never knew until the start of a concert if the band would be sober enough to play and it was not uncommon for the group to play entire sets of cover versions . . ....N'Joy

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The Replacements' history began in Minneapolis in 1978 when nineteen-year-old Bob Stinson gave his eleven-year-old brother Tommy Stinson a bass guitar to keep him off the streets. That year Bob met Mars, a high school dropout. With Mars playing guitar and then switching to drums, the trio called themselves "Dogbreath" and began covering songs by Aerosmith, Ted Nugent and Yes without a singer.
After being impressed by the band's performance, Westerberg regularly listened in after work. Dogbreath auditioned several vocalists, Westerberg joined the band, Dogbreath often drank and took various drugs during rehearsals, playing songs as an afterthought. In contrast to the rest of the band, the relatively disciplined Westerberg appeared at rehearsals in neat clothes and insisted on practicing songs until he was happy with them. After the band members discovered first-generation English punk bands like The Clash, The Jam, The Damned and The Buzzcocks, Dogbreath changed its name to The Impediments and played a drunken performance without Tommy Stinson at a church hall gig in June 1980. After being banned from the venue for disorderly behaviour, they changed the name to the Replacements.

In their early days, they sounded quite similar to Hüsker Dü, the leaders of the Minneapolis punk scene. However, The Replacements were wilder and looser than the Hüskers and quickly became notorious for their drunken, chaotic gigs. After they built up a sizable local following the Minneapolis Jesperson signed them, he was the manager of Oar Folkjokeopus, a punk rock record store in Minneapolis, and had also founded Twin/Tone Records with a local recording engineer named Paul Stark. With the agreement of Stark and the rest of the band, the Replacements signed to Twin/Tone Records in 1980. Jesperson's support of the band was welcomed, and they asked him to be their manager after their second show.

When the band's first album, Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash, finally appeared in August 1981, it received positive reviews in local fanzines. Option's Blake Gumprecht wrote, "Westerberg has the ability to make you feel like you're right in the car with him, alongside him at the door, drinking from the same bottle." The album contained the band's first single, "I'm in Trouble", Westerberg's "first truly good song".[18] Sorry Ma included the song, "Somethin to Dü", a homage to another Minneapolis punk band Hüsker Dü. The Replacements had a friendly rivalry with the band, which started when Twin/Tone chose the Replacements over Hüsker Dü, interestingly the Replacements began playing faster and became more influenced by Dü's hardcore punk. Despite this, the band did not feel part of the hardcore scene.

Sometime in late 1981, the Replacements played a song called "Kids Don't Follow". Jesperson was convinced the song sounded like a hit and pleaded with the Twin/Tone co-owners Stark and Hallman, "I will do anything to get this out. I will hand-stamp jackets if I have to." The partners agreed to fund the recording, but Jesperson and virtually everyone he knew had to hand-stamp ten thousand white record jackets The band recorded eight tracks within a week, with Jesperson as producer. Their "balls-to-the-wall hardcore punk attempt", their first EP Stink, containing "Kids Don't Follow" and seven other songs, was released in June 1982, six months after the Chicago show.

The Replacements began to distance themselves from the hardcore punk scene after the release of Stink. "We write songs rather than riffs with statements," Westerberg later stated. Inspired by other rock subgenres, he had been writing songs that incorporated a wide range of musical styles. He even wrote an acoustic ballad, "You're Getting Married One Night", but when he played it to the rest of the band, it was met with silence. "Save that for your solo album, Paul," Bob Stinson said. "That ain't the Replacements". The track remained unreleased for years. Westerberg realized his toughest audience was the band itself, later saying, "If it doesn't rock enough, Bob will scoff at it, and if it isn't catchy enough, Chris won't like it, and if it isn't modern enough, Tommy won't like it."

With a batch of new songs, the Replacements entered a warehouse in Roseville, Minnesota, to record their next album, with the Twin/Tone co-owner Stark engineering. Westerberg wrote songs in stops and starts, so it took several sessions of recording to finish the album. Hootenanny, the band's second studio album, was released in April 1983. Hootenanny saw Westerberg expand his songwriting capabilities, In songs such as "Willpower", with echoed vocals and a sparse arrangement, and "Within Your Reach", which features Westerberg on all instruments, he revealed a more sensitive side. It was a much more mature album than Stink and Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash. Hootenanny was played on over two hundred radio stations across the country, with critics acclaiming the album.

By Hootenanny's release, The Replacements had begun to attract a following outside of Minneapolis. The band embarked on its first tour of the U.S. in April 1983, Tommy Stinson dropped out of tenth grade to join the rest of the band on tour. The Replacements toured venues in the East Coast of the United States. The band supported R.E.M. on an eight-date tour later that summer, deciding that they should alienate the audience as much as possible. It was not a successful tour; by the end, various members had threatened to leave The Replacements. Band morale was low, and Westerberg later stated, "We'd much rather play for fifty people who know us than a thousand who don't care.

For the recording of their next studio album, The Replacements decided to return to Blackberry Way Studios in late 1983. The band considered R.E.M.'s guitarist Peter Buck as producer, but when they met him in Athens, Georgia, they did not have enough material to begin recording. Instead, Jesperson and Steve Fjelstad co-produced the album. The new material placed more of a focus on songwriting and the music was influenced by heavy metal, arena rock and Chicago blues. Instruments such as piano, twelve-string guitar and mandolin featured throughout the album. The new album included songs such as "I Will Dare", which featured Buck playing lead guitar, "Androgynous", with Westerberg on piano, and "Unsatisfied", where, according to writer Michael Azerrad, Westerberg "had hit upon a moving new way to declare that he can't get no satisfaction." Let It Be was released in October 1984 to critical acclaim.

It's release attracted attention from the major record labels, and by late 1984 several had expressed an interest in signing the band. Financially, the band was not doing well; they were not selling enough records to recoup their expenses, and money from shows went to recording costs, hotels, travel and instrument repairs. Twin/Tone was not being paid reliably by distributors and the sales of Let It Be were not high enough to justify extra promotion. "It was time for a major label to take over," according to the label's co-owner Stark. The band was close to a major label contract, but often alienated label representatives by intentionally performing badly in concert; their 1985 live album, The Shit Hits the Fans, was an example of their concert performances at the time.

One label, the Warner Bros. Records subsidiary Sire Records, eventually signed The Replacements. The band admired the label head Seymour Stein, who had managed the Ramones. The Replacements' first major-label album, Tim, was scheduled to be produced by Westerberg's idol, Alex Chilton, but the sessions fell through; the album was produced by former Ramone Tommy Erdelyi. Upon its release in 1985, Tim garnered rave reviews that equalled those for Let It Be. Though the band was poised for a popular breakthrough, they were unsure about making the leap into the mainstream.  As a result, they never let themselves live up to their full potential. The Replacements landed a spot on Saturday Night Live, but they were roaring drunk throughout their performances and Westerberg said "f*ck" on the air. Their concerts had became notorious for such drunken, sloppy behavior. Frequently, the band was barely able to stand up, let alone play, and when they did play, they often didn't finish their songs. The Replacements also refused to make accessible videos -- the video for "Bastards of Young" featured nothing but a stereo system, playing the song -- thereby cutting themselves off from the mass exposure MTV could have granted them.

After the tour for Tim, the Replacements fired Bob Stinson, partly for being unwilling to play the band's "less rocked-out" material, and partly for being too drunk to try. They also fired Jesperson the same year. "It was like being thrown out of a club that you helped start," Jesperson later commented. The Replacements recorded their next album as a trio in Memphis, TN, with former Big Star producer Jim Dickinson. The resulting album, Pleased to Meet Me, was more streamlined than their previous recordings. Again, the reviews were uniformly excellent upon its spring 1987 release, but the band didn't earn many new fans. During the tour for Pleased to Meet Me, guitarist Slim Dunlap filled the vacant lead guitarist spot and he became a full-time member after the tour.

Two years later, the band returned in the spring of 1989 with Don't Tell a Soul, The Replacements' last bid for a mainstream audience. The bandmembers had cleaned up, admitting that their years of drug and alcohol abuse were behind them, and were now willing to play the promotional game. Don't Tell a Soul boasted a polished, radio-ready production and the group shot MTV-friendly videos, beginning with the single "I'll Be You." Initially, the approach worked -- "I'll Be You" became a number one album rock track, crossing over to number 51 on the pop charts. However, Don't Tell a Soul never really took off and failed to establish the band as a major commercial force.

Defeated from the lackluster performance of Don't Tell a Soul, Paul Westerberg planned on recording a solo album, but Sire rejected the idea. Consequently, the next Replacements album, All Shook Down, was a solo Westerberg record in all but name. Recorded with a cast of session musicians as well as the band, All Shook Down was a stripped-down, largely acoustic affair that hinted at the turmoil within the band. Chris Mars left shortly after its fall 1990 release, claiming that Westerberg had assumed control of the band; he would launch a solo career two years later. The Replacements toured in support of All Shook Down, with Steve Foley, formerly of the Minneapolis-based Things Fall Down, as their new drummer. Neither the tour nor the album were successful, and The Replacements quietly disbanded in the summer of 1991.

Tommy Stinson quickly followed his time in The Replacements with the short-lived but fan favorite bands Bash & Pop and Perfect. He has been the bass guitarist for Guns N' Roses since 1998, replacing the original member Duff McKagan. In 2004, he released a solo CD, Village Gorilla Head, followed in 2011 by One Man Mutiny. Dunlap released a solo album in 1993. Bob Stinson died February 15, 1995, from a drug overdose. Westerberg began a solo career slowly, releasing two songs on the Singles ("Dyslexic Heart," "Waiting for Somebody") soundtrack in 1992; he also scored the film. He released his debut solo album, 14 Songs, in the summer of 1993 to mixed reviews. Paul Westerberg's second solo album, Eventually, was released in the spring of 1996.

On April 22, 2008, Rhino released re-mastered deluxe editions of the band's four Twin/Tone albums with rare bonus tracks. On September 24, 2008, Rhino similarly released the four Sire albums as deluxe editions. On October 3, 2012, it was announced that The Replacements had reformed and that Westerberg and Tommy Stinson were in the studio recording an EP containing song cover versions. Titled Songs for Slim, the EP was sold in a 250-copy edition of 10" vinyl and auctioned online to benefit former bandmate Dunlap, who had suffered a stroke. The Replacements played their first shows in 22 years at Riot Fest in Toronto (24–25 August 2013), Chicago (13–15 September) and Denver (21–22 September). Dave Minehan, guitarist/vocalist, and drummer Josh Freese rounded out the line-up for these shows.

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Part of the Replacements' appeal always was that they didn't quite fit into any tidy category and nowhere was that truer than on their 1981 debut, Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash. Falling over themselves to fit into the Minneapolis hardcore scene, the 'Mats played fast and loose, which was part of the problem -- they were too loose, lacking the discipline to fit within hardcore, which even in '81 was adhering to the loud-fast rules that would later morph into straight-edge. Then again, that was a common problem in the Twin Cities, as Hüsker Dü also were too big and blustery to be a standard hardcore band, but where the Huskers traded in violence and fury at this early stage, the Replacements wallowed in cheap thrills. Danger still pulsated in their music, but the group didn't inflict emotional damage: they were a party spinning out of control, getting sloppier with every beer swilled. The messiness on Sorry Ma is hardly confined to the cheap, thin recording or the band's playing -- they sound as if they're stumbling upon each other as they fumble for the next chord -- but how the songs pile up one after another, most not managing to get close to the two-minute mark. Such brevity could be dubbed as hardcore, but apart from the volume and speed, this doesn't feel like hardcore: there's too much beer and boogie for that. Then, there's also the fact that the Replacements reveled in mid-American junk culture, with Paul Westerberg boasting that he'd bought himself a headache the very year that Black Flag sneered that they had nothing better to do then having a bottle of brew as they watched the TV. Neither did the Replacements, but they sang about this with no disdain, as they enjoyed being "Shiftless When Idle," as one of the best songs here called it. This could be called defiant if it seemed like the 'Mats were raging against anything besides garden-variety suburban troubles, as there's nothing that attacks other punkers (quite the opposite; there are love letters to Johnny Thunders and Hüsker Dü), and even when Westerberg is chronicling Midwestern ennui, there's a sense of affection to his laments, as if he loves the place and loves acting like an angry young crank. This strain of premature curmudgeonly humor is undercut by the boundless energy of the band, so happy to make noise they don't care if they're recycling old-time rock & roll riffs that are closer to amped-up Rockpile than the Ramones, as there's more swing to the rhythms than that -- swing that careens wildly and madly, but swings all the same. And that's what made the Replacements seem so different with their debut -- they didn't fit anywhere within American punk, but there's no defiance here; there's a celebration of who and what they are that's genuinely, infectiously guileless. It may not quite sound like any other American punk record but Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash is one of the best LPs the entire scene produced in the early '80s.



The Replacements - Sorry Ma, Forgot To Take Out The Trash  (flac 429mb)

01 Takin A Ride 2:23
02 Careless 1:08
03 Customer 1:29
04 Hangin Downtown 2:06
05 Kick Your Door Down 3:11
06 Otto 2:09
07 I Bought A Headache 2:25
08 Rattlesnake 1:47
09 I Hate Music 1:50
10 Johnny's Gonna Die 3:32
11 Shiftless When Idle 2:18
12 More Cigarettes 1:19
13 Don't Ask Why 1:57
14 Something To Dü 1:41
15 I'm In Trouble 2:10
16 Love You Till Friday 1:53
17 Shutup 1:23
18 Raised In The City 1:57
Bonus Material
19 Raised In The City (Demo) 2:17
20 Shutup (Demo) 1:40
21 Don't Turn Me Down (Demo) 1:55
22 Shape Up (Demo) 2:12
23 You Ain't Gotta Dance (Demo) 2:24
24 Get On The Stick (Studio Demo) 1:39
25 Oh Baby (Studio Demo) 1:18
26 Like You (Outtake) 1:45
27 Get Lost (Outtake) 2:28
28 A Toe Needs A Shoe (Outtake) 2:09
29 Customer (Alternate Take) 1:33
30 Basement Jam (Rehearsal) 3:33
31 If Only You Were Lonely 2:54

The Replacements - Sorry Ma, Forgot To Take Out The Trash  (ogg 154mb)

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Almost as if they were aware that Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash was masquerading as a hardcore album, the Replacements designed their second record as a mean, lean, nasty, brutish affair, the opposite of the mirthfully messy Sorry Ma. Stink wasn't even a full-fledged album -- at eight tracks, it was labeled a mini-LP, maybe just a bit longer than an EP, but it was just scraping by at 14 minutes regardless of what label it wore. So, it was tighter than Sorry Ma but that wasn't the only way Stink seemed more like a hardcore record: the band approximated a hardcore rave-up at the end of the white blooze parody "White and Lazy," and Paul Westerberg's songs bristled with anger against all manner of middle-class irritants, as he spit vitriol at his "God Damn Job" and told school to go f*ck itself. Such a sudden burst of anger could almost seem parodic, especially with such snide jokes as the Frère Jacques chorus of "Gimme Noise," if the Replacements didn't sound so lethal: they're hard and merciless, never stopping for air. This is where the brevity of Stink is in its favor -- not that it would be too much to take if it were longer, but at such a brief length this dose of thunder is positively addictive. And only when it starts to roll away does it sink in that Westerberg wrote his first genuine anthem with the great "Kids Don't Follow."



The Replacements - Stink  (flac 179mb)

01 Kids Don't Follow 2:18
02 Fuck School 1:25
03 Stuck In The Middle 1:46
04 God Damn Job 1:16
05 White And Lazy 2:06
06 Dope Smokin Moron 1:31
07 Go 2:28
08 Gimme Noise 1:35
Bonus Material
09 Staples Her Stomach 1:28
10 Hey, Good Lookin' 1:48
11 (We're Gonna) Rock Around The Clock (Outtake) 3:01
12 You're Getting Married (Solo Home Demo) 4:35

The Replacements - Stink  (ogg 62mb)

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Hootenanny is the place where the Replacements began to branch out from the breakneck punk that characterized their first two records -- which isn't quite the same thing as growing up, however. The brilliant thing about Hootenanny is that it teeters at the brink of maturity but never makes the dive into that deep pool. Paul Westerberg nevertheless dips a toe into those murky waters with "Color Me Impressed," as good an angst-ridden rocker as he would ever write, and the heartbroken "Within Your Reach," which presented a break from the Replacements' past in its slower tempo, driven by a stiff yet sad drum loop, and its vulnerability. Not long after this, Westerberg's vulnerability would become central to the 'Mats, although here he's keeping it way in check, but Hootenanny has something better to offer than a collection of soul-searching ballads: it offers the manic, reckless spirit so key to the Replacements' legend. All the myths of the Replacements at their peak speak to how it seemed like anything could happen at one of their shows, how Bob Stinson could blow out his amplifiers, how Westerberg would stumble through impromptu kitsch covers, how it could seem like the band would never make it to the end of the show. Well, Hootenanny is the only record of theirs where it seems like they may not make it to the end of the album, so ragged and reckless it is. It lurches to life with the folk piss-take "Hootenanny" before spinning out of control with "Run It," a piece of faux-core harder and funnier than anything on Stink. Hootenanny continues to bounce from extreme to extreme, stopping for a Beatles parody on "Mr. Whirly" and the instrumental "Buck Hill" before Westerberg reads out personal ads on "Lovelines." Almost all of the album's 12 songs could be seen as slight on their own merits, but the whole is greater than its individual parts, not just in how it is a breathless good time, but how this album offers a messy break from American punk traditions, ushering in an era of irony and self-deprecation that came to define much of American underground rock in the next decade. Nowhere is the Replacements' influence clearer than on Hootenanny, and although they made better records, no other one captures what the band was all about better than this.



The Replacements - Hootenanny  ( flac 335mb)

01 Hootenanny 1:52
02 Run It 1:12
03 Color Me Impressed 2:27
04 Willpower 4:20
05 Take Me Down To The Hospital 3:47
06 Mr. Whirly 1:58
07 Within Your Reach 4:25
08 Buck Hill 2:10
09 Lovelines 2:01
10 You Lose 1:42
11 Hayday 2:07
12 Treatment Bound 3:30
Bonus Material
13 Lookin' For Ya 1:57
14 Junior's Got A Gun (Outtake - Rough Mix) 2:08
15 Ain't No Crime (Outtake) 1:15
16 Johnny Fast (Outtake - Rough Mix) 2:28
17 Treatment Bound (Alternate Version) 3:16
18 Lovelines (Alternate Vocal) 2:05
19 Bad Worker (Solo Home Demo) 4:15

The Replacements - Hootenanny  (ogg 118mb)

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