Jan 31, 2013

RhoDeo 1304 Goldy Rhox 93


Hello, today the 93rd post of GoldyRhox, classic pop rock. Today in the blacklight are a British rock band formed in 1969 under the name ”Daddy” before renaming themselves in early 1970. Though their music was initially categorised as progressive rock, they have since incorporated a combination of traditional Rock, pop and art rock into their music. The band's work is marked by the inventive songwriting of Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson, the distinctive voice of Hodgson, and the prominent use of Wurlitzer electric piano and saxophone in their songs.

While the band's early work was mainstream progressive rock, they would enjoy greater critical and commercial success when they incorporated more conventional and radio-friendly elements into their work in the mid-1970s, going on to sell more than 60 million albums.They reached their peak of commercial success with todays mystery album, which has sold more than 20 million copies.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Todays mystery album is the sixth album by the band, released in 1979. It was recorded the previous year at the Village Recorder in Los Angeles. It featured four U.S. Billboard hit singles: In the UK, "The Logical Song" and the title track were both top 10 hits, the only two the group had in their native country. It won two Grammy Awards in 1980, and holds an RIAA certification of quadruple platinum. In France, the album is the biggest selling English language album of all time, and the third biggest seller overall.

The album's front cover resembles an overlook of New York City through an aeroplane window. It was designed by Mike Doud and depicted Kate Murtagh, dressed as a waitress named "Libby" from a diner, as a Statue of Liberty figure holding up a glass of orange juice on a small plate in one hand (in place of the torch on the Statue), and a foldable restaurant menu in the other hand.



Goldy Rhox 93   (flac 262mb)

Goldy Rhox 93  ( ogg 103mb)


previously re-post

Goldy Rhox 8 106mb

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Jan 30, 2013

RhoDeo 1304 Aetix


Hello,  snow is gone now, back to rain, back in time, back to the Aetix

Over the years, the Pretenders became a vehicle for guitarist/vocalist Chrissie Hynde's songwriting, yet it was a full-fledged band when it was formed in the late '70s. With their initial records, the group crossed the bridge between punk/new wave and Top 40 pop more than any other band, recording a series of hard, spiky singles that were also melodic and immediately accessible. Hynde was an invigorating, sexy singer who bent the traditional male roles of rock & roll to her own liking, while guitarist James Honeyman-Scott created a sonic palette filled with suspended chords, effects pedals, and syncopated rhythms that proved remarkably influential over the next two decades.  .....  N'Joy

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Over the years, the Pretenders became a vehicle for guitarist/vocalist Chrissie Hynde's songwriting, yet it was a full-fledged band when it was formed in the late '70s. With their initial records, the group crossed the bridge between punk/new wave and Top 40 pop more than any other band, recording a series of hard, spiky singles that were also melodic and immediately accessible. Hynde was an invigorating, sexy singer who bent the traditional male roles of rock & roll to her own liking, while guitarist James Honeyman-Scott created a sonic palette filled with suspended chords, effects pedals, and syncopated rhythms that proved remarkably influential over the next two decades. After Honeyman-Scott's death, the Pretenders became a more straightforward rock band, yet Hynde's semi-autobiographical songwriting and bracing determination meant that the group never became just another rock band, even when their music became smoother and more pop-oriented.


Originally from Akron, OH, Hynde moved to England in the early '70s, when she was in her twenties. British rock journalist Nick Kent helped her begin writing for New Musical Express; she wrote for the newspaper during the mid-'70s. She also worked in Malcolm McLaren's SEX boutique before she began performing. After playing with Chris Spedding, she joined Jack Rabbit; she quickly left the band and formed the Berk Brothers.  In 1978, Hynde formed the Pretenders, which eventually consisted of Honeyman-Scott, bassist Pete Farndon, and drummer Martin Chambers. Later in the year, they recorded a version of Ray Davies' "Stop Your Sobbing" produced by Nick Lowe. The single made it into the British Top 40 in early 1979. "Kid" and "Brass in Pocket," the group's next two singles, also were successful. Their debut album, Pretenders, was released in early 1980 and eventually climbed to number one in the U.K. The band were nearly as successful in America, with the album reaching the Top Ten and "Brass in Pocket" reaching number 14.

During an American tour in 1980, Hynde met Ray Davies and the two fell in love. Following a spring 1981 EP, Extended Play, the group released their second album, Pretenders II. Although it fared well on the charts, it repeated the musical ideas of their debut. In June of 1982, Pete Farndon was kicked out of the band, due to his drug abuse. A mere two days later on June 16, James Honeyman-Scott was found dead of an overdose of heroin and cocaine. Pregnant with Davies' child, Hynde went into seclusion following Honeyman-Scott's death. In 1983, two months after Hynde gave birth, Farndon also died of a drug overdose.

Hynde regrouped the Pretenders in February 1983, adding former Manfred Mann's Earth Band guitarist Robbie McIntosh and bassist Malcolm Foster; the reconstituted band released "2000 Miles" in time for Christmas. The new Pretenders released Learning to Crawl early in 1984 to positive reviews and commercial success. Ending her romance with Ray Davies, Hynde married Jim Kerr, the lead vocalist of Simple Minds, in May of 1984.  Apart from a performance at Live Aid, the only musical activity from the Pretenders during 1985 was Hynde's appearance on UB40's version of "I Got You Babe." Hynde assembled another version of the Pretenders for 1986's Get Close. Only she and McIntosh remained from Learning to Crawl; the rest of the album was recorded with session musicians. Get Close showed the Pretenders moving closer to MOR territory, with the bouncy single "Don't Get Me Wrong" making its way into the American Top Ten in 1987. Hynde recorded another duet with UB40 in 1988, a cover of Dusty Springfield's "Breakfast in Bed."

Hynde's marriage to Kerr fell apart in 1990, the same year the Pretenders released Packed!, which failed to ignite the charts in either America or Britain. She was relatively quiet for the next few years, re-emerging in 1994 with Last of the Independents, which was hailed as a comeback by some quarters of the press. The album did return the Pretenders to the Top 40 with the ballad "I'll Stand by You." In the fall of 1995, the Pretenders released the live album Isle of View, then remained silent for a few years. Hynde finally returned in 1999 with an album of new material, Viva el Amor. Three years later, the Pretenders left their longtime label for Artemis. The reggae-tinged Loose Screw appeared in November and a tour followed in January 2003. During March 2005, the Pretenders were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Only Hynde and Chambers attended the ceremony. After their Hall of Fame induction, the Pretenders continued touring as a four-part team (Hynde, Seymour, Hobson and Chambers). During 2005, bassist Hobson left and was replaced by Nick Wilkinson, marking the band's first line-up change in thirteen years.

The Pretenders' album Break Up the Concrete was released through Shangri-La Music on 7 October 2008. It was the band's first Top 40 album in the US in twenty two years. Tracks include "Boots of Chinese Plastic", "Don't Cut Your Hair", "Love's a Mystery", "The Last Ride" and "Almost Perfect".[7] With Hynde was the guitarist James Walbourne, pedal steel player Eric Heywood, bassist Nick Wilkinson and drummer Jim Keltner (on the album only). Chambers returned to the drums on tour with the band. A show from the tour, filmed at Shepherd's Bush Empire in London on 15 July 2009, was released on CD with bonus DVD / Blu-ray on 9 February 2010, titled Pretenders: Live in London.


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Few rock & roll records rock as hard or with as much originality as the Pretenders' eponymous debut album. A sleek, stylish fusion of Stonesy rock & roll, new wave pop, and pure punk aggression, Pretenders is teeming with sharp hooks and a viciously cool attitude. Although Chrissie Hynde establishes herself as a forceful and distinctively feminine songwriter, the record isn't a singer/songwriter's tour de force -- it's a rock & roll album, powered by a unique and aggressive band. Guitarist James Honeyman-Scott never plays conventional riffs or leads, and his phased, treated guitar gives new dimension to the pounding rhythms of "Precious," "Tattooed Love Boys," "Up the Neck," and "The Wait," as well as the more measured pop of "Kid," "Brass in Pocket," and "Mystery Achievement." He provides the perfect backing for Hynde and her tough, sexy swagger. Hynde doesn't fit into any conventional female rock stereotype, and neither do her songs, alternately displaying a steely exterior or a disarming emotional vulnerability. It's a deep, rewarding record, whose primary virtue is its sheer energy. Pretenders moves faster and harder than most rock records, delivering an endless series of melodies, hooks, and infectious rhythms in its 12 songs. Few albums, let alone debuts, are ever this astonishingly addictive. Pretenders debuted at number 1 on the UK Albums Chart in the week of its release and stayed there for four consecutive weeks. It also made the top 10 on the Billboard 200 and was certified Platinum during 1982 by the RIAA. In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the album number 155 on its list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.



The Pretenders - Pretenders I (flac 277mb)

01 Precious 3:34
02 The Phone Call 2:27
03 Up The Neck 4:24
04 Tattooed Love Boys 2:58
05 Space Invader 3:26
06 The Wait 3:34
07 Stop Your Sobbing 2:38
08 Kid 3:04
09 Private Life 6:23
10 Brass In Pocket 3:01
11 Lovers Of Today 5:50
12 Mystery Achievement 5:23

The Pretenders - Pretenders I  ( ogg 100mb)

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Essentially, this album is an unabashed sequel, offering more of the same sound, attitude, and swagger, including titles that seem like rips on their predecessors and another Ray Davies cover. This gives the record a bit too much of a pat feeling, especially since the band seems to have a lost a bit of momentum -- they don't rock as hard, Chrissie Hynde's songwriting isn't as consistent, James Honeyman-Scott isn't as inventive or clever. The first incarnation of The Pretenders was a tremendous band, and even if they offer diminished returns, it's still diminished returns on good material, and much of Pretenders II is quite enjoyable. Yes, it's a little slicker and more stylized than its predecessor, and, yes, there's a little bit of filler, yet any album where rockers as tough as "Message of Love" and "The Adultress" are balanced by a pop tune as lovely as "Talk of the Town" is hard to resist. And when you realize that this fantastic band only recorded two albums, you take that second album, warts and all, because the teaming of Hynde and Honeyman-Scott was one of the great pairs, and it's utterly thrilling to hear them together, even when the material isn't quite up to the high standards they set the first time around.



The Pretenders - Pretenders II   ( flac 290mb)

01 The Adultress 3:58
02 Bad Boys Get Spanked 4:07
03 Message Of Love 3:28
04 I Go To Sleep 2:57
05 Birds Of Paradise 4:16
06 Talk Of The Town 2:45
07 Pack It Up 3:52
08 Waste Not Want Not 3:46
09 Day After Day 3:47
10 Jealous Dogs 5:38
11 The English Roses 4:31
12 Louie Louie 3:29

The Pretenders - Pretenders II    (ogg 104mb)

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The Pretenders' meteoric rise came to a crashing halt in 1982, when drug abuse claimed the life of guitarist James Honeyman-Scott and forced Hynde and drummer Martin Chambers to dump bassist Pete Farndon, who would also succumb to an OD in April 1983. Hynde was forced by circumstance to reinvent the Pretenders for their third album, 1984's Learning to Crawl, but if the new edition of the group lacked some of the spark of the band that made the first two LPs, through sheer force of will Hynde created a masterpiece. Robbie McIntosh (guitar) and Malcolm Foster (bass) were recruited to join Hynde and Chambers, and the band was now officially a quartet. It was this line-up that recorded the majority of the tracks featured on Learning to Crawl. While Hynde hardly held back in her emotionally potent songwriting in the Pretenders' early work, on Learning to Crawl there's a gravity to her lyrics that blended with her tough but wiry melodic sense and streetwise intelligence to create a set of truly remarkable tunes. "Back on the Chain Gang" is a touching tribute to her fallen comrades that still sounds bitterly rueful, "Middle of the Road" is a furious rocker that explores the emotional and physical toll of a musician's life, "Time the Avenger" is a taut, literate examination of a businessman's adulterous relationship, "My City Was Gone" deals with the economic and cultural decay of the Midwest in a manner both pithy and genuinely heartfelt, and "2000 Miles" is a Christmas number that demonstrates Hynde can be warm without getting sappy. As a guitarist, Robbie McIntosh brought a simpler and more elemental style to the Pretenders than James Honeyman-Scott, but his tough, muscular leads fit these songs well, and bassist Malcolm Foster's solid punch fits Chambers' drumming perfectly. Three albums into her recording career, Chrissie Hynde found herself having to put the past to bed and carve out a new beginning for herself with Learning to Crawl, but she pulled it off with a striking mixture of courage, strength, and great rock & roll; with the exception of the instant-classic debut album, it's the Pretenders' finest work. Hynde named the album "Learning to Crawl" because her daughter, Natalie Rae Hynde, was learning to crawl at the time that Chrissie was trying to determine a name for the album.



The Pretenders - Learning To Crawl  (flac 266mb)

01 Middle Of The Road 4:08
02 Back On The Chain Gang 3:44
03 Time The Avenger 4:47
04 Watching The Clothes 2:48
05 Show Me 4:00
06 Thumbelina 3:12
07 My City Was Gone 5:14
08 Thin Line Between Love And Hate 3:33
09 I Hurt You 4:27
10 2000 Miles 3:30

The Pretenders - Learning To Crawl    (ogg 93mb)
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Jan 29, 2013

RhoDeo 1304 Roots


Hello, i'm having some upload difficulties with my regulars, hopefully temporairy but here goes... Since the mid eighties, UK was established as the new center of dub production, with originators Mad Professor and Jah Shaka, paving the way for a all new open minded generation of producers, DJs, soundsystems and studios, followers of steppers approach, and willing to preserve and pass on dis tradition. Embodying in the sound a whole new kind of digital and electronic musical variations, like drum n bass, jungle, techno, dubstep…they keep on to perpetuate and recreate the diversity and originality within the style till present days.

A disciple of Lee "Scratch" Perry, Mad Professor was one of the leading producers in dub reggae's second generation. His Dub Me Crazy albums helped dub make the transition into the digital age, when electronic productions started to take over mainstream reggae in the '80s. His space-age tracks not only made use of new digital technology, but often expanded dub's sonic blueprint, adding more elements and layers of sound than his forebears typically did.  .... N'joy

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Mad Professor was born Neal Fraser (or Neil Fraser) circa 1955 in Guyana, a small country in the northern part of South America. He earned his nickname as a preteen, thanks to his intense interest in electronics; he even built his own radio. At age 13, his family moved to London, and around age 20, he started collecting recording equipment: reel-to-reel tape decks, echo and reverb effects, and the like. In 1979, he built his own mixing board and opened a four-track studio in his living room in the south London area of Thornton Heath. Calling it Ariwa, after a Nigerian word for sound or communication, he began recording bands and vocalists for his own label of the same name, mostly in the lovers rock vein: Deborahe Glasgow, Aquizim, Sergeant Pepper, Tony Benjamin, Davina Stone, and Ranking Ann, among others. Amid complaints from his neighbors, he moved the studio to a proper facility in Peckham, South London. In 1982 he recorded his first album, Dub Me Crazy, Pt. 1, and quickly followed it with a second volume, the successful Beyond the Realms of Dub. 1983 brought two more volumes, The African Connection (acclaimed) and the fairly popular Escape to the Asylum of Dub.
The Ariwa studio was moved to a better neighborhood in West Norwood during the mid-'80s, and upgraded for 24-track capability, making it the largest black-owned studio in the U.K. From there, Mad Professor really started to make an impact on the British reggae scene. He produced major hit singles for Ariwa mainstay Pato Banton and Sandra Cross, and also helmed the breakthrough album for conscious reggae toaster Macka B, 1986's Sign of the Times. At the same time, the ragga era was dawning, and all-digital productions began to take over reggae. As the ragga sound grew more and more dominant, Mad Professor's brand of dub got spacier and weirder; while ragga detractors complained that Mad Professor's work sounded sterile compared to the dub of old, many praised his otherworldly effects and inventive arrangements. The Dub Me Crazy albums reached the height of their experimentalism during the latter part of the '80s, although by the early '90s they were showing signs of creative burnout. The 12th and final volume in the series, Dub Maniacs on the Rampage, was released in 1993.

Meanwhile, Ariwa continued to prosper as a label, with further hits by the likes of Macka B, Pato Banton, Sandra Cross, female singer Kofi, Intense, Jah Shaka, John McLean, the Robotics, Sister Audrey, Peter Culture, Johnny Clark, and others. Additionally, he began to collaborate with some of reggae's better-known figures; most crucially, he teamed up with main influence Lee "Scratch" Perry for the first time on the 1989 set Mystic Warrior. In 1991, he produced the first of several albums for the groundbreaking veteran DJ U-Roy, the acclaimed True Born African; he also went on to work with the likes of Yabby You and Bob Andy. He switched his focus to touring in 1992 and released the 100th album on Ariwa not long after.

With his high-profile collaborators, Mad Professor started to make a name for himself outside of the reggae community, and soon found himself in demand as a remixer for rock, R&B, and electronica acts. Over the course of the '90s and into the new millennium, he would remix tracks by Sade, the Orb, the KLF, the Beastie Boys, Jamiroquai, Rancid, Depeche Mode, and Perry Farrell, among others. His best-known project, however -- and the one that truly established his credentials -- was 1995's No Protection, a completely reimagined version of trip-hop collective Massive Attack's second album, Protection. Perhaps creatively refreshed, Mad Professor's own albums started to regain their consistency in the mid-'90s.

Mixing electronics with rootsier, more organic sounds indebted to the earliest days of dub, he left behind the Dub Me Crazy moniker to launch a new series, the subtly Afrocentric Black Liberation Dub. The first volume was released in 1994, and others followed steadily into the new millennium, albeit at a less prolific pace than the Dub Me Crazy installments. More collaborations with Perry and U-Roy followed as well. In 2005, Mad Professor celebrated Ariwa's 25th anniversary with a tour of the U.K. alongside Perry and the double-CD retrospective Method to the Madness. In 2009 he released several albums, Times Hard under the moniker Mad Professor vs. Joint Chiefs and the back to basics Audio Illusion of Dub as well as Revolution Feat. Pato Banton And Mr. Professor, Nairobi Meets Mad Professor – Wu Wei, and in 2010 Izrael Meets Mad Professor and Joe Ariwa and in 2012 The Roots of Dubstep. Neal "Mad Professor" Fraser has been a prolific producer, contributing to or producing nearly 200 albums.

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Under the Spell of Dub touches base with many of the Mad Professor's influences, complete with rhythms courtesy of the Robotics and guest vocals from the likes of Lee "Scratch" Perry, Macka B and Dennis Nolan. Another strong outing.



Mad Professor - Under The Spell Of Dub (flac  322mb)

01 Mental Bondage 4:24
02 Internet Spy 4:20
03 Santero Dub 4:46
04 Mad Elaine 4:46
05 Brewing Storm 4:39
06 False Curl Girl 3:38
07 Cracking The Code 5:03
08 Meltdown Dub 4:11
09 Black Panther Dub 3:57
10 Theme From Darumba 3:57
11 Master Race 3:38
12 Master Plan 4:11
13 Robotronic 4:05

Mad Professor - Under The Spell Of Dub (ogg 131mb)

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Longtime Mad Professor fans only need to take a look at the jaw-droppingly great track list to declare Method to the Madness a major success, one that serves both as an excellent introduction to the man's work and a wonderful roundup of tracks that saves veterans the trouble of carrying a large stack of CDs and CD singles. Sanctuary has been working the Trojan catalog hard with a generally great series of reissues, but the label has outdone itself this time by reaching outside the Trojan catalog for a change and offering the first ambitious Mad Professor compilation to the world. The U.K.-based reggae producer is often characterized as a crazed dubman, but Method to the Madness is also filled with lovers rock that mixes in some new wave attitude, urgent ragga that's synthetic musically but roots lyrically, along with the trippy, free-spirited experimental dub the man is famous for. Disc two of the set is the outward stunner. Filled with the Professor's spacy dub mixes of Massive Attack, the Orb, Jamiroquai, and the legendary Lee "Scatch" Perry, disc two shows why left-field popsters approach the Professor whenever they need a "mind-blowing" B-side and why maverick bassist Barry Adamson once declared, "every album should have a Mad Professor remix." Going from druggy dub noir with the Ruts to cosmopolitan chillout-room bliss with Perry Farrell, disc two is a surreal journey with an infectious beat, but it's equaled, if not topped, by the groundbreaking reggae cuts on disc one. More Professor-sourced and less drenched in dub, disc one serves up the feminist dancehall classic "Feminine Gender" by Ranking Ann, the snide "Echoes of Deaf Journalists," which finds the Robotiks as punky-funky as the Slits, and a exciting synthetic-soca instrumental from Pan Africanist. Aisha's dreamy "The Creator" will sound familiar to Orb fans while cuts from Horace Andy, Pato Banton, Earl 16, and Max Romeo cast the Professor as a groove-drivin' producer of urgent roots. Newcomers might be surprised how fun, slick, and bright this dub legend can be, and it's another tip of the hat to Sanctuary for sorting the light sounds and deep sounds and sequencing them into a seamless journey. The only quibbles you can make are that the cover artwork goes for the pop names -- misrepresenting how far-reaching the collection is -- and with such a deft selection of tracks, one wishes the disc count was three or four. If that were the case, maybe Method to the Madness wouldn't have the punch it has, and after all, compilations are often jumping-off points. There's plenty more sides to the man to explore, but Method to the Madness is far and away the door to enter.



Mad Professor ‎– Method To The Madness (Two Decades Of Crazy Dubs) 1 (flac  466mb)

01 Aquizim & Mad Professor - Kunta Kinte Dub 4:39
02 Johnnie Clarke - Nuclear Weapon 3:12
03 Ranking Ann - Feminine Gender 3:44
04 Pato Banton - My Opinion 5:41
05 Robotiks - Echoes Of Deaf Journalists 2:37
06 Aisha - The Creator 5:47
07 Sandra Cross & Wild Bunch - Country Living 4:43
08 John McLean - If I Gave My Heart 4:21
09 Macka B & Kofi - Dread A Who She Love 3:39
10 U Roy* Feat. Sister Audrey - True Born African 4:09
11 Horace Andy - Kunta Kinte 4:00
12 Chukki Star - The Almighty One 4:09
13 Queen Omega - Wicked Man 4:28
14 Pan Africanist - Elaine The Oska Dancer 4:33
15 Mad Professor & Scientist - Hungarian Ghoulash 4:27
16 Earl 16 - Niyabinghi 3:26
17 Max Romeo - Rasta Pickney 3:45
18 Mad Professor & Dub Revolutionarys - Ariwo Dub Rock 2:55

Mad Professor ‎– Method To The Madness (Two Decades Of Crazy Dubs) 1 (ogg 171mb)

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Mad Professor ‎– Method To The Madness (Two Decades Of Crazy Dubs) 2 (flac  362mb)

01 Ruts DC & Mad Professor - Pleasures Of The Dance 5:08
02 Brilliant - It's A Dub Dub Dub World 4:45
03 Lee Perry & Mad Professor - Mad Man Dubwise 6:29
04 The Orb - Towers Of Dub 14:49
05 Jamiroquai - Drifting Dub 4:42
06 The Young Gods - Dub The Sun 4:36
07 Massive Attack - Sly (Eternal Feedback Dub) 6:25
08 Perry Farrell - King Z3:33
09 Mad Professor - 1835 (Unreleased Mix) 4:20
10 Jack Adaptor - WatchingThe Sunset Dub 3:34
11 Mad Professor & Crazy Caribs - 50 Pence Dub 3:41

Mad Professor ‎– Method To The Madness (Two Decades Of Crazy Dubs) 2 (ogg 143mb)

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Mad Professor - Dub You Crazy (flac 198mb)

01 Intro Mad Professor 0:19
02 Robotiks Dub Song 3:41
03 Binga Bongo 3:46
04 Black Light Dub 3:21
05 Dub the Planet 3:34
06 Dub the Planet 3:27
07 Black Ice Dub 3:51
08 Branding Dub See (Mad Professor Mix) 3:17
09 Branding Dub See (Joe Ariwa Mix) 3:19
10 Brother X See 3:54
11 Theme From Mandinka See 3:09
12 Tjerreng Dub See 3:26

Mad Professor - Dub You Crazy (ogg 082mb)

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Jan 28, 2013

RhoDeo 1304 Byron 18


Hello, Earth still spinning for it's Earthlings, it may break apart here and there but it's always dun that no need to worry. What is worrying slightly is the fact that today we've reached the end of the Byron Chronicles at least it last broadcast thusfar. Next week new starzzz

Meanwhile you can listen to the thusfar last episode saga of The Byron Chronicles season 4 ...NJoy

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From The Byron Chronicles Introduction

“Imagine if the world as you know it… was nothing more than an illusion. What if creatures like elves, dragons, vampires, zombies and werewolves walk amongst you every day… But you never see them.”

“This is the world I walk in.
 I am called Byron
 And these are my chronicles…“

The Byron Chronicles is a dark urban fantasy written and produced by Darker Projects, an audio drama company with an extensive website.  The site is well laid out and all of their shows can be heard free of charge direct from the website or  as podcasts, while your on  the go. The Darker Projects website hosts many shows, but I have chosen to focus on The Byron Chronicles for this review.

The Byron chronicles center around a being simply called Byron, who is something “other than human”. Byron lives in the shadows of our modern world, where vampires, werewolves and other creatures of fantasy are very real, but kept hidden from human eyes. The separation of  the supernatural world from the human world is an important element through out the entire series. We quickly find out that when the two worlds mix violence  seems to ensue, usually leading to bad things for humans and supernaturals alike. In fact, the only person who seems to think humans and supernatural beings can get along is Byron himself, who tends to act as a mediator between the two.

Joining Byron on these adventures is Miss Chris Sparrow, who once led a “normal life” as a Barrista at a local Portland Oregon coffee shop before being turned into a half vampire in a freak accident. Chris turned to Byron reluctantly at first, but the pair quickly became fast friends as Chris came to rely on Byron for guidance while supernatural world revealed itself to her. Byron in turn, seemed to rely on Chris in helping him better understand humans as a whole. There were several plot lines in the first season, including Byron saving the life of Lazarus the First Zombie, and preventing a worldwide zombie outbreak in the process. Then Byron had to hunt down a vampire lord named Branlaven, who was selling a super drug called “rush” on the streets of Portland. It was the drug Rush which caused Chris to become a half vampire, and it was here that Chris Sparrow made her first appearance in the series. Next, Byron was taken hostage by two different secret societies; each one trying to save the world from “monsters” like Byron.

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1-403 The Night of '68
October 1968. Bodies of the recently dead are returning to life and feeding upon the living. Byron must find a way to stop the night of living death.



The Byron Chronicles 4 (3) ( 29mb)

01 The Byron Chronicles 403 The Night of 68 (21:16)

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previously

Byron's Tale ( 63mb)
The Byron Chronicles 1 (2,3) ( 67mb)
The Byron Chronicles 1 (4,5) ( 45mb)
The Byron Chronicles 1 (6,7) ( 42mb)
The Byron Chronicles 1 (8,9) ( 90mb)
The Byron Chronicles 2 (1,2) ( 90mb)
The Byron Chronicles 2 (3,4a) ( 90mb)
The Byron Chronicles 2 (3,4a) ( 66mb)
The Byron Chronicles 2 (5,6) ( 44mb)
The Byron Chronicles 2 (7,8) ( 49mb)
The Byron Chronicles 2 (9,10) ( 49mb)
The Byron Chronicles 3 (1,2) ( 76mb)
The Byron Chronicles 3 (3,4) ( 58mb)
The Byron Chronicles 3 (5,6) ( 66mb)
The Byron Chronicles 3 (7,8) ( 47mb)
The Byron Chronicles 3 (9,10) ( 42mb)
The Byron Chronicles 4 (1,2) ( 52mb)

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Jan 27, 2013

Sundaze 1304


Hello, Sundaze time again, I hope last week's Inside Out is still impacting, nevertheless the daze continues on into the realm of a maverick German who ended up founding the progenitors of Krautrock, Can a band that exerted a considerable influence on avant-garde, experimental, underground, ambient, punk, post-punk, new wave and electronic music. By 76 the band dissolved and our man stepped out of the shadows in 79 releasing his first solo album, Movies here to try .... N'Joy

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A founding member of the enormously influential Krautrock group Can, Holger Czukay was one of the pivotal underground figures of his era; over the course of his long, expansive career, Czukay successfully bridged the gap between pop and the avant-garde, pioneering the use of samples and exploring the significance of world music on Western culture.

Czukay was born in Danzig (now Gdansk) on March 24, 1938. After falling in love with music at a young age, he spent his formative years studying to be a composer and conductor, but his ideas were frequently too radical for mainstream tastes; after being disqualified from one jazz festival for his "unclassifiable music," he was later expelled from Berlin's Music Academy for similar artistic insolence. He studied music under avant-garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen from 1963 to 1966, where he continued to refine his ideas, and soon became a teacher himself.  Initially Czukay had little interest in rock music, but this changed when a student, Michael Karoli played him The Beatles' 1967 song "I Am The Walrus," opening his ears to music by rock experimentalists like the Velvet Underground and Frank Zappa.

After picking up the bass, Czukay teamed with Karoli, fellow Stockhausen protege Irmin Schmidt, drummer Jaki Liebezeit and American-born vocalist Malcolm Mooney, and in early 1968 the group Inner Space was formed. Quickly renamed Can, in 1969 they released their debut Monster Movie, the first in a series of visionary albums establishing the band as one of the truly seminal artists of the period. At much the same time, Czukay teamed with Rolf Dammers to release an LP titled Canaxis 5, instituting both primitive sampling techniques (achieved with tape splices) and worldbeat influences; sculpted from thousands of recordings dubbed from short-wave radio broadcasts, the album employed samples from a number of international sources, and consequently positioned Czukay as an early proponent of world music appropriation.

After 1976's Flow Motion, Can disbanded, and three years later Czukay issued his debut solo effort Movies, a marked refinement of his short-wave sonic collage techniques, which became his trademark . The use of shortwave radio sounds and his early pioneering of sampling, in those days involving the painstaking cutting and splicing of magnetic tapes. He would tape-record various sounds and snippets from shortwave and incorporate them into his compositions. In addition to critical raves, "Movies" won considerable interest throughout the musical community, and Czukay subsequently began work on a number of outside projects, he teamed with Jaki Liebezeit and bassist Jah Wobble for the LP Full Circle and the club hit "How Much Are They." Through Wobble, Czukay also met the Japanese singer Phew, and along with Liebezeit and producer Conny Plank they recorded the 1982 album Phew.

Czukay's next official solo release was 1982's On the Way to the Peak of Normal, another collaboration with Wobble assembled from sessions with the Dusseldorf-based band SYPH. 1984's Der Osten Ist Rot and 1987's Rome Remains Rome (featuring the controversial "Blessed Easter," which contained a sample of Pope John Paul II) followed, although Czukay spent the majority of the mid-decade involved in a variety of production work. In 1988 he teamed with David Sylvian for the lovely Plight and Premonition; which the duo followed up the next year with Flux + Mutability, Czukay re-formed Can to record a new studio LP, Rite Time. Czukay used shortwave as a live, interactive musical instrument on 1991's Radio Wave Surfer, a method of composition he termed radio painting.  Apart from that and 1993's Moving Pictures, Czukay spent much of the 1990s removed from performing, nevertheless in 97 he released a live album, "Clash" . He mainly focused instead on production work before releasing Good Morning Story (his first studio album in six years) in 1999. This was followed by La Luna (2000) Linear City 2001 , an internet project working on a a recording of Sudanese Zar ceremonies.  The rest of the decade saw 3 albums released with his wife Ursula (U-She/Ursa Major) Time And Tide (01), The New Millennium (03), 21st Century in 2007.

In 2009, after a problematic time with the record company that had been gradually re-releasing his albums on CD, Czukay began a new collaboration with the Claremont 56 record label, releasing vinyl only remixes of tracks from earlier albums, as well as some new recordings. This approach has caused changes to Czukay's plans for his back catalogue, so that the original albums The East Is Red,  Rome Remains Rome  and Moving Pictures will not be reissued (master tapes degraded beyond repair). Instead, most of the tracks are being remade and newly organized as limited edition vinyl releases. Update Holger Czukay was found dead, his body was discovered inside his apartment on 5 September 2017.

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Holger Czukay's first post-Can solo album finds the bass player exploring prog rock jams with varied instrumentation, song-oriented lyrics, and media samples from film, television, and short-wave. It was the samples that put Czukay in the same category as David Byrne and Brian Eno: an art rocker exploring the early days concurrently with early hip-hop pioneers (or alternately, a white man exploiting the culture of the third world, depending on who you read). On "Persian Love," Czukay backs up clips of an Iranian singer recorded off the short-wave with lilting guitar and keyboard riffs that sparkle like light. The album is all pleasant, playful textures, with little of the darkness that Can dallied with.



Holger Czukay - Movies (flac  240mb)

01 Cool In The Pool 5:03
02 Oh Lord Give Us More Money 13:26
03 Persian Love 6:26
04 Hollywood Symphony 15:02

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Rome Remains Rome' is ex-Can bassist's 5th solo recording, and features very quirky compositions, not as eccentric as his previous releases, but his trademark editing, sudden interjections of sounds and various instruments are still distinct features of this album, albeit well and truly in 80's fashion. Starring some of his Can colleagues - Jaki Liebezeit on drums/perc, piano and trumpet, and Michael Karoli on guitar (though I can only discern his playing style on 'Perfect World'), along with Jah Wobble on Bass and vocals, Sheldon Ancel - vocals and Ollie Marland on guitar and piano. Holger himself handles vox, guitar, organ, ABS-Bass (?), French Horn, synths and radio. The LP has 3 tracks per side, and I find each side is arranged in similar style, i.e. - first song on both sides are short 'pop' songs done Czukay style (Hey Baba Reebop, Hit Hit Flop Flop) and contain odd samples and childish singing - both are amusing and entertaining, though not what you'd expect from a renowned Krautrocker. The second tracks on each side (Blessed Easter, Perfect World) are lengthy groove-based pieces, Blessed Easter has a laid-back bluesy feel with some lovely organ touches, and Perfect World has a real swing to it. All the while, a lot of peculiar edits abound, with many 'foreign' recordings and 'radio' receptions strategically incorporated into the mix. The last songs on each side are what I like best ; 'Sudetenland' is the most Can-like, with Jaki's superb drumming, and great bass riffs throughout (most likely Wobble's playing) - excellent track, and 'Music in the Air' is a dark and brooding ambient piece, and quite a surprise.



Holger Czukay - Rome Remains Rome And Excerpts From Der Osten Ist Rot (flac 384mb)

Rome Remains Rome
01 Hey Baba Rebop 3:49
02 Blessed Easter 8:52
03 Sudetenland 7:21
04 Hit Hit Flop Flop 3:34
05 Perfect World 11:29
06 Music In The Air 5:14
Der Osten Ist Rot
07 Der Osten Ist Rot (The East Is Red) 5:55
08 Das Massenmedium 3:52
09 The Photo Song 3:40
10 Rhonrad 1:36
11 Michy 3:41
12 Esperanto Socialiste 1:38
13 Traum Mal Wieder 7:26

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It seems to me that certain types of albums almost create themselves. In such cases the composer is merely the conduit for a pre-existing energy waiting to be transformed into sound. My experience with La Luna was very much like that. The album (a single 45 minute track) is in many ways a product of something similar to the automatic writing techniques of the Surrealists. I had purchased a new sampler and began experimenting with the machine without reference to the instruction manual and filled the brain of the machine to its full capacity with 'sonic memories'. In the late hours of the evening the machine came to life and spoke! The recording you hear is the transcript of this transcendental conversation between man and machine.

Slow burning is the operative phrase here. Starting from a low, mechanical din, Czukay slowly shifts the direction through undercurrents of estranged voices, string drones, glockenspiel chatter, slippery electro beats, and detached rhythmic patterns that seep into the sound field. All the while, the ominous tone of some ambient factory speaks of an eventual, chilling payoff. Halfway in, you are still heading for some uncertain conclusion, drifting about the music's dark fog. As you search your memory for a turnoff you may have missed, a soft, female voice whispers "La Luna...goddess of the moon," entering into an ode to the power of the song's subject. The music never recovers, becoming fragmented and tripping up before receding into the mist once again. The text, while significant to the concept, seems out of character in this setting, distracting from the music Czukay has so carefully crafted. Thankfully, the spoken word only takes up a small portion, allowing the listener to focus on a musical construction worth revisiting.



Holger Czukay - La Luna (flac 265mb)

01 La Luna 46:12
Bonus Track
02 La Lu Na 7:46

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re-rip

Holger Czukay - On The Way To The Peak Of Normal (flac 189mb)

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Jan 26, 2013

RhoDeo 1303 Beats


Hello, the beats go on....and today we look back almost 20 years, jeez how time flies, good thing todays artists split and found new ground since, specially The Black Dog have seen a real revival these past years, some of that is for next week, in the meantime it's back to the beginning when this world we live in today was still in it's digital infancy. . .. .... NJoy

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Taking their name from a British euphemism for imminent doom, the Black Dog Productions was founded by Ken Downie along with Ed Handley and Andy Turner. In 1989, they were unable to find a label to back their releases and had to start their own, Black Dog Productions. Their first full-length album, Bytes, was released on 15 March 1993. Their music was often produced under a number of different names, such as Close Up Over, Xeper, Atypic, I.A.O., Balil and the Discordian Popes.
Forging a challenging, relentless combination of early techno, electro, and hip-hop with a penchant for odd time signatures, high-tech atmospherics, and Egyptian iconography, the group immediately distinguished itself from the scores of disposable techno musicians covering familiar ground. They were immediately placed in the emerging "intelligent techno" category upon the release of their full-length debut..

As Plaid, Ed Handley and Andy Turner had already released a handful of material (including an album) prior to meeting Downie, but their time spent in BDP was their most productive up to that point. In addition to the Dog's inclusion on the perhaps more high-profile Artificial Intelligence compilations on Warp and remixes for the likes of Björk, Blondie, and UNKLE, they also released several full-length works as a group before Handley and Turner defected in 1995 to refocus on Plaid full-time. Downie continued on with the Black Dog name, releasing the full-length Music for Adverts (and short films) in 1996. In 2002 Downie collaborated with Parisian spoken word artist Black Sifichi on the William S. Burroughs tribute Unsavoury Products, and the Downie/Sifichi pairing was given the remix treatment on the following year's Genetically Modified. In 2001, Downie teamed up with Richard and Martin Dust, owners of the label Dust Science Recordings.[8] Since then, they have started to play live again and have released eight EPs and four full-length albums on Dust Science. Their first album, Silenced, was released in 2005.

Silenced, although only his second proper album since 1997, is another excellent album of listening techno; it bears all the hallmarks of his Black Dog classics without overly relying on them, and it has to force a readjustment in how critics view him in the history of electronica. Most closely resembling Black Dog's 1995 record Parallel (right down to the "Bolt" interludes), the record is driven more by mood than technology; the drum programs aren't complex, but Downie has a way of bewitchingly conjuring the past with his productions that not even Boards of Canada can touch.

The second, Radio Scarecrow, was released in 2008 and was very well received[10] and nominated for DJ Mag’s Best of British 2008.
The follow-up, Further Vexations, was released in 2009. It was described as having a dark cynicism of Orwellian practices of government and the passivity of the general public. "We’ve helplessly watched with mounting horror, while the government trashed the country, signed away its sovereignty to Brussels (with a flourish of a specially minted silver pen), sold off precious national industries and assets at next to bargain basement prices, and indulged itself with two utterly pointless wars which it couldn’t afford," the group stated on their home page. It was followed by Final Collected Vexations a year later

In May 2010, the Black Dog teamed with creative agency "Human" to create Music For Real Airports, described by them as "a contemporary reply to Brian Eno's work from the 70s". While Eno's album is well known for being peaceful and sedate, The Black Dog intend theirs to be tense and bittersweet, saying "This record is not necessarily a comfortable listen. But it captures the spectrum of emotions stirred by airports.

2011 saw a flurry of activity under a Liber 'umbrella' Chaos, Dogma, Nox, temple, Kult.


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Black Dog Productions' full-length debut is a sprawling deviation from techno-as-throwaway-dancefloor-fare, weaving surprisingly engaging melodic and harmonic passages around complex rhythmic patterns and diverse, somewhat ambient atmospherics. Although all of the material was previously released in 12" or EP form, it holds up surprisingly well as a unified, coherent whole. With B12's Electro-Soma and Autechre's Incunabula, one of the first and finest blasts in the European "intelligent techno" movement.



Black Dog Productions - Bytes ( flac 422mb)

01 Plaid - Object Orient 5:44
02 Close Up Over - Caz 6:15
03 Xeper - Carceres Ex Novum 6:42
04 Atypic - Focus Mel 7:12
05 Close Up Over - Olivine 4:45
06 I.A.O. - Clan (Mongol Hordes) 6:24
07 Plaid - Yamemm 6:14
08 Discordian Popes - Fight The Hits 6:20
09 Balil - Merck 4:33
10 Close Up Over - Jauqq 5:46
11 Balil - 3/4 Heart 7:34

Black Dog Productions - Bytes (ogg 165mb)

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Black Dog's proper debut, this time for the GPR label. Includes probably the group's most well-known single track, "Cost II," released on 12-inch simultaneously with the album.



The Black Dog - Temple of Transparent Balls (flac  383mb)

01 Cost I 5:05
02 Cost II 6:30
03 4, 7, 8, 6:11
04 The Actor And Audience 5:17
05 Jupiler 4:42
06 Kings Of Sparta 4:11
07 Sharp Shooting On Saturn 6:39
08 Mango 5:36
09 Cycle 7:09
10 In The Light Of Grey 5:22
11 The Crete That Crete Made 5:10
 
The Black Dog - Temple of Transparent Balls (ogg  140mb )

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The last release under the group name before the trio splintered, Spanners is a great full-packed CD of modern electronic music, the band drawing on everything from dub to avant-garde experimentalism to create a varied, intoxicating collection. Funk samples are twisted and played with rather than lovingly reused, lyrics eschewed for obscure or unintelligible samples at most, generally straightforward dancefloor tracks still sound slightly hesitant or off. Even from the first song, "Raxmus," it's not too surprising that this appeared on Warp Records; the blend of shuffling yet crisp beat, ambient tones, and other sonic touches and tweaks practically could have been tailormade as a calling card for the label. Certainly, there's a healthy sense of playfulness and obscurity that won't surprise fans of labelmate Aphex Twin, neither will song titles like "Psil-Coysin" and "Nommo." The highlights are many, most often achieving a solid combination of dancefloor friendliness and unexpected sonic trickery. "Chase the Manhattan" may have a cringeworthy pun of a title, but the brisk funk/world percussion beat, soothing synth washes, and distorted electronic bass stabs all come together wonderfully. "Further Harm" shifts a number of times during its length, sometimes playing around with rough beats low in the mix and at other points serving up a variety of keyboard melodies interspersed with brief vocal bits. Other numbers of note include "Pot Noodle," with what sounds like a soft acoustic guitar or a keyboard programmed to sound like one playing a lazy, relaxed melody under the main loop, and the echoing, minimal percussion breaks and squelchy electro-inspired tones of "Frisbee Skip." A series of brief bridge tracks entitled "Bolt" (i.e., "Bolt1," "Bolt2," etc.) crop up throughout Spanners, mostly following their own curious logic as they slide from one track to the next.



The Black Dog - Spanners (flac 449mb)

01 Raxmus 3:03
02 Bolt1 0:27
03 Barbola Work 6:42
04 Bolt2 0:27
05 Psil-Cosyin 10:32
06 Chase The Manhattan 5:42
07 Bolt3 1:36
08 Tahr 3:08
09 Bolt4 1:06
10 Further Harm 6:18
11 Nommo 6:53
12 Bolt5 0:22
13 Pot Noddle 7:13
14 Bolt6 0:42
15 End Of Time 3:44
16 Utopian Dream 6:00
17 Bolt7 0:17
18 Frisbee Skip 5:25
19 Chesh 6:03

The Black Dog - Spanners (ogg 172mb)

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With a cover thumbing its nose at Brian Eno's similarly titled series of albums from the 1970s and song titles ranging in reference from bad Hollywood films to washing powders, it would seem the Black Dog is engaged in a bit of a musical piss-take. Nothing of the sort, actually, as lone Dog Ken Downie's first solo work since the departure of partners Ed Handley and Andy Turner is a serious, often wistful collection of post-rave electronica, incorporating elements of techno, ambient, hip-hop, jungle, and jazz. Although lacking somewhat in complexity, Downie more than makes up for it in focus and emotional content.



The Black Dog - Music For Adverts (And Short Films) ( flac 347mb)

01 Dumb & Dumber 1:37
02 The Wind Spirit 2:10
03 Jordan 1:47
04 Tzaddi 4:18
05 Pod #1 1:35
06 No Lamers 4:29
07 Edgar Allan 3:49
08 Harpo 0:39
09 Strange Hill 3:06
10 The Big Issue 3:03
11 Crayola 2:06
12 Horny 1:09
13 AGW 1:22
14 Seti 1:03
15 Darkness 2:58
16 Euthanasia 5:22
17 Gerry Noman 0:57
18 Meditation No #4 3:41
19 Stratus 1:04
20 Dissidence 1:02
21 As Clouds Go By 1:02
22 Disench 1:29
23 Minour 4:37
24 Mo 3:07
25 Wot 0:33
26 Kheprit 6:52

The Black Dog - Music For Adverts (And Short Films) (ogg 126mb)

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 re-rip and now in Flac

The Black Dog - Silenced 05 now in Flac 303mb)

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Jan 24, 2013

RhoDeo 1303 Goldy Rhox 92


Hello, today the 92nd post of GoldyRhox, classic pop rock. Today in the blacklight an English artist in the 1960s as a key member of The Spencer Davis Group, Traffic, Blind Faith and Go. He's a songwriter and musician whose genres include blue-eyed soul, R&B, rock, blues-rock, pop-rock, and jazz. As a multi-instrumentalist, he plays the electric organ, synthesizers, bass, drums, guitar, mandolin, violin and other strings. A star performer for nearly fifty years, he has also done notable work as a producer. In 2008, Rolling Stone magazine ranked him #33 in its 100 Greatest Singers of All Time. He has won numerous Grammy Awards in the United States.

At the age of 14 he joined the Spencer Davis Group, along with his older brother Muff, who later had success as a record producer. At the end of 1965 the group had their first number one single with "Keep On Running" and the money from this success allowed Winwood to buy his own Hammond B-3 organ. He co-wrote and recorded the hits "Gimme Some Loving" and "I'm a Man" before leaving the Spencer Davis Group. He met drummer Jim Capaldi, guitarist Dave Mason, and multi-instrumentalist Chris Wood, when they jammed together at The Elbow Room, in April 1967, the quartet formed Traffic.

Weariness with the grind of touring and recording prompted him to leave Traffic and retire to sessioning for some years. Under pressure from Island Records, he resurfaced with his self-titled first solo album in 1977. This was followed by his 1980 hit mystery album (which included his first solo hit, "While You See A Chance" and Talking Back to the Night in 1982. Both albums were recorded at his home in Gloucestershire with Winwood playing all instruments.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Todays mystery album was released on the June of 1986, is the fourth solo album of our 'darklight'. It was a top ten hit on the album charts in the United States, hitting #3, and has sold over five million copies. The single "Higher Love" topped the singles chart and won the Grammy Award for "Record of the Year";  This was his last studio album with Island Records after 20 years with the label.


Goldy Rhox 92   (flac 290mb)

Goldy Rhox 92  ( ogg 127mb)


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Jan 23, 2013

RhoDeo1303 Aetix


Hello,  snow is a rarety around here, that's what i said last week, meanwhile it's still here after a whole week and it looks it will last even longer, considering it never lasts long in the city, truly remarkble.

Meanwhile, it's Aetix time for a frontrunner. Stereotyped early in his career as the quintessential angry young man, Graham Parker was one of the most successful singer/songwriters to emerge from England's pub rock scene of the early '70s. Parker developed a sinewy fusion of driving rock & roll and confessional folk-rock, highlighted by his indignant passion, biting sarcasm, and bristling anger. In terms of establishing a recording career in early 1976, Parker preceded two other new wave English singer-songwriters to whom he is often compared: Elvis Costello and Joe Jackson  .....  N'Joy

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After spending much of his early adulthood working odd jobs, ranging from breeding mice and guinea pigs to working at a gas station, Parker began seriously pursuing a musical career in 1975. Until that time, he had played in a number of obscure pub rock groups, including a cover band that had spent time playing in Morocco and Gibraltar. But it wasn't until 1975 that he began shopping his demos. That year, Dave Robinson, one of the co-founders of the new independent label Stiff, heard one of Parker's demo tapes and encouraged the songwriter, helping him assemble a backing band called the Rumour. Robinson rounded up several stars of the pub rock scene -- guitarist Brinsley Schwarz and keyboardist Bob Andrews, both formerly of the leading pub rockers Brinsley Schwarz, former Ducks Deluxe guitarist Martin Belmont, former Bontemps Roulez drummer Steve Goulding, and bassist Andrew Bodnar -- to form the Rumour, and the band was soon supporting Parker on the dying pub rock scene. The group landed a record contract with Mercury by the end of 1975.

Graham Parker & the Rumour headed into the studio to cut their debut album with producer Nick Lowe, who gave the resulting record, Howlin' Wind, an appealingly ragged edge. Howlin' Wind was greeted with enthusiastic reviews upon its summer release, as was the similar Heat Treatment, which followed in the fall. Despite the positive press, Parker was growing frustrated with Mercury, believing that the company was not properly promoting and distributing his records. His third album, Stick to Me, had to be re-recorded quickly after the original tapes were discovered to be defective prior to its scheduled release. As a result, Stick to Me received mixed reviews upon its fall 1977 release, which derailed Parker's momentum slightly. Furthermore, Elvis Costello, a fellow pub rock survivor who possessed not only a more pop-oriented style of songwriting, but also a more dangerous persona, soon eclipsed Parker in popularity.

Frustrated by his career hitting a standstill, Parker released the live-double album The Parkerilla in the summer of 1978 in order to get out of his contract. Following a short but intense bidding war, he quickly signed to Arista Records, where he released "Mercury Poisoning" -- a blistering attack on his former record label -- as the B-side of a promotional single as his first record for the label.
Squeezing Out Sparks, Parker's first album for Arista, put a halt to that decline. Sporting a slicker, new wave-oriented production -- it was the first of his records not to have any involvement from Nick Lowe -- the album was greeted with terrific reviews and, on the strengths of radio hits like "Local Girls," it became his most successful album, reaching number 40 on the American charts and selling over 200,000 copies.

Parker was poised for a major breakthrough, but that didn't happen. He followed Squeezing Out Sparks in 1980 with the Jimmy Iovine-produced The Up Escalator, which was considerably slicker than its predecessor. The Up Escalator didn't sell, and Parker decided to ditch the Rumour, who had already begun a solo career. For 1982's Another Grey Area, he hired producer Jack Douglas and a team of session musicians, resulting in a radio-ready production that received mixed reviews, yet managed to peak at number 51. The Real Macaw, which followed in 1983, suffered a similar fate. For 1985's Steady Nerves, Parker moved to Elektra Records and formed a backing band called the Shot with guitarist Brinsley Schwarz, who helped him deliver his most radio-ready collection. This time, the pop move paid off. "Wake Up (Next to You)" became his only Top 40 hit, and the album stayed on the charts for nearly as long as Squeezing Out Sparks.

Despite his moderate commercial success with Steady Nerves, the album wasn't widely praised, and he also ran into trouble with Elektra, leaving the label after just one record. He briefly moved to Atlantic, which dropped him without releasing a single record. Consequently, Parker wasn't able to deliver another album until 1988, when he signed with RCA and released The Mona Lisa's Sister in the spring. Hailed as a comeback by several critics upon its release, the album generated a college radio hit with "Get Started (Start a Fire)" and spent 19 weeks on the charts. Instead of being the beginning of a comeback, the album turned out to be a last gasp: it was the last time Parker was able to crack the Top 100. Live! Alone in America (1989) received positive reviews but was ignored, and 1990's mild worldbeat experiment Human Soul received mixed reviews and peaked at number 165 on the charts. Parker's final album for RCA -- and his last album to chart -- was the stripped-down Struck By Lightning (1991), and while it was critically praised, it didn't find an audience outside of his cult. The following year, he switched to Capitol and released Burning Questions, which was ignored.

Following the release of 1993's double-disc anthology Passion Is No Ordinary Word, Parker made the leap to independent labels -- he had spent time at all but one of the major labels (Columbia/Sony) with little success. In 1994, he released the Christmas Cracker EP on Dakota Arts, and then he signed with Razor & Tie, where he released 12 Haunted Episodes in the spring. Like The Mona Lisa's Sister and Struck By Lightning before it, 12 Haunted Episodes was hailed as a comeback, and it sold in respectable numbers for an indie release. Parker followed it with two albums in 1996, Live from New York, NY and Acid Bubblegum, which appeared within two months of each other late in the summer. Early in 1997, he released yet another live album, the double-disc The Last Rock N Roll Tour, which was recorded with the power pop quartet the Figgs. Parker continued to issue a steady stream of archive and live releases into the mid-2000s, and moved into singer/songwriter mode for the albums Deepcut to Nowhere and Your Country, the latter a roots rock-influenced affair released by the Chicago-based Bloodshot Records.

The Figgs were back for 2005's Songs of No Consequence, an album that Parker declared "rocks like safari park chimp" in pre-release publicity. Unreleased material, rare edits, and remixes were featured on Official Art Vandelay Tapes, Vol. 2, which appeared two weeks after Songs of No Consequence. Don't Tell Columbus arrived in March 2007. The clever Imaginary Television appeared in 2010, along with the DVD Live at the FTC. Parker unexpectedly reunited his original backing band the Rumour in 2011, recording a new album that became 2012's Three Chords Good. The reunion album appeared in November 2012, around the same time Judd Apatow's This Is Forty -- a movie where Graham Parker & the Rumour provide a plot point -- hit the theaters, thereby pushing the singer/songwriter into the mainstream spotlight for the first time in years.

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The music is blend of rock and roll, R&B, reggae, and folk music, behind Parker's searingly intelligent lyrics and passionate vocals. Critics likened Parker's spirit to British punk rock, then in its early stage, and retrospectively to that of singer-songwriters Elvis Costello and Joe Jackson, who would release their debut records within a few years of Howlin' Wind. Instead of blindly sticking to the traditions of rock & roll, Parker invigorates them with cynicism and anger, turning his songs into distinctively original works. "Back to Schooldays" may be reconstituted rockabilly, "White Honey"'s white R&B bounce, and "Howlin' Wind" is a cross of Van's more mystical moments and the Band, but the songs themselves are original and terrific. Similarly, producer Nick Lowe gives the album a tough, spare feeling, which makes Parker and the Rumour sound like one of the best bar bands you've ever heard. Howlin' Wind remains a thoroughly invigorating fusion of rock tradition, singer/songwriter skill, and punk spirit, making it one of the classic debuts of all time.



Graham Parker and The Rumour - Howlin Wind (flac 276mb)

01 White Honey 3:36
02 Nothin's Gonna Pull Us Apart 3:21
03 Silly Thing 2:56
04 Gypsy Blood 4:36
05 Between You And Me 2:26
06 Back To Schooldays 2:56
07 Soul Shoes 3:16
08 Lady Doctor 2:51
09 You've Got To Be Kidding 3:25
10 Howlin' Wind 3:59
11 Not If It Pleases Me 3:12
12 Don't Ask Me Questions 5:39
13 I'm Gonna Use It Now 3:11

Graham Parker and The Rumour - Howlin Wind  ( ogg 100mb)

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The original recording was ruined, and all the songs needed to be rerecorded hastily."...for "Stick to Me," we had an 80-piece string section playing. But the whole album had to be scrapped because the master tape was leaking oxide or something. The producer, again, didn't seem to spot it. We saw this black stuff coming off the tapes but he didn't notice it. When we came to mix it, it was un-mixable." There are gems among the songs, and the album's atmosphere is intense, suiting the year of punk rock. The dramatic title track became a live staple. The stark ballad "Watch the Moon Come Down" is his most serious song yet and perhaps the closest a Parker song would come to expressing despair; it would be featured on solo Graham Parker tours over a decade later. Other tracks like "The New York Shuffle" and "The Raid" are humorous and fast-paced. On "The Heat in Harlem", Parker and the Rumour push the limits of their form, creating a sort of psychedelic R&B.



Graham Parker and The Rumour - Stick To Me   ( flac 224mb)

01 Stick To Me 3:27
02 I'm Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down 3:26
03 Problem Child 3:26
04 Soul On Ice 3:00
05 Clear Head 2:56
06 The New York Shuffle 2:57
07 Watch The Moon Come Down 4:52
08 Thunder And Rain 3:14
09 The Heat In Harlem 6:57
10 The Raid 2:29

Graham Parker and The Rumour - Stick To Me  (ogg 83mb)

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Generally regarded as Graham Parker's finest album, Squeezing Out Sparks is a masterful fusion of pub rock classicism, new wave pop, and pure vitriol that makes even his most conventional singer/songwriter numbers bristle with energy. Not only does Parker deliver his best, most consistent set of songs, but he offers more succinct hooks than before -- "Local Girls" and "Discovering Japan" are powered by quirky hooks that make them new wave classics. But Parker's new pop inclinations are tempered by his anger, which seethes throughout the hard rockers and even his quieter numbers. Throughout Squeezing Out Sparks, Graham spits out a litany of offenses that make him feel like an outsider, but he's not a liberal, he's a conservative. The record's two centerpieces -- "Passion Is No Ordinary Word" and the anti-abortion "You Can't Be Too Strong" -- indicate that his traditionalist musical tendencies are symptomatic of a larger conservative trend. But no one ever said conservatives made poor rock & rollers, and Parker's ruminations over a lost past give him the anger that fuels Squeezing Out Sparks, one of the great rock records of the post-punk era. In 2003 Rolling Stone placed it at number 335 on its list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.



Graham Parker and The Rumour - Squeezing Out Sparks  (flac 266mb)

01 Discovering Japan 3:26
02 Local Girls 3:34
03 Nobody Hurts You 3:39
04 You Can't Be Too Strong 3:40
05 Passion Is No Ordinary Word 3:15
06 Saturday Night Is Dead 4:26
07 Love Gets You Twisted 3:17
08 Protection 2:59
09 Waiting For The UFOs 3:51
10 Don't Get Too Excited 3:07
11 Mercury Poisoning 3:10
12 I Want You Back 3:27

Graham Parker and The Rumour - Squeezing Out Sparks    (ogg 96mb)

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Jan 22, 2013

RhoDeo 1303 Roots


Hello, since the mid eighties, UK was established as the new center of dub production, with originators Mad Professor and Jah Shaka, paving the way for a all new open minded generation of producers, DJs, soundsystems and studios, followers of steppers approach, and willing to preserve and pass on dis tradition. Embodying in the sound a whole new kind of digital and electronic musical variations, like drum n bass, jungle, techno, dubstep…they keep on to perpetuate and recreate the diversity and originality within the style till present days.

A disciple of Lee "Scratch" Perry, Mad Professor was one of the leading producers in dub reggae's second generation. His Dub Me Crazy albums helped dub make the transition into the digital age, when electronic productions started to take over mainstream reggae in the '80s. His space-age tracks not only made use of new digital technology, but often expanded dub's sonic blueprint, adding more elements and layers of sound than his forebears typically did.  .... N'joy

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Mad Professor was born Neal Fraser (or Neil Fraser) circa 1955 in Guyana, a small country in the northern part of South America. He earned his nickname as a preteen, thanks to his intense interest in electronics; he even built his own radio. At age 13, his family moved to London, and around age 20, he started collecting recording equipment: reel-to-reel tape decks, echo and reverb effects, and the like. In 1979, he built his own mixing board and opened a four-track studio in his living room in the south London area of Thornton Heath. Calling it Ariwa, after a Nigerian word for sound or communication, he began recording bands and vocalists for his own label of the same name, mostly in the lovers rock vein: Deborahe Glasgow, Aquizim, Sergeant Pepper, Tony Benjamin, Davina Stone, and Ranking Ann, among others. Amid complaints from his neighbors, he moved the studio to a proper facility in Peckham, South London. In 1982 he recorded his first album, Dub Me Crazy, Pt. 1, and quickly followed it with a second volume, the successful Beyond the Realms of Dub. 1983 brought two more volumes, The African Connection (acclaimed) and the fairly popular Escape to the Asylum of Dub.
The Ariwa studio was moved to a better neighborhood in West Norwood during the mid-'80s, and upgraded for 24-track capability, making it the largest black-owned studio in the U.K. From there, Mad Professor really started to make an impact on the British reggae scene. He produced major hit singles for Ariwa mainstay Pato Banton and Sandra Cross, and also helmed the breakthrough album for conscious reggae toaster Macka B, 1986's Sign of the Times. At the same time, the ragga era was dawning, and all-digital productions began to take over reggae. As the ragga sound grew more and more dominant, Mad Professor's brand of dub got spacier and weirder; while ragga detractors complained that Mad Professor's work sounded sterile compared to the dub of old, many praised his otherworldly effects and inventive arrangements. The Dub Me Crazy albums reached the height of their experimentalism during the latter part of the '80s, although by the early '90s they were showing signs of creative burnout. The 12th and final volume in the series, Dub Maniacs on the Rampage, was released in 1993.

Meanwhile, Ariwa continued to prosper as a label, with further hits by the likes of Macka B, Pato Banton, Sandra Cross, female singer Kofi, Intense, Jah Shaka, John McLean, the Robotics, Sister Audrey, Peter Culture, Johnny Clark, and others. Additionally, he began to collaborate with some of reggae's better-known figures; most crucially, he teamed up with main influence Lee "Scratch" Perry for the first time on the 1989 set Mystic Warrior. In 1991, he produced the first of several albums for the groundbreaking veteran DJ U-Roy, the acclaimed True Born African; he also went on to work with the likes of Yabby You and Bob Andy. He switched his focus to touring in 1992 and released the 100th album on Ariwa not long after.

With his high-profile collaborators, Mad Professor started to make a name for himself outside of the reggae community, and soon found himself in demand as a remixer for rock, R&B, and electronica acts. Over the course of the '90s and into the new millennium, he would remix tracks by Sade, the Orb, the KLF, the Beastie Boys, Jamiroquai, Rancid, Depeche Mode, and Perry Farrell, among others. His best-known project, however -- and the one that truly established his credentials -- was 1995's No Protection, a completely reimagined version of trip-hop collective Massive Attack's second album, Protection. Perhaps creatively refreshed, Mad Professor's own albums started to regain their consistency in the mid-'90s.

Mixing electronics with rootsier, more organic sounds indebted to the earliest days of dub, he left behind the Dub Me Crazy moniker to launch a new series, the subtly Afrocentric Black Liberation Dub. The first volume was released in 1994, and others followed steadily into the new millennium, albeit at a less prolific pace than the Dub Me Crazy installments. More collaborations with Perry and U-Roy followed as well. In 2005, Mad Professor celebrated Ariwa's 25th anniversary with a tour of the U.K. alongside Perry and the double-CD retrospective Method to the Madness. In 2009 he released several albums, Times Hard under the moniker Mad Professor vs. Joint Chiefs and the back to basics Audio Illusion of Dub as well as Revolution Feat. Pato Banton And Mr. Professor, Nairobi Meets Mad Professor – Wu Wei, and in 2010 Izrael Meets Mad Professor and Joe Ariwa and in 2012 The Roots of Dubstep. Neal "Mad Professor" Fraser has been a prolific producer, contributing to or producing nearly 200 albums.

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Digital dub straight out of the Ariwa studios in Peckham. Pato Banton works some lyrical magic over the Professor's super tight digital dub workouts. This collaboration with Jamaican singer Pato Banton is typically mind-expanding, with more pop intent and extending vocal tracks.



Mad Professor Captures Pato Banton (flac  234mb)

01 Mad Professor Captures Pato Banton 6:00
02 Gwarn! (Go On) 7:42
03 Nuff Kind Of Dread 7:13
04 King Step 7:24
05 Give Me Oil 4:17
06 My Opinion 5:41

Mad Professor Captures Pato Banton (ogg 99mb)

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Mad Professor was contacted by Massive Attack after "Protection" was released to remix a song for a single. After the single was remixed, the band asked Mad Professor to listen to more of the album to explore the possibility of further remixes. The project then became a track by track remix of almost the entire album. Mad Professor heavily edited the original material to form a slow, pulsating mix in which the beat is emphasized, reverb is extensively used and the occasional vocals (many of the tracks are almost entirely instrumental) fade in-and-out in typical dub fashion, making a hypnotic, if slightly repetitive, mix. The result is arguably more textured than the original as Mad Professor returned the group to their experimental, cut-and-paste dub reggae and hip-hop roots. He has made Protection into a more daring and fulfilling album with his remixes.



Mad Professor vs Massive Attack - No Protection (flac  319mb)

01 Radiation Ruling The Nation (Protection) 8:35
02 Bumper Ball Dub (Karmacoma) 5:59
03 Trinity Dub (Three) 4:22
04 Cool Monsoon (Weather Storm) 7:10
05 Eternal Feedback (Sly) 6:26
06 Moving Dub (Better Things) 5:57
07 I Spy (Spying Glass) 5:07
08 Backward Sucking (Heat Miser) 6:16

Mad Professor vs Massive Attack - No Protection (ogg 119mb)

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Legendary dub producer Mad Professor has made consistency his calling card, and in a year in which he released a half-dozen albums, New Decade of Dub stand out from the competition. On his second collaboration with fellow British dub master Jah Shaka, the tripped-out psychedelic sounds are a bit more stripped-down than usual, with the spotlight primarily resting on the percussion talents of Drumtan Ward. Frequent sideman Black Steel contributes his typically tasteful guitar work to the proceedings, and Louis Farrakhan is even sampled to great effect. It's a bit more restrained than most of Mad Professor's more experimental work with the inimitable Lee "Scratch" Perry, but a fine excursion into dub's deep roots nonetheless.



Mad Professor & Jah Shaka - New Decade Of Dub (flac 276mb)

01 Ecological Dub 4:16
02 Natural Roots 3:23
03 One Million Man Dub 3:51
04 Wig Wam 4:21
05 Chanting Down The Wicked 4:17
06 New Decade Dub 4:01
07 Gautrey Road Style 4:23
08 Roots Jamboree 3:33
09 Zulu Hut 3:51
10 Morphing Dub 4:23
11 Only One God 4:01

Mad Professor & Jah Shaka - New Decade Of Dub (ogg 109mb)

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